Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Puget Sound’

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, February 18, 1998

Pending rate increase would provide funds for much-needed improvements, say city officials

By Paul Schmidt
The Courier-Herald

Dan DalSanto scans the surrounding landscape after returning from a trip across the Green River over a suspension bridge that carries Black Diamond’s water supply. (Photo by Paul Schmidt)

For years Black Diamond officials have postponed most major improvements to the city’s water system, firm in their hope they would eventually tap into a new, high-capacity, Tacoma-owned water line.

Money spent for a larger reservoir and related components would be redundant, especially with the long-planned Pipeline 5 in the future, its route designed to cut through the middle of town.

So went the thinking, says Public Works Director Dan DalSanto.

Pipeline 5’s future is now in some doubt with the endangered species listing of Puget Sound Chinook salmon. But having waited all these years for the pipeline to arrive, Black Diamond finds itself with a water system fast needing improvements and expanded capacity. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 24, 1925

Christmas gives us another opportunity to extend a word of greeting to every member of the Pacific Coast family, and to wish the compliments of the season to all of you. Regardless of the vicissitudes of our daily lives throughout the year, when the Yuletide approaches we turn our thoughts towards the theme of “Peace on Earth, Good Will Toward Men.”

It is fitting then, that we should desire health, prosperity, and happiness for everyone. To some at the mines this will be their first Christmas with the company. Many others will count it their fifth, while there are some whose service runs back for many years. To every one we extend our cordial wishes for a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.

E.C. Ward, President (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, November 22, 1925

Prosperous town on Naches Pass Highway surrounded by rich agricultural, timber, and mineral lands, is boasting of rapid development

New mill of the White River Lumber Company on the White River, three miles from Enumclaw.

One of the earliest settlements in that part of the state and the only place of that name in the United States, Enumclaw, forty miles southeast of Seattle, is one of the biggest little towns in the West.

Early history and distinctive name, however, are not Enumclaw’s only claims for attention. Thought its early growth was slow, Enumclaw today is counted one of the most prosperous towns in the Puget Sound region. Rich agricultural land, timber, and mineral surround it. It is on the Naches Pass highway, the most direct route between Seattle and the west entrance to Mount Rainier Nation Park. It is the gateway to unlimited scenic attractions, fishing, and hunting grounds. Backup up against the Cascade foothills, Enumclaw is within two hours’ drive of perpetual snow on one side and the waters of Puget Sound on the other. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 19, 1925

Shortly before the tunnel work was completed in the New Black Diamond Mine last month, Manager of Mines D.C. Botting arranged for the mine superintendents and supervisors from each of the camps to inspect the property.

In addition to going over the New Black Diamond property the party also visited the Briquet Plant, where the process of manufacturing Diamond Briquets was witnessed first hand. The picture shows the group on the trestle leading from the mine entrance to the tipple and bunkers under construction. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Publication unknown, 1997

By Mike Schroeder, Ravensdale’s volunteer lake monitor

Mike Schroeder enjoys the Northwest’s treats—Ravensdale Lake, a good cup of coffee, or a ferry trip out of town.

Ravensdale Lake is a relatively shallow spring-fed lake of about 17 acres, located in southeastern King County. Averaging about 4 feet in depth, the lake is over 16 feet deep at its deepest part. Ravensdale Creek, Lake Sawyer, Soos Creek, and the Green/Duwamish River system connect Ravensdale to Puget Sound.

The most rural lakes on the county monitoring program, Ravensdale is bordered mainly by private forest land, with railroad tracks running along its south shore. While a sand-mining operation located just across the tracks uses the lake as a water source, there is no development directly impacting the lake.

Alpine Fly Fishers and the Adopt-a-Stream program introduced me to Ravensdale Lake. For 2 years (1991-1993), we monitored stream flows and water quality in Ravensdale Creek. It proved to be quite healthy in general, in spite of impacts from the railroad, mining operations, and destructive off-road vehicular traffic in the stream bed itself. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 6, 1925

Constant practice makes perfect, and adherence to this truth makes the Black Diamond Mine Rescue Team one of the best. This picture shows the team with its apparatus in place and ready to enter the mine where their skill would enable them to be of invaluable assistance in case of need.

A.G. Wallace, captain of the team, was a member of the Washington Champions in 1923, which went from Black Diamond to Salt Lake City, winning third prize in the International contest held there. From left to right: Joe Bisch, Joe Meza, A. McDonald, A. Kirkbride, Fred Goldner, and A.G. Wallace. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 11, 1925

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. tour.

More than four hundred Seattle women, members of the Parent-Teacher Associations of the city, spent one hour and 25 minutes at the Briquet Plant of the Pacific Coast Coal Company last Monday. They were enroute to the Newcastle Mine, but the special train of six coaches stopped at the Briquet Plant long enough to enable Supt. Geo. N. Calkins and Foreman Clarence Gorst to show them the entire intricate process of manufacturing Diamond Briquets.

After following the raw Black Diamond and South Prairie coal through the plant to where it emerged a perfectly blended fuel in the form of briquets, the party paused by this storage pile of 12,000 tons to have its picture taken. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »