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Posts Tagged ‘Roslyn’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, January 15, 1906

Milwaukee practically forced to take Snoqualmie Pass and preparatory measures are all along that line

Three-mile tunnel from point near head of Lake Keechelus would insure a maximum grade of about 1 percent

Extensive coal fields reaching from Renton to Roslyn with gap at the summit, strong point in favor

Northern Pacific engineers laying out and building the Yakima & Valley Railroad have practically blocked the Milwaukee out of Naches Pass and forced the selection of the Snoqualmie gateway to the Sound. Coast officials of the new transcontinental line are making all their preparations for the use of Snoqualmie Pass and only a showing of impossibility in grades or some new advantage in Naches Pass will change the present plan.

As Milwaukee officials have now marked out the route for that line across this state, the road will connect either inside or just outside the city limits with the Columbia & Puget Sound following that road up through the Cedar River Valley and across to Rattlesnake Prairie up to that point the company will gain a maximum grade of 8/10 of one percent. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 10, 1924

Recently the Bulletin photographer succeeded in holding a group of men ready to board the man trip for a shift in Black Diamond Mine, by promising that the picture obtained would be published in the Bulletin. The gang of husky appearing miners and underground workmen seen above was the result. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 7, 1896

B.F. Bush, the newly-appointed general manager of the Northern Pacific Coal Company, with headquarters at Roslyn, will leave tomorrow to look over the situation.

He will return in a few days and expects to be relieved of his present position as general superintendent of the Oregon Improvement Company about the 20th inst. Mr. Bush only returned Saturday from a business trip to British Columbia.

Mr. Bush was appointed general manager of the Northern Pacific Coal Company by its president, J.W. Kendrick who is also general manager of the Northern Pacific railroad.

The Northern Pacific Coal Company operates the coal mines at Roslyn, at Kangley, and those at Bozeman, Mont. The company owns other coal properties which will be opened up and worked under the direction of the new general manager.

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Eagle, August 31, 1988

Annual picnic source of stories of coal, men

By Gordon Koestler

Retired miners John Streepy (left) and George Savicke shared a tale or two. (Eagle photo by Gordon Koestler.)

Retired miners John Streepy (left) and George Savicke shared a tale or two. (Eagle photo by Gordon Koestler.)

Deep within the spine of the Cascade Mountains, on either side of the summit, lie still-large coal reserves. Over the past 100 or so years, men like John Costanich, John Streepy, and George Savicke, supported by women like Mary Mihelich, have pulled the black diamonds out of mines near places like Wilkeson, Palmer, Roslyn, Carbonado, Cle Elum and, yes, Black Diamond.

Saturday, such men and women met to celebrate and remember that lifestyle at the annual Miners’ Picnic, conducted at a private park at the base of the Green River Gorge. Such luminaries as former U.S. Sen. Slade Gordon, now campaigning to return to the Senate, and Renton area state Rep. Mike Patrick thought enough of the Miners’ Picnic to attend the afternoon gathering, and King County Executive Tim Hill, 8th District Congressman Rod Chandler, and 31st District Rep. Ernie Crane were scheduled to put in appearances as well. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 27, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

Coal industry surges are an old thing to the town of Ravensdale. One such surge, in the late 1920s, brought reconstruction and modernization of the town, as shown above in a photo taken by Asahel Curtis.

Coal industry surges are an old thing to the town of Ravensdale. One such surge, in the late 1920s, brought reconstruction and modernization of the town, as shown above in a photo taken by Asahel Curtis.

“We’ve lived in coal revivals since 1915. We have spurts and then, they fall off,” observed John Markus, Sr., proprietor of Ravensdale’s principal place of business, a grocery on the Kent-Kangley Road.

The little community with the euphonious name in South King County’s coal belt is about to have another “spurt,” however. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 19, 1919

Take first place when total average counted—will go to Pittsburgh

A safety mine car invented by Joe Klansnic, circa 1920.

A safety mine car invented by Joe Klansnic, circa 1920.

A team from the Roslyn Fuel Company’s mine at Jonesville won the mine rescue and first aid contest at Black Diamond yesterday and will be sent to Pittsburgh to compete in the national mining competitions September 30 and October 1. The Roslyn team was not a good finished [sic] in the mine rescue work, but was so nearly perfect in first aid work that it overcame the early handicap and finished in front on general average. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 6, 1922

Beautiful silver cup which is held by Burnett Mine is object of competition

L.S. Campbell, captain of the Carbonado team, holding the Mine Rescue Cup won by his team in 1922.

L.S. Campbell, captain of the Carbonado team, holding the Mine Rescue Cup won by his team in 1922.

Acting in cooperation with the Federal Bureau of Mines and the State Mining Department, coal operators in Western Washington have arranged for a mine rescue and first-aid meet to be held at Burnett on Labor Day, September 4.

State Mine Inspector Abe Morris is chairman of the arrangements committee. John G. Schoning, representative of the Federal Bureau of Mines, is in charge of the program.

The meet, which is perhaps the most important held in years, is intended to include all the important coal operators in Western Washington, and invitations to participate have been sent to the following: Carbon Hill Coal Company, Carbonado; Carbon Coal & Clay Company, Bayne; Wilkeson Coal & Coke Company, Wilkeson; Fairfax Coal Company. Fairfax; Durham Coal Company, Durham; Ozark Coal Company, Cumberland; Bellingham Coal Company, Bellingham; Victory Coal Company, Centralia; Olympic Coal Company, Centralia; Ford Prairie Coal Company, Centralia; Pacific Coast Coal Company, which has mines now operating at Black Diamond, Newcastle, Issaquah, and Burnett. (more…)

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