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Posts Tagged ‘Primrose’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 4, 1926

Editors and publishers of approximately 100 newspapers in the State of Washington were the guests of the Pacific Coast Coal Company at Newcastle and the Briquet Plant, last Saturday. This excursion was the closing feature of the Fourteenth Annual Newspaper Institute of the Washington Press Association.

The picture shows the group ready to board the special train after having made a trip into the Primrose Seam, a mile and a quarter into the heart of the mountain, from whence comes the famous Newcastle coal. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 25, 1926

Members of the Washington State Press Association, in their fourteenth Annual Institute in Seattle, are to be the guests of the Pacific Coast Coal Company on Saturday, February 27. They will visit Newcastle, where they will make a trip into Primrose Tunnel, after which they will inspect the Briquet Plant on their return to Seattle. The Pacific Coast Coal Company welcomes this opportunity to greet the representatives of the press.

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 6, 1925

Constant practice makes perfect, and adherence to this truth makes the Black Diamond Mine Rescue Team one of the best. This picture shows the team with its apparatus in place and ready to enter the mine where their skill would enable them to be of invaluable assistance in case of need.

A.G. Wallace, captain of the team, was a member of the Washington Champions in 1923, which went from Black Diamond to Salt Lake City, winning third prize in the International contest held there. From left to right: Joe Bisch, Joe Meza, A. McDonald, A. Kirkbride, Fred Goldner, and A.G. Wallace. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 11, 1925

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. tour.

More than four hundred Seattle women, members of the Parent-Teacher Associations of the city, spent one hour and 25 minutes at the Briquet Plant of the Pacific Coast Coal Company last Monday. They were enroute to the Newcastle Mine, but the special train of six coaches stopped at the Briquet Plant long enough to enable Supt. Geo. N. Calkins and Foreman Clarence Gorst to show them the entire intricate process of manufacturing Diamond Briquets.

After following the raw Black Diamond and South Prairie coal through the plant to where it emerged a perfectly blended fuel in the form of briquets, the party paused by this storage pile of 12,000 tons to have its picture taken. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 4, 1925

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today's Gene Coulon Park.

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today’s Gene Coulon Park.

More than million briquets made daily

In 1914 the Briquet Plant was opened and has run continuously since that time. It operates two shifts of eight hours each and produces five hundred tons of briquets a day. That means that more than one and one-half million briquets are made each day.

The briquets are made from a combination of Black Diamond and South Prairie coals. The first of these give it its free burning quality and low ash and the last, a coking coal, gives it its strength and fire holding power. The binder used is a specially prepared form of asphalt from which the stickiness has been removed.

The trip through the plant will be in the direction in which the coal is run, beginning at the point where the raw coal is received and ending at the point where the finished briquet goes into the railroad cars. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 14, 1924

Deep down in the canyon of the Carbon River, and some distance down the stream from the mine tunnel entrances, is situated the bunkers and tipple of Carbonado Mine. The topography of the place fortunately permits the use of gravity to a very large extent in the handling of the coal. (more…)

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Respect for the flag is one of the first marks of patriotism. The man who can talk the loudest about the duties of citizenship often forgets to uncover when the flag goes marching by, or sits with a bored expression on his face when the national anthem is played. It is not for the flag itself, but rather for what it stands, that every true American owes due homage and respect to its starry folds.

Salute the flag! Stand at attention to the strains of The Star Spangled Banner! For thus is patriotism fostered in the youth of our land and respect for law and order maintained. (more…)

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