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Posts Tagged ‘Preston’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 7, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

Of all the “lost” towns of King County the mostly thoroughly obliterated probably is Taylor, seven miles east of Maple Valley.

Taylor, once with a population close to 700 persons, was swallowed by the Cedar River watershed. Today a young forest is springing from its streets and gardens, and the sites of the coal bunkers and kilns of its once-prosperous clay industry.

Taylor ceased to exist in 1947. Two years earlier, the Seattle Water Department had obtained a condemnation judgment permitting it to include the town in the watershed. (more…)

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Originally published in The Issaquah Press, October 24, 1990

Victor and Gustava Sandell, at left, brought their young family to Issaquah in 1888, and built one of the first large family homes in the city in 1889. Their daughter Alma and her husband Evan Watkins, right, lived in the house for many years. That home at the corner of Alder and First Avenue NW was a city landmark for a century. It was torn down last year to make way for a new apartment building. Photos courtesy of Walt Watkins.

Victor and Gustava Sandell, at left, brought their young family to Issaquah in 1888, and built one of the first large family homes in the city in 1889. Their daughter Alma and her husband Evan Watkins, right, lived in the house for many years. That home at the corner of Alder and First Avenue NW was a city landmark for a century. It was torn down last year to make way for a new apartment building. Photos courtesy of Walt Watkins.

Victor and Gustava Sandell were both born in Finland. They arrived in Issaquah in 1888 from Michigan with daughter Ethel and son Frank. Another son and daughter, Samuel and Alma, were born within a few years of their arrival here. (more…)

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Originally published in the Issaquah Press, April 29, 1970

By Gene Woodwick

Seattle, Lake Shore and Eastern Railway’s Engine No. 2, the D.H. Gilman, photographed on Independence Day, 1895.

Seattle, Lake Shore and Eastern Railway’s Engine No. 2, the D.H. Gilman, photographed on Independence Day, 1895.

The recent merger of the railroads will soon affect the rail system through the Issaquah and Snoqualmie Valleys.

Eighty-one years ago the big news in both valleys was that the railroads were coming through. Now there would be a way to ship the hops, dairy, and forest products to markets and the area could really be opened for settlement.

In 1885 the Seattle, Lake Shore and Eastern Railroad company was formed by some citizens in Seattle, headed by Daniel Heine Gilman. (more…)

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Originally published in the Issaquah Press, October 18, 1962

high-trestle-near-issaquahIt is often surprising to stand in a familiar spot, looking around as you have many times before, and see things you never knew were there.

This happened to me one evening recently outside the east door of the high school, a place where I’ve stood many times before. There was still some daylight, everyone else was still inside the building, and I had a good chance to observe the whole southeast part of town from the top of “school house hill.” Many interesting things appear from up there which are typically part of Issaquah, and make up its character.

There is the yellow, wooden spire of St. Joseph’s Church, for instance, just visible above the trees. It was built there in 1896 on land donated by Peter McCloskey, and has been in constant use by the town’s Catholic congregation ever since. There were no trees around it then, because all the big timber had been cut off to make room for the vigorous new town and there hadn’t been time to grow new ones.

However, the forest was still thick a few blocks to the east and around the railroad trestle on the N.P. branch line to Snoqualmie. There wasn’t even a road out there in 1900, for the route to the easterly neighbor towns of Fall City and Snoqualmie was by way of Vaughn’s Hill. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 17, 2002

By Barbara Nilson

Iver Iverson, Sr. purchased William Wood’s interest in this Red and White Market in 1940 and ran the store and post office with his son, Iver Iverson, Jr. The original Wood and Iverson company store burned in 1935 leaving the feed building pictured here that was used as the grocery store and post office, until it, too, burned in 1943. It was rebuilt in 1946 by Iverson, Jr. The history of the post office will be presented April 28. (Photo from Washington State Archives)

Iver Iverson, Sr. purchased William Wood’s interest in this Red and White Market in 1940 and ran the store and post office with his son, Iver Iverson, Jr. The original Wood and Iverson company store burned in 1935 leaving the feed building pictured here that was used as the grocery store and post office, until it, too, burned in 1943. It was rebuilt in 1946 by Iverson, Jr. The history of the post office will be presented April 28. (Photo from Washington State Archives)

Hobart residents, past and present, will meet Sunday, April 28, 1:30 p.m., at the Hobart Community Church for their annual reunion, sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society. Presenting the program on the history of the Hobart post office will be Warren Iverson and his mother, Dorothy.

The Iverson family has the longest involvement in the Hobart post office, because their husband and father, Iver Christian Iverson, Jr. accepted the position of acting postmaster in 1932. He became postmaster in 1933 and remained until he was forced to retire by mandatory age of 70 in 1972. He died in 1973. (more…)

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