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Posts Tagged ‘Puyallup’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 17, 1924

One feature of the Pacific Coast Coal Company bunkers on Seattle Harbor, not found in many other ports, is the fact that deep sea vessels may get prompt repairs, when necessary, while bunker coal is being loaded. Immediately adjacent to the bunkers are the large shops of the Pacific Coast Engineering Company, a subsidiary of The Pacific Coast Company, whose trained men and modern equipment are capable of handling any marine repair work except dry docking.

This work is frequently performed while the ship is loading coal, and the vessel can remain in the same slip until the job is completed without interfering with other operations. The picture shows the Westward Ho, an 8,800-ton U.S. Shipping Board carrier, taking on bunkers while undergoing extensive alterations at the same time by the Pacific Coast Engineering Company. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 3, 1924

Within the past week a German freighter, the Luise Hemsoth, and a British ocean carrier, the Ashworth, both took bunker coal at the Pacific Coast Coal Company bunkers. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, September 20, 1908

Track-laying rushed in five different places on Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul in Pacific Northwest

New towns spring up along route

Rich agricultural and fruit districts heretofore remote from traffic opened up to development

1—Columbia River bridge, under construction. 2—Steamboat St. Paul, used in construction of Columbia River bridge. 3—Completed piers of Columbia River bridge. 4—Water wheel furnishing power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley. 5—Scene in the timber, Snoqualmie Valley. 6—Flume carrying water to wheel to furnish power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley.

1—Columbia River bridge, under construction. 2—Steamboat St. Paul, used in construction of Columbia River bridge. 3—Completed piers of Columbia River bridge. 4—Water wheel furnishing power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley. 5—Scene in the timber, Snoqualmie Valley. 6—Flume carrying water to wheel to furnish power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley.

Records for fast work in the construction of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway in the Pacific Northwestern states, when the line is finished next year, may, and doubtless will, be found to establish a new mark in the “winning of the West,” to use the phrase employed as the title of one of his most interesting works, by the President of the United States.

A summary of present day conditions on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul may be gained from the following. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 4, 1924

Fourth of July celebrations in Black Diamond are always started off with a parade. This picture shows the parade of last year as it left the starting point in front of the hotel for the procession to the Ball Park. The citizens of the camp vie with one another in striving to attain perfection in patriotically decorated floats and cars. This year the usual parade will be a feature of the day.

Fourth of July celebrations in Black Diamond are always started off with a parade. This picture shows the parade of last year as it left the starting point in front of the hotel for the procession to the Ball Park. The citizens of the camp vie with one another in striving to attain perfection in patriotically decorated floats and cars. This year the usual parade will be a feature of the day.

Hospitality in unbounded measure is the welcome which will be extended all who participate in the Fourth of July celebration at Black Diamond. Particular emphasis is being laid upon the fact that the children are to be given first attention, free ice cream and refreshments having been provided for every child. (more…)

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Respect for the flag is one of the first marks of patriotism. The man who can talk the loudest about the duties of citizenship often forgets to uncover when the flag goes marching by, or sits with a bored expression on his face when the national anthem is played. It is not for the flag itself, but rather for what it stands, that every true American owes due homage and respect to its starry folds.

Salute the flag! Stand at attention to the strains of The Star Spangled Banner! For thus is patriotism fostered in the youth of our land and respect for law and order maintained. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 8, 1924

Not a feminine foot faltered when the guides for this group of King County P.T.A. members led the way into the dark recesses of the Primrose Tunnel at Newcastle. These women, a portion of 300 who recently visited Newcastle Mine as the guests of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, here saw firsthand the actual processes of coal mining.

The guides for this group were, Dan Carey, Jas. E. Ash, and Phillip Chase, all of the Engineering Department. John Eck, fireboss in charge of the operations at Primrose, is kneeling at the left. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 11, 1923

Thirteen years ago the present rock dump of Mine 11, at Black Diamond, was begun. Though the mine had been in operation for many years prior to 1910, it was then that the present dump was started when the old dump caught fire. This dump is today an imposing pile of rock and waste material brought out of the mine, and it is constantly growing.

Like a small mountain it rises out of the wide expanse of the valley and is visible for a considerable distance. At night the numerous fires which blaze constantly from its base to its summit make it loom up much after the manner of the biblical Pillar of Fire. (more…)

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