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Posts Tagged ‘resorts’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 1, 1926

Black Diamond has always maintained a reputation for turning out championship teams in baseball, but in the season which just closed, the camp held the distinction of honoring two soccer football teams, both of whom made splendid records.

In the group shown above are gathered the following players: Front row, left to right, “Chick” Thompson, Chas. “Red” Towers, A. Maroni, R. Durnac, John Ogden; second row, Chas. Maroni, Jas. Strang, Vic Roberts; back row, P.J. Gallagher, J.T. Hollow, and “Boots” Pierotti. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 28, 1926

New Black Diamond Mine was visited by the representatives of the Sales Department as a part of the two-day program last week. In the mine the salesmen saw visual evidence of the company’s confidence in the future of the coal industry. The picture of the group was taken at the face of the gangway after they had walked in from the main entrance. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 4, 2002

By Barbara Nilson

The Tahoma baseball team of 1940 was largely made up of Ravensdale residents. They are: (front row) Gino Tedesco, Frank Primozich, Bob Lang, Gene Collins, Wally Habenicht, unknown, and Larry Krall; (second row) Otto Moore, coach; Frank Pooleskie and Louie Wallace; (back row) Frank Pichinini, Walt Olsen, Charles Fore, Kal Tantari, Bill Sweeney, Ed Kuhuski, and Tommy Lee — Photo compliments of the Maple Valley Historical Society

Memories will be flying fast and furious, Sunday, Sept. 15, as folks gather for the annual Ravensdale Reunion, 1 p.m., at the Maple Valley Community Center, corner of Witte Road S.E. and S.E. 248th St. The reunion is sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society.

No program is planned for the afternoon, just a chance to get-together over a cup of coffee and visit, share introductions and a tale or two over the open mic. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, May 2000

By Barbara Nilson

Photos by Sherrie Acker

The “action” in the 1920s to 1950s, from Seattle south, was at the lake resorts in the Valley. Memories of those glory days were shared at the March program with Dolores Gaffney and Janet Bertagni talking about Gaffney’s Lake Wilderness resort, and Gloria Foss remembering the family’s resort on Shadow Lake.

Lake Wilderness resorts

Attending the historical society program on resorts were, from left, Janet Bertagni, Dolores Gaffney Judge, and Bernadine Gaffney Gebenini.

Dolores Gaffney, daughter of Tom Gaffney, reported her father and his brother Kain purchased the property on Lake Wilderness in 1926 from Abraham and Sam Cohen. The family moved to the lake and the resort opened in the spring of 1927 as Gaffney’s Lake Wilderness.

At that time there were three small family resorts on the lake. Dieckman with his two sons, Jeff and Don, had just started one, and across the lake was McKinney’s. McKinney’s also had a dance hall that was two stories high that they eventually turned into a skating rink. In April 1939 McKinneys sold their place to Gaffneys.

One of the older buildings was used for a dance hall, said Dolores, and they used kerosene lamps. In 1936 they built a new dance hall after the old one burned down. They had a 30-foot-high diving board as well as cabins, tennis courts, picnic areas, ball fields, and playgrounds.

In 1949 Diekmans and Gaffneys were combined and the Gaffneys decided to build a lodge. The design was developed by Young, Richardson and Carlson and won the grand prize from the Washington Chapter of Architects in 1951 and the top award from the American Institute in New York in 1952. The center column totem pole was carved by the famous Doug McCarter. It is 35 feet tall and weighs ten tons. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 9, 1925

Playing together for the first time this season, the soccer football squad at Newcastle has been one of the strong contenders for honors in the state league. The camp has loyally supported the boys and in turn the players have been a credit to the camp. One of the team, Bert Blondell, was chosen to play with the Washington All-Stars in the game against the All-Stars of Victoria, B.C.

In the picture, from left to right standing: Tim Riley, Jack Lucas, Don Campbell, Bert Blondell, Jock Clark, Jim Strang, Bob Gelling, Dave Forbes, Jimmy Walton, Joe Oschberger, and W.S. Hart. In front, left to right: Dan Minele, Bob Miles, C. Mikola, Arthur Kelly, Gus Lapsansky, Ted Jackson, captain of the team, Harold Phillips, Jim McCarthy, “Hen” Roberts. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 12, 1925

Peter Bertoldi is the agent for the Pacific Coast Coal Company at its Georgetown Depot. This view shows him in front of his office at 5422 Duwamish Avenue.

Black Diamond Doings

Camp to possess model ball park

Final touches have now been put on the Black Diamond baseball park, which will make it one of the finest diamonds outside of the league parks. Grass seed has recently been planted on the infield, and two new dugouts have been built, and in addition the whole field has been carefully gone over and put in A-1 shape for the season.

The recent sunshine has brought out the baseball aspirants, and judging from the early work-outs Black Diamond will have a wealth of material from which to build up a first class ball team this season.

New uniforms have been ordered, of a solid grey color, with the company trade mark on the left breast and an orange diamond with a black letter “B” on black caps. The socks are black and white. The uniforms are on display this week in the windows of Piper & Taft in Seattle. (more…)

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Originally published in Carbon River Heritage newsletter, July 1986

by Nancy Irene Hall

James L. Brummett, ex-Coast Guard officer-turned trapper, fisherman, and hunter. Jim posing with some of his furs on the dock of his Double Rainbow Lake Resort located just 2 miles east of Wilkeson on the Quinnon exit. (Photo by Nancy Irene Hall.)

James L. Brummett, ex-Coast Guard officer-turned trapper, fisherman, and hunter. Jim posing with some of his furs on the dock of his Double Rainbow Lake Resort located just 2 miles east of Wilkeson on the Quinnon exit. (Photo by Nancy Irene Hall.)

The site of the old coal mine town once called South Willis lies just a few miles east of Wilkeson on the Quinnion exit. It is now the home of Double Rainbow Resort, a 25-acre resort run by James L. Brummett. This land has seen many changes since its coal mining days.

It was named after the Northern Pacific Railroad’s young geologist Bailey Willis, who did the coal explorations for their Northern Transcontinental Survey in 1881–1884. After his explorations he gave his account of the coal in the Wilkeson, South Willis, Carbonado area in a paper entitled “Report of the Coal Fields of Washington Territory.” (more…)

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