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Posts Tagged ‘Ravensdale’

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, January 25, 1989

The First National Bank of Enumclaw is considering selling its Black Diamond branch building to the Black Diamond Community Center Board for a community center.

Dorothy Botts, secretary and treasurer for the 11-member community center board formed in 1979 by the city council, announced the proposition at the Black Diamond City Council’s regular meeting Thursday night.

“We’re really excited,” Botts said. “I talked to some of the seniors and they’re excited too.” (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 30, 1913

Principal is coming meeting of International at Indianapolis, other that of State Federation of Labor

Delegates selected by referendum vote

Nine of ten or more to go East January 15 already known—smaller unions combine to reduce expenses

By C.J. Stratton

Two big labor conventions in progress at the same time will divide the attention and interest of the union coal miners of the state of Washington next month, and three score or more of the diggers of black diamonds will have the honor of sitting in them as delegates representing the United Mine Workers of America, of which this state forms District No. 10. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, December 9, 1906

Never before in the history of Seattle, since it became a municipality, has there been such a dearth of fuel as prevails at this date.

And this statement is true, even though the State of Washington has today more standing timber, more cut lumber, and more wood ready for fuel than any other state in the union.

The coal scarcity is getting to be almost startling. The half dozen companies handling coal in Seattle are becoming dependent upon the output of a single mine—that of the Black Diamond—and a few carloads, or their equivalent, received from British Columbia. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 12, 1925

During the summer months H.H. Boyd, manager of the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s agency in Wenatchee, prepared for a big season this winter. He had the storage bins of the Wenatchee yard remodeled to permit a quicker and more economical handling of the coal. This view is from the east side, showing how the railroad cars are unloaded. Trucks can drive directly over the tracks and into the bins. Mr. Boyd is a popular citizen of Wenatchee, prominent in lodge and civic affairs. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, October 31, 1884

Editor, Post-Intelligencer:

Your correspondent was yesterday placed under great obligations to Mr. J.L. Howard, general superintendent of the Oregon Improvement Company, by reason of an invitation, obtained through the kindness of Mayor Leary, to accompany himself, Mr. Leary and Mr. A.A. Denny over the new line of railroad stretching from our city toward the Green River coal fields, and known in common parlance as the Cedar River Extension. Mr. Denny was, to the regret of all, unable to attend.

The party was under the thoughtful care of Mr. T.J. Milner, the genial assistant superintendent of the Columbia and Puget Sound Railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 29, 1925

Gathered at the face of the rock tunnel in the New Black Diamond Mine, the men responsible for the excellent work of engineering and drilling which recently was completed there, are shown in the accompanying flashlight picture. The scene shows the men at the conclusion of drilling 28 holes in the barrier of 9½ feet of solid sandstone, which the blast broke down and connected the tunnel with the gangway which had been driven from the opposite side.

From left to right, they are; D.C. Botting, Bert Cook, Barney Doyle, F. Van Winkle, T.L. Jones (discoverer of the mine) , E.L. Fortney, foreman, L. Hayden, Jas. E. Ash, Chas. Gallagher, Ben Allen, foreman, R.W. Smith, Chas. Ryan, C. Busti. (more…)

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Publication unknown, 1997

By Mike Schroeder, Ravensdale’s volunteer lake monitor

Mike Schroeder enjoys the Northwest’s treats—Ravensdale Lake, a good cup of coffee, or a ferry trip out of town.

Ravensdale Lake is a relatively shallow spring-fed lake of about 17 acres, located in southeastern King County. Averaging about 4 feet in depth, the lake is over 16 feet deep at its deepest part. Ravensdale Creek, Lake Sawyer, Soos Creek, and the Green/Duwamish River system connect Ravensdale to Puget Sound.

The most rural lakes on the county monitoring program, Ravensdale is bordered mainly by private forest land, with railroad tracks running along its south shore. While a sand-mining operation located just across the tracks uses the lake as a water source, there is no development directly impacting the lake.

Alpine Fly Fishers and the Adopt-a-Stream program introduced me to Ravensdale Lake. For 2 years (1991-1993), we monitored stream flows and water quality in Ravensdale Creek. It proved to be quite healthy in general, in spite of impacts from the railroad, mining operations, and destructive off-road vehicular traffic in the stream bed itself. (more…)

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