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Posts Tagged ‘Ravensdale’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 5, 1911

Giuseppe Piztorasi assessed $100 and $6.50 costs for conducting sporty nuisance at Black Diamond

Deputies on trail of explosion suspects

Racket made by several hundred Italians at Black Diamond at one of their national sports, cheese rolling, led to the arrest early Sunday morning of Giuseppe Piztorasi, who yesterday paid a fine of $100 and $6.50 costs for conducting a nuisance. Piztorasi was fined Monday by Justice of the Peace William W. Davis, and said that he would not pay the fine. But he concluded to do so yesterday morning just as Deputy Sheriff Joseph C. Hill was about to step upon the train with him to come to the county jail.

Hill and Deputy Sheriff Scott Malone have been staying at Black Diamond investigating the explosion of giant powder that wrecked the little home of Rasmus Christiansen, assistant superintendent of the Pacific Coast Coal Company. Blowing the ceiling from over the bed in which Christiansen, his wife, and baby were asleep. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, March 30, 1911

Deputy sheriffs forced to beat back ominous mob which surrounds shack used as jail

Dynamiting outrage followed by demonstration in which citizens take part as peace officers

1—The wrecked Christiansen home. 2—Where dynamite was exploded. 3—Interior of home after explosion. 4—Rasmus Christiansen. 5—Deputy Hill, at left, jailing a suspect at Black Diamond.

One hundred and fifty Italians, displaying all the voluble excitability of their race when in a dangerous mood, formed an ominous cordon about the little wooden shack that serves as a jail at Black Diamond yesterday afternoon when deputy sheriffs, after scouring the mining town all day, took into custody seven of their countrymen among whose number the authorities believe will be found one or more responsible for the dynamite outrage perpetrated on the home of Rasmus Christiansen early yesterday morning. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, March 29, 1911

Dynamiters try to kill family, wrecking home

Whole town aroused by loud detonation

Their lives the object of a vengeful attempt to blow them into eternity, Mrs. and Mrs. Rasmus Christiansen, of Black Diamond, early this morning escaped the death planned for them only because the five or more sticks of giant powder planted alongside their home by the unidentified assassin was beneath a section of the house far removed from that where they were sleeping.

Although the partitions of the house were blown out, and it was left an entire wreck, none of the Christiansens was hurt. Their escape was due to the fact they slept in a room that received the least of the shock, and that its force was broken by the springs and mattress of the bed. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 27, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The families of Hobart pioneers, Rudolph and Julie (Gradishnick) Grady and Olga (Grady) and Rudy Petchnick, will be featured at the Sunday, April 15th reunion at the Hobart Community Church, at 1:30 p.m. The program is sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, March 7, 1984

Coal mining plan faces opposition

By Louis T. Corsaletti
Times suburban reporter

Bill Kombol, manager of Palmer Coking Coal Co. in Black Diamond, stands amid a stand of Douglas fir trees on reclaimed land that was part of the McKay Surface Mine in 1974-1976. The pit mine was dug as deep as 40 feet in some places to reach coal. Richard S. Hevza/Seattle Times

Douglas firs ranging from a foot to 10 feet high grow branchtip to branchtip along two narrow strips of generally clear land near Black Diamond.

A few short years ago these same corridors, hewn out of second- and third-growth forest, were sliced open to extract black diamonds—coal. The open ugly sores were the Palmer Coking Coal Company’s McKay and Gem Surface Mines. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 6, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The original depot at Kanaskat built in 1912 and destroyed by fire in 1943. — From the Museum of History and Industry and loaned by Ruth Eckes.

The old railroad towns of Palmer and Kanaskat once thrived across the Green River from each other, Palmer on the north and Kanaskat on the south; eight miles southeast of Enumclaw. Somewhere along the line the two lost their identities. Apparently, the post office located in Palmer burned and the authorities moved it to Kanaskat but left the name of Palmer. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, March 1, 2003

By Jon Hahn

Jim and Candace Storer have enjoyed creating delicious treats at their bakery in Black Diamond. They have owned the store since 1995.

Black Diamond bakers’ hours don’t bother Jim Storer because he’s always been an early riser.

Before he was old enough to clean his father’s Kent bakery before and after school, he was up before dawn to deliver a Seattle Post-Intelligencer paper route.

Nowadays he’s up and working well before the 4 a.m. opening of his CJs Bakery on the north edge of Black Diamond. “We don’t mind being ‘the other Black Diamond bakery,'” he said, referring to the older and more widely known bakery and restaurant in the heart of this community’s old downtown. (more…)

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