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Posts Tagged ‘Ravensdale’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 23, 1978

Hard at work on the mini-park to-be near the Reader Board in central Maple Valley are these two members of the Plant and Wish Garden Club, left to right, Betty Sahlin and Helen Cook. Several community groups have offered their help—manually and financially—and more such aid is needed before the park can blossom.

Hard at work on the mini-park to-be near the Reader Board in central Maple Valley are these two members of the Plant and Wish Garden Club, left to right, Betty Sahlin and Helen Cook. Several community groups have offered their help—manually and financially—and more such aid is needed before the park can blossom.

A mini-park right in “downtown” Maple Valley, so to speak, is the current goal of three community organizations—the Maple Valley Lions’ Club, the Plant and Wish Garden Club, and the Maple Valley Historical Society.

The Lions are interested in bringing their bus shelter and reader board project to a close. About 25 more hours of work are needed, reports Johnny Markus of Ravensdale, to place a roof over the reader board to protect the lighting, build storage space for the reader board letters, do some remaining concrete work, and wire in the lights.

The historical group is eyeing the abandoned residence on the site, owned by Burlington Railroad. It would make an ideal place, members believe, for a museum.

The garden club is hard at work developing the mini-park itself on the triangular lot between the Maple Valley-Hobart Road and Highway 169.

Already plastic and chips have been laid on a section of the park and the ground smoothed for more plastic and chips. Robert Sloboden, James Daoust, Robert Smith, and Joe Wicks helped their garden club wives with this phase of the work.

The Slobodens’ sons also assisted. The gardeners especially thank Joe Wicks for the use of his back-hoe, the county for the chips, and those who started the mini-park ball rolling with monetary contributions.

The latter includes, so far, Gordon Gaub of the Maple Valley Food Center ($20) and the Maple Valley Lions Club ($50).

The garden club ladies are asking for more donations and are planning on planting trees and shrubs as soon as the weather permits.

The whole community is welcome to participate in the project.

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 4, 1978

Residents and neighbors of the Selleck-Kangley community in southwestern King County are calling a Townhall Meeting on Tuesday, Oct. 10 at 8 p.m. in the Selleck schoolhouse to “deal themselves into the dispute over the Selleck water system,” according to conveners of the meeting.

At the conclusion of the meeting a vote will be taken to register the consensus of the community.

Owners of the Selleck water system have been ordered by the King County Superior Court to carry out 28 directives of the King County Health Department. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 2, 1969

Maple Valley firemen will seek voter approval of a $65,000 bond issue on the Nov. 4 ballot, spokesmen announced this week.

The measure would allow for improvements and additional equipment at the Maple Valley and Ravensdale stations.

At the Maple Valley site a parking lot would be constructed and on the site of the old laundromat a new truck depot would be built for still another improvement—a completely equipped rescue vehicle. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, September 14, 1989

They will be serving punch and cookies and shooting basketballs Saturday at the Gracie Hansen Community Center, a far cry from the days of whiskey sours and topless dancers.

After more than a decade of dormancy, the building that Gracie graced is ready to strut its stuff as a community center. During the 1962 Seattle World’s Fair, it was the home of the Paradise International Club, famous for its topless dancers.

King County has scheduled a ribbon-cutting ceremony and open house from noon to 5 p.m. at the steel and concrete building just off the Kent-Kangley Road at 272nd Avenue Southeast in Ravensdale. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Herald, September 12, 1913

starwich_1910Because J.M. Pott, a surveyor of Tacoma, had located the new incorporation of Ravensdale on range 7 E, instead of range 6 E, where it actually is, the town finds itself in a pretty tangle and faces the necessity of unscrambling itself municipally.

About a month ago the citizens incorporated as a municipality of the 4th class. The mayor and other officials took office and Matt Starwich, a deputy sheriff, opened a saloon in a tent.

Now, since the discovery of the dreadful mistake has been made, Matt must close his saloon and Ravensdale must consider itself re-attached to the unorganized territory of King County.

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, September 9, 1900

Want ten cents per car more

Outside or common laborers asked for a raise from S2.25 to $2.50 a day—coal mine owners declare that the property will lie idle if they cannot find men willing to work for the old wages

As a result of the denial of their demand for an increase of wages 150 miners in the employ of the Seattle-San Francisco Railway & Navigation Company, at Leary, this county, went out on a strike Friday. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS The Bugle, May 1999

By Margie Markus

Some things we remember about Selleck. I gathered some of my information from articles I have on Selleck. Some came from my memories and my mother’s memories (Eva Litras).

This school was destroyed by fire on December 31, 1929. (Photo courtesy of Art Van Bergeyk.) The “new” Selleck School was built in 1930 on the same site.

This school was destroyed by fire on December 31, 1929. (Photo courtesy of Art Van Bergeyk.) The “new” Selleck School was built in 1930 on the same site.

Growing up as a little girl I lived at Elkcoal (mining town). It was about five miles from the town of Selleck.

I have many fond memories of growing up in that area and going to school at Selleck grade school which had first to the eighth grade, and then to Enumclaw to high school.

The original schoolhouse suffered a devastating fire in 1929. It was rebuilt in 1930 on the same site and is currently being used as an office and shop. (more…)

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