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Posts Tagged ‘rescue apparatus’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 7, 1914

More than 15 trained corps of emergency mines men to take part in big field meet on varsity campus

Contest approved by Bureau of Mines: Director J.J. Corey, head of University Station, makes plans for first competition of kind in Washington

Self Contained Breathing Apparatus, 1917

Self Contained Breathing Apparatus, 1917

More than fifteen drilled first aid and mines rescue teams, representing nearly every coal mining company in the state, and including a team from the Northern Pacific Railroad at Cle Elum, will participate in the first contest of its kind ever held in Washington, July 22 and 23, on the cadet drill grounds on the University of Washington campus. Preparations have been going on for several weeks and final arrangements for the meet are nearly completed.

Approved by the United States Bureau of Mines and under the personal supervision of J.J. Corey, director of the Mine Rescue Station on the university campus, the meet as planned will become an annual affair. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 20, 1917

wilkeson-depot

Frantic efforts are being made to reach six men caught in workings of colliery in Wilkeson

WILKESON, Thursday, Dec. 20 – Under the direction of pit bosses, mine superintendents, the state mine inspector, and a representative of the United States Bureau of Mines, every man who could find room to work has been laboring to reach the entombed Wilkeson miners since they were cut off Tuesday night. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, November 8, 1910

Experts to decide rescue operations

With representatives of miners’ local, they will determine whether work shall be continued—Company prepared to adopt recommendation

One of the rescuers, Vitalis Marckx—fourth from the left—was supposed to work that fateful Sunday.

One of the rescuers, Vitalis Marckx—fourth from the left—was supposed to work that fateful Sunday.

BLACK DIAMOND, Tuesday, Nov. 8—The question of proceeding with the work of endeavoring to rescue bodies of the fifteen men caught in the Lawson slope explosion on Sunday morning, is finally to be settled tonight at a meeting of state mining experts and leaders of the Black Diamond local of United Mine Workers, according to G.W. Mertens, superintendent of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, and secretary to J.C. Ford, president of the Pacific Coast Coal Company. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 17, 1921

Thirty-four win mine rescue and first aid diplomas at Newcastle: Six of the successful candidates are shown in the picture.

Thirty-four win mine rescue and first aid diplomas at Newcastle: Six of the successful candidates are shown in the picture.

Look ‘em over!

On the first page of the Bulletin today is a photograph of six of the miners who have qualified for certificates as members of the Mine Rescue Team at Newcastle.

Seven others won diplomas for the same team, but were at work in the mine when the photographer was there, and could not come out to have their pictures taken. So we’ll print their photographs sometime in the near future.

Twenty-one miners qualified for the First Aid team, and the Bulletin hopes to be able to show their pictures also as soon as the camera man can get around to it. Affairs are a trifle mixed just now, and if some of the news features are printed in fragments the editor hopes his readers will forgive him for it. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 7, 1922

The photograph here presented is that of the mine rescue team as it was organized before “Ted” Rouse, inside foreman, was transferred to Black Diamond. Those in the picture, reading from left to right, are: Back row, Howell, Stewart, Cooney, Lloyd, and “Ted” Rouse. Front row, Eberhardt, Cunningham, and O’Reilley.

The photograph here presented is that of the mine rescue team as it was organized before “Ted” Rouse, inside foreman, was transferred to Black Diamond. Those in the picture, reading from left to right, are: Back row, Howell, Stewart, Cooney, Lloyd, and “Ted” Rouse. Front row, Eberhardt, Cunningham, and O’Reilley.

Issaquah is not forgetting the serious aspects of mining, while perfecting its ball team, making arrangements for entertainments, and making plans adding to the attractiveness of life in the camp.

The camp’s mine rescue and first aid teams are practicing regularly, and do not expect to take second place when the inter-camp exhibition takes place, probably some time in August.

It was with deep regret that the news of “Ted” Rouse’s transfer to Black Diamond was received at this camp. Ted was universally liked here. He is a square-shooter and has won a good reputation among the men. We hope the change will bring him greater opportunities, of course. He carries with him the sincere good wishes of all.

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By Michael Brathovde

Transcript from the ceremony commemorating the 100th anniversary of the November 16, 1915 Ravensdale mine explosion—November 16, 2015, 11 a.m., at Ravensdale Park

Michael Brathovde

Michael Brathovde, with help from his wife, Donna, logged more than 2,000 hours of volunteer research on the town of Ravensdale.

I’d like to take you back 100 years, to November 16th, 1915. That Tuesday morning dawned cold and drizzly—a typical mid-November day.

The miner families living in the company houses of Ravensdale and the private homes in Georgetown awoke to an expectation of another typical day.

Wives cooked breakfast and packed lunch for their miner husbands, and readied their children for school. Single miners living in the huge company bunkhouse in the business district of town just south of the railroad tracks, crossed the street to the company mess hall for their breakfast and to pick up their lunches. And approximately 150 miners trekked up the trail behind town, under the coal processing plant that dominated the business district, and up to the mine entrance, where they climbed aboard man-cars and the hoisting engineer lowered them down into the Ravensdale No. 1 Mine. (more…)

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Originally published in the October 2009 BDHS newsletter

By JoAnne Matsumura

Self Contained Breathing Apparatus, 1917

Self Contained Breathing Apparatus, 1917

This 1917 example of the Draeger “Self Contained Breathing Apparatus” became the first safety apparatus demonstrated at the 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition. It also sparked the first University of Washington Safety building and courses in the use of this apparatus. The Pacific Coast Company contributed $633.80 towards the project.

The history of breathing apparatus dates back at least to 1853 of a portable machine for a prize competition of the Belgian Academy of Science. In 1903 the Draeger apparatus appeared in Germany. The Philadelphia & Reading Coal & Iron Co., of Pennsylvania, and the Anaconda Copper Mining Co., of Butte, Montana, was among the first companies in the United States to provide rescue apparatus at their mines, making these installations about 1907. The apparatus was designed to provide good air for at least 2 hours, “no matter how bad the surrounding air may be.” In 1912 the Bureau of Mines discontinued the helmet headpiece, yet allowed its limited use as late as 1923. Prior to 1923 Washington State mining codes required rescue apparatus to be a part of the equipment at mines of a certain size and character.

On July 1, 1910, Congress established the United States Bureau of Mines. They developed “seven railroad safety training cars” and equipped them with mine safety equipment. An example of this railroad safety training car was featured in the Society’s 1984 Calendar.

Read a related story from a report by D. C. Botting, 1910 State Mine Inspector of Coal Mines, by clicking here. (more…)

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