Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Ravensdale’

Originally published in the Valley Daily News, September 4, 1987

By Debra Nelson

Les Van Hoof is one of the new breed of coal miners who operate the levers of heavy equipment rather than picks and shovels. (Staff photo by Gary Kissel.)

Les Van Hoof is one of the new breed of coal miners who operate the levers of heavy equipment rather than picks and shovels. (Staff photo by Gary Kissel.)

Coal mining… the words evoke images of dark mine shafts, dynamite, and hardy men, exhausted from the hazards of blasting the mineral from deep within the earth, ravaged by black lung disease.

The old folk song “Sixteen Tons” tells that story—of men who rarely saw the sun and whose blood and sweat made coal the major industry in the Black Diamond region until the 1920s.

But those were the “good old days” of coal mining and, fortunately, the industry has undergone radical changes. For one thing, today’s miners work above ground, in the hot summer sun and the cold winter rain.

This Labor Day weekend, Black Diamond looks back at the old days, remembering those pioneers and miners who settled the town. The festivities include the kind of fun and games many pioneer kids enjoyed. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 11, 2007

By Kathleen Kear

Labor Day Program 2007

To read the article, “Back at the Stump: A Labor Day Reflection,” about the formation of the Black Diamond coal miners’ union in 1907, click here.

The fun began on Saturday, Sept. 1st, and ran all the way through Labor Day, Sept. 3rd, with each day filled with all sorts of activities the whole family could enjoy.

There was the annual softball game with the fire/police team trying hard to beat the community only to have the community come back and take the win.

There was also the nostalgic sock hop at the newly dedicated Black Diamond gym, Black Diamond Museum tours full of fascinating historical items and information, the dedicating of the city’s first skate park, pancake breakfast, peanut wagon and ice cream, BBQ luncheon, button raffle drawing, watermelon and pie-eating contests, and field games to boot.

The parade was filled with bunches of kids as well as adults on bikes, floats, with their pets, in cars, on tractors, and big rigs. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 20, 1902

He may be in the woods near Sawyer Lake or he may be miles away—No one knows

Harry Tracy mugshot

Harry Tracy mugshot

Tracy has apparently dropped as completely out of sight as though the earth had opened and swallowed him. Since his disappearance from the cabin on the shores of Lake Sawyer last Wednesday afternoon, or night, no trace of him has been had.

His long silence and failure to appear at some house for food and clothing lends weight to the opinion of Sheriff Cudihee that Tracy is still in hiding in the vicinity of the lake. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 18, 1902

Everything moved out and no scent for the hounds

Detailed story of the chase of the past few days

By Larris Cain

Harry Tracy mugshot

Harry Tracy mugshot

The elusive Tracy has again given Sheriff Cudihee and his posse of picked men the slip, and has succeeded in escaping from one of the most cleverly laid plans to effect his capture that has been resorted to since his escape from the Oregon penitentiary.

Since last Saturday Tracy has occupied a deserted cabin on the east shore of Lake Sawyer, which is situated about midway between Covington, a small station on the Palmer cut-off, and Black Diamond. No more ideal hiding place could have been selected, for it is located in the heart of a wilderness which it is almost impossible to penetrate.

No more strategic location could have been desired, as it stood on a high part of the bank of the lake, which gave its occupant a sweeping view of that body of water; and any one approaching the cabin from that side could have been seen for at least a mile up and down its shores. To the rear is a wild forest with here and there a small path almost invisible on account of the recent growth of small brush. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 17, 1902

Since Saturday morning Tracy has been hiding in the woods near Covington with two or three companions—He has been unable to travel owing to the wounds which were inflicted by Deputy Bunce—To prevent blood poisoning wounds were lanced by one of his pals

(Copyrighted, 1902, by C.B. Blethen,)

Harry TracyThe Times Special Service
BLACK DIAMOND, Thursday, July 17.—Tracy has again escaped. He has succeeded in eluding the Sheriff of King County and a posse of picked men who advanced on his hiding place three and a half miles from here last night, under the best program that has been formulated at any time during the chase.

The posse arrived at Tracy’s hiding place six or eight hours after he had left. He had taken a rowboat and had gone to the east side of Sawyer Lake, presumably about 2 o’clock this morning, accompanied by his two confederates. Sheriff Cudihee and the posse returned to Black Diamond at 2 o’clock this afternoon.

The chase from this point has been abandoned. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 16, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

This huge sawmill was the center of the Wood & Iverson operations in Hobart from 1913 to 1941. The mill pond was in the foreground. The site now is an area of swampy ground which will be crossed by a new road.

This huge sawmill was the center of the Wood & Iverson operations in Hobart from 1913 to 1941. The mill pond was in the foreground. The site now is an area of swampy ground which will be crossed by a new road.

Memories are becoming more dear to the pioneers of this area as progress changes the very face of the land.

For instance, where the new Primary State Highway No. 2, Echo Lake Branch, now under construction, will cross a stretch of swampy ground on a viaduct near Hobart, east of Maple Valley, a large mill once made the countryside echo with the sound of saws and the blast of its whistle summoning men to work.

The highway climbs along Holder Creek Canyon through vestiges of a forest that fed its logs to the Wood & Iverson mill from 1913 to 1941. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Times, July 5, 1963

From left—Laura Sherrard, Gracie Hansen, and Marcia Deveraux

From left—Laura Sherrard, Gracie Hansen, and Marcia Deveraux

Although the World Fair’s Paradise International Club will become a place of fun in Ravensdale, it will not quite recapture its old atmosphere, Gracie Hansen said yesterday.

Mrs. Hansen flew to Ravensdale from an engagement in Ocean Shores to dedicate her old showplace—moved to Ravensdale from the fairgrounds—as a County Park Department “activity center.”

“But you’ll never be able to replace the sex and cotton candy,” Gracie complained. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »