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Posts Tagged ‘Rock Creek’

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, July 3, 1991

Bill Harp

Bill Harp says Black Diamond has changed a great deal in the 15 or so years since he last held office in his hometown.

Harp, 46, will replace Bob Selland on the Black Diamond Council. Selland resigned this spring when he moved to Eastern Washington. Harp was selected by the council and sworn in at its regular meeting Thursday night.

Harp was born and raised in Black Diamond. He works for The Boeing Co. in the flight test engineering department. (more…)

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Originally published in the Valley Daily News, June 16, 1989

By Paul E. McKelvey
Staff reporter

Rock Creek shows pollution downstream from Black Diamond Sewage Treatment Plant. (Staff photo by Duncan Livingston.)

Lake Sawyer needs a pipeline to divert pollutants and preserve its aesthetic appeal, state Department of Ecology officials said Wednesday at a meeting of residents living on or near the lake.

A pipeline from the city of Black Diamond’s sewage treatment plant at Rock Creek to Metro’s regional disposal system would channel algae-producing phosphorus away from the lake, Joe Williams, ecology department funding manager, told about 60 members of the Lake Sawyer Community Club.

“My sense is that things are coming to a point,” Williams said. “The way to go is to Metro.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 7, 2005

During the news release of the landmark agreement concerning the Black Diamond Area Open Space Protection Agreement, Black Diamond Mayor Howard Botts celebrated the announcement with King County’s Executive Ron Sims; Council Chair Larry Phillips; Council member Carolyn Edmonds, also chair of the Natural Resources and Utilities Committee; President of the Cascade Land Conservancy Gene Duvenoy; Bob Jirsa, director of Corporate Affairs, Plum Creek Timber; Donna Brathovde, Friends of Rock Creek, and representatives of the Back Country Horsemen, and a number of mountain bikers rallied together by Black Diamond Bike and Backcountry which has helped place Black Diamond on the map of mountain biking destinations. Photo by Kathleen Kear (Voice of the Valley, June 14, 2005).

Conserving 4,500 acres of open space and forests while promoting smart growth within King County’s growing communities are the impetus for a model land deal unveiled this week for the environs of the City of Black Diamond. The deal is being driven with relatively little cash and more land swapping and transfer of rights.

The Black Diamond Open Space Agreement announced this week by King County Executive Ron Sims will protect 1,600 acres of forestland known as Ravensdale Ridge, conserve 15 miles of hiking, biking, and horse trails, trigger federal funds to protect an additional 2,000 acres of forestland, contain growth within the urban area, and complement it with more than 500 acres of open space and parks within the city. (more…)

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Originally published in the Valley Daily News, April 26, 1992

By Jeff Bond
Valley Daily News

Black Diamond Public Works Director Keith Olson does a test in the town’s sewage lagoon after a break in a drainage line at the lagoon was repaired Sunday. About 700,000 gallons of sewage effluent spilled into the Rock Creek tributary of Lake Sawyer before the break could be repaired. The spill did not create a health hazard, said Larry Kirchner of the King County Department of Health. He suggests avoiding water skiing and similar activities in Lake Sawyer for the next few days and washing fish from the lake with clean water before eating them. — Valley Daily News April 28, 1992 (Photo by Garry Kissel)

BLACK DIAMOND — The city’s long-jinxed sewer system sprung a leak Friday afternoon, releasing tens of thousands of gallons of partially treated sewage into Rock Creek and Lake Sawyer. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, March 15, 1989

If all goes as planned, the citizens of Black Diamond and surrounding areas will able to walk and jog along a two-mile trail south of the city.

Eleven members of the city’s newly formed 23-member Comprehensive Plan Advisory Committee and Planning Commission met Wednesday evening to discuss future parks and recreation options for Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in the Valley Daily News, February 1, 1988

By Chuck Tiernan
Correspondent

The first steps to clear up Lake Sawyer were made public last week as consultants for the City of Black Diamond outlined the alternatives for replacement of the city’s failed wastewater treatment facility.

