Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Ravensdale’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 14, 1978

By George and Dianne Wilson

Darrel and Jewell McCloud are here seen at their Black Diamond home among their gorgeous flowers which include 350 rosebushes “and much, much morel”

Darrel and Jewell McCloud are here seen at their Black Diamond home among their gorgeous flowers which include 350 rosebushes “and much, much more!”

Over 350 roses, more than 150 tuberous begonias, plus much, much more can be seen in one gorgeous spot in Black Diamond! No, it’s not a park or a nursery; it’s the home of Darrel and Jewell McCloud on 1st Street, across from the elementary school.

When the McClouds moved here 34 years ago from Ellensburg, they brought with them six or eight roses. Over the years, their collection has “grown like Topsy,” often through the Valentine’s Day gifts of rose bushes for Jewell from their son Michael. They now have 56 new roses imported from Canada. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 7, 1914

More than 15 trained corps of emergency mines men to take part in big field meet on varsity campus

Contest approved by Bureau of Mines: Director J.J. Corey, head of University Station, makes plans for first competition of kind in Washington

Self Contained Breathing Apparatus, 1917

Self Contained Breathing Apparatus, 1917

More than fifteen drilled first aid and mines rescue teams, representing nearly every coal mining company in the state, and including a team from the Northern Pacific Railroad at Cle Elum, will participate in the first contest of its kind ever held in Washington, July 22 and 23, on the cadet drill grounds on the University of Washington campus. Preparations have been going on for several weeks and final arrangements for the meet are nearly completed.

Approved by the United States Bureau of Mines and under the personal supervision of J.J. Corey, director of the Mine Rescue Station on the university campus, the meet as planned will become an annual affair. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 5, 1977

By Vince O’Keefe

Sam Abbey, 1924

Sam Abbey, 1924

The sepia-tinted photograph was 50 years old but several faces were recognized instantly—Armand Galvagno, Elmer Favro, Joe Hosko, Benny Marino, Johnny Torlai, Jerry Remolif. These were some of the Georgetown Merchants, Seattle Soccer League champions for that particular year.

There were other remembered “mugs” in the yellowed pictures and crumbling clippings—Louie Pennacchi, Jim McMillan, Benny McPhillips, Henry Tessandore, Les Lapsansky, Tom Werner, Howie Baldwin, Chink Woehrie, Tex Michel

That’s the way it was at the first official outing of the Pacific Northwest Soccer Oldtimers Association, held in Black Diamond.

For one day, at least, “The Diamond” was the Cooperstown of soccer. About 140 ex-booters, the youngest in his 50s and the oldest 91, were reunited in the little hill town southeast of Renton.

Main attraction was a collection of old photographs, trophies, and memorabilia, rounded up by Pep Peery, association secretary. By coincidence, a slimmer, black-haired Peery appeared in several of the snapshots.

Mining-community teams dominated the display: Black Diamond, McKay Coal, Ravensdale, Carbonado, Wilkeson. That’s where it all started, the diggers from Wales and England and Italy playing their favorite game in the early part of the century. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 4, 1975

(This is the third in a series of articles on historical personages written by students in Mrs. Vicci Beck’s history class at Tahoma Junior High School.)

By Bruce Jensen

Edith Johnson Wright at Peacock Station on the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, Hobart, 1911.

Edith Johnson Wright at Peacock Station on the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, Hobart, 1911.

The following article is from an interview with Edith Wright who has lived in Hobart since 1909. The interview proved very fruitful, with Mrs. Wright being a veritable storehouse of facts about Hobart in the early 1900s. I had no trouble in obtaining the information from her and enjoyed the interview very much.

Edith Wright

Mrs. Wright’s father was one of the most colorful and influential figures in Hobart’s history, Oscar “Strawberry” Johnson. He was a leader by nature, and did much to improve the Hobart area.

In 1907 he bought the remaining 80 acres of the Clifford homestead and began raising strawberries. The first year, he planted two or three acres, but later he planted more. Penny Clifford peddled the berries in Taylor, Ravensdale, Black Diamond, and Issaquah. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 19, 1962

The fair’s millionth visitor, from Ravensdale, was pleased. From left, Julius Braun, Mrs. Mary Scott, Mrs. Evalyn Van Vliet, Joseph E. Gandy. —Times Staff photo by Vic Condiotty.

The fair’s millionth visitor, from Ravensdale, was pleased. From left, Julius Braun, Mrs. Mary Scott, Mrs. Evalyn Van Vliet, Joseph E. Gandy. —Times Staff photo by Vic Condiotty.

The 1,000,000th visitor to the World’s Fair—a widow from Ravensdale—entered the fairgrounds at 12:35 o’clock this afternoon.

The lucky woman was Mrs. Evalyn Van Vliet, 28.

She was stopped as she was about to enter the north (Mercer Street) gate.

Mrs. Van Vliet was greeted by Joseph E. Gandy, fair president.

People waiting to enter at the gate exclaimed over her luck and then began counting how far they had been from the turnstile.

Mrs. Van Vliet said she has no children.

She was accompanied by Julius Braun, 30, a truck driver from Ravensdale, who was immediately behind her. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 18, 1972

By John J. Reddin

A group of Black Diamond old-timers held a “little get-together” in the Black Diamond Eagles’ Hall Saturday for their old buddy, “Catfish.”

To thousands of Seattleites “Catfish” is better known as Ed Banchero, popular owner of E & E Meats, 1007 Olive Way, one of the city’s biggest meat wholesalers and restaurant suppliers as well as shipper of frozen meat to customers throughout Alaska.

But to those who have known Banchero ever since he was born in a log cabin near what is now the center of Black Diamond and later almost drowned in nearby Lake 14, he forever after was known as “Catfish.” (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 23 and 30, 1975

By Laura Lorenz

Modern-day fireman George Raffle, shown above with the moving stock of the Maple Valley Fire Department (King County District 43), is understandably proud of today’s fire station and its equipment. It all started back in 1950 when three citizens went together to sign a $500 note. (Voice photo by Kevin McLellan)

Modern-day fireman George Raffle, shown above with the moving stock of the Maple Valley Fire Department (King County District 43), is understandably proud of today’s fire station and its equipment. It all started back in 1950 when three citizens went together to sign a $500 note. (Voice photo by Kevin McLellan)

The Maple Valley Fire Department grew from a dream to actuality in the spring of 1950 when a $500 note was signed by Joe Mezzavilla, Bill Mitchell, and Frank Sayers to obtain a 1926 Howard Cooper fire engine truck from the city of Blaine, Washington. The remaining one-half of the truck’s cost was gathered by numerous citizens’ donations. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »