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Posts Tagged ‘Ravensdale’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 19, 1906

Pacific Coast Co. and Northern Pacific may come under provisions which prohibit carriers operating plants

Shipments outside Washington forbidden by the operators, but Hill line will me most seriously hurt by rule; Piles made fight to help local industries and Portland coal market to suffer if supply must be cut off

If the House agrees to the amendment made by the United States senate, forbidding common carriers from hauling coal mined in their own properties to points outside the state, the Pacific Coast Company and Northern Pacific will be seriously affected.

It was to save the coal properties of these two lines that United States Senator S.H. Piles is understood to have introduced his amendment exempting lines whose principal business is not that of a common carrier.

Just how this would have helped the Northern Pacific is not clear, but it would have been of some advantage to the Pacific Coast Company. That it was lost is believed by railroad men to have been due to the necessity for regulating the anthracite roads. The Pacific Coast Company can probably escape the provisions of the bill, but it will be a more expensive task to market the coal of that corporation. The Northern Pacific is expected to be compelled to limit its market to this state. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 7, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

Of all the “lost” towns of King County the mostly thoroughly obliterated probably is Taylor, seven miles east of Maple Valley.

Taylor, once with a population close to 700 persons, was swallowed by the Cedar River watershed. Today a young forest is springing from its streets and gardens, and the sites of the coal bunkers and kilns of its once-prosperous clay industry.

Taylor ceased to exist in 1947. Two years earlier, the Seattle Water Department had obtained a condemnation judgment permitting it to include the town in the watershed. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, April 28, 2004

By Wally DuChateau

Make no mistake about it, friends, as Seattle’s urban sprawl moves onto our Plateau, it brings county and state regulations that sound the death knell for many of our most cherished and picturesque traditions. Long-standing customs and businesses suddenly become illegal. And the newly-enforced laws frequently don’t make a lot of sense.

Take, for example, the Ravensdale Market. This old, down-home institution has been around for a century. Only God knows what the original structure was used for, but the Markus family bought the building in 1908, used horses and skids to drag it across the street to its present location, and turned it into a grocery store. It has been a community center for Ravensdale and the surrounding region ever since. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Star, April 14, 1908

One is found with bullet hole through his leg

Both confess participation in the shooting that led to the death of Kent marshal—Star staff correspondent with the posse when the men were captured—Prisoners give description of fourth man, who escaped

By G. Stuart Costello
Special Staff Correspondent

G. Stuart Costello, a member of The Star’s local staff, was the only newspaper correspondent actually with Deputy Sheriff Starwich’s posse during the hard tramp over the mountains on the trail of the murderer of Marshal Frank Miller. Other correspondents were some distance in the rear. This information does not come to The Star from Mr. Costello, who is a modest young gentleman, but comes from Deputy Sheriffs Joe Hill and Chet Belding, who reached Seattle this morning.

MARTIN, Wash., April 14—After a dramatic chase extending over 20 miles, over the crest of the Cascade mountains through Snoqualmie Pass, the posse headed by Deputy Sheriffs Matt Starwich and John Liner yesterday captured Yoven S. Borsvich, aged 23, and Nick Pettrich, aged 28, the remaining members of the gang, which on last Thursday night, shot and fatally wounded Marshal Frank Miller at Kent, and later wounded Deputy Sheriff Jack Storey in the Snoqualmie Valley.

Pettrich has a bullet hole through the lower part of his left leg and will either lose his leg or his life from blood poisoning. The man spent two days and nights barefooted in the snow of the mountains, and the wound is suppurating badly.

The wound was received in the battle with Deputies Starwich and Storey Saturday. One of Starwich’s bullets also passed through the lapel and back of the man’s coat. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 10, 2002

By Barbara Nilson

Rainbow Sparkles Campfire group of Glacier Park Elementary pause before planting flowers along the driveway at the new Ravensdale post office, April 2. Back row: Lindsay Hanson, Annie Harris, Jenny Harris, Amanda Stam, Brittany Ferguson, and Desiree MacKinnon, assistant; front row: Emily Gillmore, Kaylie Holcomb of Shadow Lake, Samantha MacKinnon, and Elizabeth Burianek. — Photo by Barbara Nilson.

Streams of visitors surveyed the spacious new Ravensdale post office, April 2, some bearing gifts to the open house. Maple Woods Polygon donated two 6-foot cedar trees, Maple Valley Campfire troop planted bulbs, and guests contributed plants.

Guests were treated to cake decorated with a picture of the post office by CJs Bakery in Black Diamond. Jim Storer, owner of CJs, donated doughnuts for the occasion. The cake noted that the post office was celebrating 100 years of existence.

Postmaster Jennie Lee Noonan mused that the community has certainly changed from the first of the of 18 postmasters to today. The number of boxes in the new post office has doubled from the 547 when Noonan started in 1995 to 1,098 now.

At the turn of the century, the company town of Ravensdale was the third largest in King County and the nearby community of Georgetown supported 11 saloons and three dance halls, catering to the miners before the disaster of 1915 killed 31 miners. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, March 30, 1988

Hang a sharp right at the Cooper Tire sign outside the Bremmeyer Logging Co. shop, breeze through a shady patch of Douglas firs, and there it squats on a distant back corner of King County’s park at Ravensdale: the Gracie Hansen Building.

She was quite a gal, this Gracie, whose bare-breasted “Girlie Revue” both wowed and outraged Seattleites at the 1962 World’s Fair.

In those days the building was known as the Paradise International Nightclub. It was the hottest thing in town.

Now it’s as desolate as an abandoned farmhouse. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Star, March 19, 1908

Hold-up man attempts to rob Maple Valley saloon, but bartender resists—robber escapes and is arrested in Seattle

After having on Tuesday night engaged in a desperate hand-to-hand fight with the bartender of Pat Quinnan’s saloon at Maple Valley, while attempting to hold up the place, as a result of which he escaped minus his coat, mask, and hat, Ben Dixon, aged 26, was captured last evening in his room at the Alaska Commercial hotel in this city. The arrest was made by Deputy Sheriff Matt Starwich and his assistant, Matt O’Grady, of Ravensdale. (more…)

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