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Posts Tagged ‘Ravensdale’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 21, 1986

By Herb Belanger

Don Mason, left, Carl Steiert, Ted Barner, and Bob Eaton stroll through what was Franklin. (Richard S. Heyza/Seattle Times.)

Don Mason, left, Carl Steiert, Ted Barner, and Bob Eaton stroll through what was Franklin. (Richard S. Heyza/Seattle Times.)

Tough old coal-mining towns like Black Diamond always have had their share of characters, but the “Flying Frog” is one of Carl Steiert’s favorites.

The “Frog” actually was a Belgian named Emile Raisin who ran a taxi service between Black Diamond, a company town with one bar, and Ravensdale, which had 10 saloons where miners quenched the thirst they developed toiling underground. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, May 17, 1891

J.C. Dillon crushed to death by a railroad train in a peculiar manner

Palmer, May 16 (Special) — While J.C. Dillon was at work on the track at Palmer station Friday morning the overland train came along unexpectedly.

He jumped out of the way and struck against a tripod which had been left close to the track with point toward it, so that there was only just room for cars to pass. He was crushed to death between the cars and tripod, the pulley block being jammed into his back.


Palmer was originally a telegraph station on the Northern Pacific Railway opened during the construction of the railway’s line across Stampede Pass circa 1886.

Between 1899 and 1900 the Northern Pacific built a cut-off from Palmer Junction (just east of Palmer), crossing the Green River to Kanaskat, and thence westward to Ravensdale, Covington, and finally Auburn.

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, May 6, 1906

Twenty-one teams will play among themselves until August 1, when eight highest will begin struggle

Clubs are well matched and some interesting games are sure to result—organization is now in good shape

Daniel Dugdale, the “Father of Seattle Baseball”

Daniel Dugdale, the “Father of Seattle Baseball”

The race for the Dugdale pennant and the amateur championship of Puget Sound leagues begins today, and from now on the race will be a warm one.

Nearly all the teams have been playing preliminary games, trying out players and all are now in fine shape.

There are twenty-one teams in the league, to-wit: Arlington, Anacortes, Ballard, Bremerton, Everett, Granite Falls, Kent, Black Diamond, Renton, Ravensdale, Monroe, Stanwood, Port Townsend, Fremont, West Seattle, and the Rainiers, Electrics, Giants, Superiors, and Excelsiors of Seattle.

From now until August 1 these teams will play among themselves by independent bookings and August 1 the eight leaders will play a schedule of games for the championship and pennant. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 2, 1979

By Kurt HildeBrandt

Maple Valley volunteer firemen have taken on the task of restoring this dilapidated old Howard Cooper engine into the smart, shining vehicle it was when it served Maple Valley back in the early 1950s.

Maple Valley volunteer firemen have taken on the task of restoring this dilapidated old Howard Cooper engine into the smart, shining vehicle it was when it served Maple Valley back in the early 1950s.

Many hours of volunteer work by members of the Maple Valley Volunteer Fire Fighters Association will be involved before the old 1926 Howard Cooper can be restored to the polished original condition by which it was known when it served as Maple Valley’s first fire engine back in the early 1950s.

When restoration has been completed, hopefully by 1981, the old fire truck should be a source of pride and historical significance to the entire greater Maple Valley community. (more…)

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Maple Valley Historical Society, March 1987

Here’s where me and the railroad got together.

My brother went up to Maple Valley for some reason or other and saw this gang of railroad men working to save the track that was being washed out. Being nosy, he went up to the foreman and asked if they were hiring anybody and he said yes, and get anyone else you can.

He came home and got me and we started work filling gunny sacks with sand at 4:00 p.m. and didn’t stop til 4:00 p.m. the next day. The rain never let up and gunny sacks got hard to get because everyone else needed them too for the same reason we did. We wound up using sacks that had been filled with rock salt and the salt cut our hands making them very sore. We didn’t have the little bags they use nowadays but the 100-pound size which we about two-thirds filled. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 7, 2015

By Bill Kombol

Railroads played a key role in the development of most King County towns, including Ravensdale. The arrival of the nation’s second transcontinental railway, the Northern Pacific (NP) in 1883 dramatically accelerated growth throughout the Washington Territory.

The development of a production-scale coal mine required a rail link to deliver the massive equipment needed to operate the mine and to transport the coal to market.

The extension of the Columbia and Puget Sound (C&PS) railway in 1884 from Renton by Henry Villard’s Oregon Improvement Company enabled the coal mines at Cedar Mountain (1884), Black Diamond (late 1884), Franklin (1885), and Danville (1896) to begin production. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 11, 2016

By Bill Kombol

With the Major League Baseball [season] ready to begin, it’s fun to look back over 100 years to a women’s baseball team which played for Ravensdale.

Though baseball and soccer were big sports for coal miners representing their respective mining towns, the ladies also took up bat and glove. According to Barbara Nilson’s Ravensdale Reflections, baseball games were played every Sunday at a rough field on the Landsburg Road just across from the Markus store, now known as the Ravensdale Market. (more…)

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