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Posts Tagged ‘Renton Coal Co.’

Originally published in The Seattle Star, January 20, 1912

One of the Denny-Renton plants at Renton.

One of the Denny-Renton plants at Renton.

No review of Seattle’s industrial enterprises and activities would be complete without an adequate mention of the Denny-Renton Clay & Coal Company, one of the largest enterprises of its kind in the world. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, December 2000

By Barbara Nilson • Photos by Sherrie Acker

Bill and Irene (Maes) Bogh, Tahoma class Taylor class of 1939, at the Taylor program.

Bill and Irene (Maes) Bogh, Tahoma class Taylor class of 1939, at the Taylor program.

Taylor as a company town was discussed at the reunion Oct. 17. Dale Sandhei said he thought they had it better than a lot of people at that time—they had a sewer system, pumped in water, electricity, and the coal was delivered to their homes.

The company was very benevolent; they built a swimming pool and cleaned it out once a year. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 2, 1913

Lawless malcontents fire into company hotel and attempt to tear down stockade at open camp

Corporation employee gets bullet in foot

Bayne hotel

Bayne hotel

One non-union employee was shot, a rifle bullet shattering his foot, and an attempt was made to tear down the stockade gate and fence at the open-shop Bayne mine of the Carbon Coal & Clay Company, forty miles southeast of Seattle, last night.

It was the climax to a day of demonstration during which more than 1,000 members of the United Mine Workers of America had assembled outside the stockade to register a protest against the non-union status of the employees on the other side of the fence. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 8, 1922

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

Pacific Coast Coal Co. Logo 1922For the purpose of this paper, the Cedar River coal area will include the coal mines and coal beds discovered and developed at Renton and vicinity, and also at Cedar Mountain. These two areas are properly within the Cedar River watershed.

Renton district

As stated in a previous paper, coal was found on Black River in the vicinity of Renton in 1853 by Dr. M. Bigelow. A small mine was opened and coal was shipped by boat down Black River, then along the Duwamish River to Seattle, but in 1855 an Indian outbreak occurred in which two of the men interested in the project were killed, and the mine was abandoned. (more…)

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Originally published by the Renton Chronicle, October 2, 1963

By Morda Slauson

MINE ENTRANCE FOUND - Interested in mines for more than 50 years, “Judge” J.E. McFarland is intrigued by what lies underneath the surface of the ground. When he heard the entrance to the old Renton Coal Co. mine had been uncovered, he was one of the first to visit the site. Though his mining interests in Alaska, Canada and Eastern Washington have been concerned with gold, silver and other metals, rather than coal, he still is captivated by the sight of any mine.

MINE ENTRANCE FOUND – Interested in mines for more than 50 years, “Judge” J.E. McFarland is intrigued by what lies underneath the surface of the ground. When he heard the entrance to the old Renton Coal Co. mine had been uncovered, he was one of the first to visit the site. Though his mining interests in Alaska, Canada and Eastern Washington have been concerned with gold, silver and other metals, rather than coal, he still is captivated by the sight of any mine.

Forty-five years ago Walt Reid, well known Renton businessman and member of the city council, turned off the power and stopped the pumps in the Renton Coal Company mine at the foot of Talbot Hill.

Last week R.L. Moss & Co. of Zenith, working on the Tukwila freeway [today’s I-405] which will cross the Benson road just above the mine site, uncovered the main entrance to the old mine. Heavy timbers and a gate guard this tunnel mouth which, according to Reid, goes straight in on the level for 1,000 feet and then down at a 15 degree pitch for 5,280 feet.

The huge shovel working on the freeway first uncovered the tunnel outside the gate and then began to scoop out old coal cars, wheels, scrap iron and large squared timbers. Water poured out of the mine and formed the pool, still standing six to eight feet deep in front of the entrance.

Many members of old time Renton families have driven up the hill to look at what was once Renton’s main industry. (more…)

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