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Posts Tagged ‘saloons’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, January 13, 1908

Men who held up saloon and killed Samuel Johnson baffle efforts of dogs and sheriff’s posses

Officers express belief that fugitives have succeeded in boarding a train and are out of country

Although numerous messages were received at the sheriff’s office today from those searching the woods in the vicinity of Kangley, where two highwaymen, while holding up the saloon of Joe Lacerdo Saturday night, shot and killed Samuel Johnson, none contained any definite information as to the hiding place of the two desperadoes. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Sunday Times, December 25, 1955

By Lucile McDonald

Promoters once saw Renton as the future site of great industrial development. This illustration was in advertising literature about 1910. The artist conceived a line of piers along the lake front and vessels entering the Cedar River. Steamers and sailing vessels were shown on Lake Washington. – Courtesy Renton Chamber of Commerce.

Promoters once saw Renton as the future site of great industrial development. This illustration was in advertising literature about 1910. The artist conceived a line of piers along the lake front and vessels entering the Cedar River. Steamers and sailing vessels were shown on Lake Washington. –Courtesy Renton Chamber of Commerce.

The man who has lived in Renton longer than any other person—John E. Hayes, 13612 S.E. 128th St—well remembers the day in December, 1897, when the first standard-gauge train reached the town. He ought to; he was firing the engine.

The Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad had bought the narrow-gauge coal line of the Seattle & Walla Walla Railroad and extended it in 1882 to Black Diamond and Franklin. It left Seattle on a right-of-way shared with the Northern Pacific, a third rail being laid to accommodate the narrow-gauge cars bound for Renton. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, November 1997

By Eva Litras

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

This is a story about the Elkcoal Mine—located off the Kangley-Kanasket Road. We moved there in 1929 and lived in a small house on Sugarloaf Mountain. (more…)

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This is a story told by Henry Walters of some of the events of his life.

He was born in England and his Father, Richard Walters, was a railroad contractor. They lived in various parts of England, moving as often as the railroad construction jobs required.

At the age of 11 he went to work as a blacksmith’s helper. He worked for three years and saved enough money to emigrate to Hamilton, Ontario, Canada in 1882. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Herald, September 12, 1913

starwich_1910Because J.M. Pott, a surveyor of Tacoma, had located the new incorporation of Ravensdale on range 7 E, instead of range 6 E, where it actually is, the town finds itself in a pretty tangle and faces the necessity of unscrambling itself municipally.

About a month ago the citizens incorporated as a municipality of the 4th class. The mayor and other officials took office and Matt Starwich, a deputy sheriff, opened a saloon in a tent.

Now, since the discovery of the dreadful mistake has been made, Matt must close his saloon and Ravensdale must consider itself re-attached to the unorganized territory of King County.

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 27, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

Coal industry surges are an old thing to the town of Ravensdale. One such surge, in the late 1920s, brought reconstruction and modernization of the town, as shown above in a photo taken by Asahel Curtis.

Coal industry surges are an old thing to the town of Ravensdale. One such surge, in the late 1920s, brought reconstruction and modernization of the town, as shown above in a photo taken by Asahel Curtis.

“We’ve lived in coal revivals since 1915. We have spurts and then, they fall off,” observed John Markus, Sr., proprietor of Ravensdale’s principal place of business, a grocery on the Kent-Kangley Road.

The little community with the euphonious name in South King County’s coal belt is about to have another “spurt,” however. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, May 1, 1889

Attempting to burglarize a cabin, he is mortally shot—betrayed by accomplice

William D. Kelly, alias Frank Murphy, was shot by Special Officer Webber, while making a burglarious entrance to the cabin of Michaely Krause, at Black Diamond, about 10 o’clock Monday night.

Kelly, who was a young man not over 30 years of age, came to Black Diamond from New York City a little over a year ago. Since that time he has been employed, off and on, by Thomas F. Smart, who has the contract for getting out timbers for the Black Diamond mines. He bore a hard name in camp and it was generally believed that he was an ex-convict. (more…)

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