The early stages of two suggestions on how to deal with problems caused—or at least not corrected—by the failed sewage treatment plant were presented to the approximately 20 citizens who attended the first of three scheduled public meetings. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 30, 2007

By Kathleen Kear

Rising once again to the occasion of causing residents living around the lake concern, Horseshoe Lake, located just off the Auburn/Black Diamond Rd. outside Black Diamond, has also once again caused concern of Black Diamond residents living around Lake Sawyer.

The rising problem was brought to the attention of the City of Black Diamond staff, who have been hard at work since receiving the information three weeks ago, looking up old documents dating back to the 1990s. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 3, 1979

By Dianne Wilson

Quiet elegance, country charm, and comfortable atmosphere can all be used to describe The Dinner House, Black Diamond’s answer to the restaurant needs of the area. For the first time diners can enjoy a good meal in pleasant surroundings without driving a distance.

Last week my son Eric and I responded to the claim of “only the best.” Former patrons of Morganville Tavern would not recognize the place. Walls and ceilings are a warm, deep rose-red. Antique lovers will appreciate the authentic tables and chairs, interspersed with quality pieces including a lonely old sideboard and a china closet with beveled glass, as well as old-style bric-a-brac. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, January 30, 1983

By Eric Pryne
Times staff reporter

Coal drew hundreds of immigrants to Black Diamond in the early 1900s—three young Italians, victims of a 1910 mine explosion, are buried in the town cemetery. The mining industry might make a comeback in the area after decades of dormancy. (Barry Wong/Seattle Times)

Coal drew hundreds of immigrants to Black Diamond in the early 1900s—three young Italians, victims of a 1910 mine explosion, are buried in the town cemetery. The mining industry might make a comeback in the area after decades of dormancy. (Barry Wong/Seattle Times)

BLACK DIAMOND — Their addresses may be the same, but they really are two communities—one old, one new—in and around this historic Southeast King County town.

The coal industry built Black Diamond a century ago. It was a bustling mining town with colonies of Welshmen, Italians, Slavs, and Finns—and a population three times larger than today.

But oil replaced coal in most of America’s furnaces, and Black Diamond already had begun fading by the 1930s. Today its best known export is bread from the bakery. The hills around town produce only a pittance of coal.

Even so, the mineral’s imprint on Black Diamond is everywhere. A mountain of slag and a coal car by the highway mark the entrance to town.

A stone in the cemetery tells, in Italian, of three men who died in a 1910 mine explosion. Many of Black Diamond’s homes are old coal-company houses, built before World War I.

And, among Black Diamond’s 1,200 residents, a good number of miners still fondly remember the old days. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Times, November 10, 1963

By Lucile McDonald

When this photograph was taken, water behind the masonry dam was at a low level. Line, about midway up, indicates high water level of the reservoir.

When this photograph was taken, water behind the masonry dam was at a low level. Line, about midway up, indicates high water level of the reservoir.

One of the curiosities uncovered during freeway construction was a tar-coated 40-inch steel pipe laid down the west side of Capital Hill. Two sections were dug out and discarded for scrap, the rest was plugged with cement and left buried in the slope.

Workmen who witnessed removal of this obstacle to the path of progress may not have known they were viewing the penstock which fed Cedar River water into the first electric power plant on Lake Union. The public has forgotten thoroughly the function of a small structure hemmed in by the King County Welfare Department’s medical service office and the City Light’s stand-by steam plant at Eastlake Avenue and Nelson Place.

The building is completely empty except for a table and chairs in a room used as a voting precinct once or twice a year. If you go around in back, you can see where Lake Union once lapped at the base of the rear wall and a tail race poured out water from the Volunteer Park reservoir after its force had driven the Pelton bucket wheel of the old electric generator inside the little building.

The pipes carried the reservoir overflow down the hill, one being the penstock and the other a drain, still in use, that had been relocated at a lower level.

Through these pipes, Cedar River water mingled with Lake Union and flowed out into Salmon Bay before there was a ship canal.

The Cedar has been much manipulated by man. Its water flows into hundreds of thousands of homes and the current it generates partially lights them. It supplies most of the make-up water needed to operate the ship canal’s Chittenden Locks. (more…)

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