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Posts Tagged ‘San Francisco’

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, August 12, 1884

James Colman (1832-1906)

James Colman (1832-1906)

“You know my business,” said a reporter, as he approached Mr. James M. Colman yesterday, pencil and book in hand, eager to learn and jot down any items of interest which that gentleman, who had just arrived from San Francisco, might be willing to give.

“Yes, I know your business. I know that you are after me for news, and I haven’t any for you.”

“Well, what have you been doing in San Francisco during the past three or four weeks?” continued the news gatherer.

“Well,” replied Mr. Colman, “while there I got out the patters and ordered a pair of direct-acting hoist engines, to be used in raising coal from the slope in our mine on Cedar River to the surface of the ground. I also ordered a sawmill, which will have a capacity of 10,000 feet of lumber per day. The lumber is to be used in and about the mine. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 13, 1904

General Manager Ford ends negotiations in southern city

J.C. Ford

J.C. Ford

Rich coal deposits on C. & P. S. Ry. transferred for $1,000,000

SAN FRANCISCO, Friday, May 13 — J.C. Ford, general manager of the Pacific Coast Company, has been in this city for some days negotiating with President H.H. Taylor for the purchase of the Black Diamond coal mines on Puget Sound.

This afternoon at the office of the Black Diamond Company a representative of The Times was told that the deal had been closed. The price named was $1,000,000. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, May 10, 1884

P.B. Cornwall

P.B. Cornwall

P.B. Cornwall, principal owner of the Black Diamond coal mines in this county, arrived from San Francisco on the Queen last evening, accompanied by his wife and son. In a brief interview with a Post Intelligencer reported last night, Mr. Cornwall said:

“We have expended a large sum of money in developing our Black Diamond mine in this county—considerably over sixty-thousand dollars—and cannot do much more until the railroad is completed to our mine. We have a contract with the Oregon Improvement Company for the transportation of our coal to Seattle, and are very much disappointed that the Cedar River extension is not being pushed ahead.

“We have made arrangements for the shipment of our coal from this city to the markets of the world, and all that is keeping us back is the failure of the Oregon Improvement Company to complete the road. We are willing to advance them sufficient money with what they have, to complete the road to our mines, and we are waiting to hear from New York now.

“I shall be on the Sound several weeks, during which time I shall visit Whatcom, to look after extensive interests at that point.”

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 13, 1988

By Louis T. Corsaletti
Seattle Times Eastside bureau

One of the Newcastle coal-mine rescue teams in 1924 included, from left, B.F. Snook (the captain), George Hasku, Walter Clark, Joe Ansberger and George Munson.

One of the Newcastle coal-mine rescue teams in 1924 included, from left, B.F. Snook (the captain), George Hasku, Walter Clark, Joe Ansberger and George Munson.

It was an economic boom that lasted for more than 50 years—one that helped put Seattle and the Eastside on the map.

And it was a force that almost overnight turned this part of the Pacific Northwest into an ethnic melting pot.

Described in newspapers of the day, it was called “coal rush” and “coal fever.”

Coal. Black diamonds. Black gold. (more…)

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Originally published in the Valley Daily News, February 8, 1993

Photo courtesy of Black Diamond Museum

Photo courtesy of Black Diamond Museum

Black Diamond got its name from the Black Diamond Mining Company of Nortonville, Calif., which in 1880 was looking for high-quality coal for its customers.

The company found Valley-area coal to be soft and low in sulphur, so tent towns were pitched and Black Diamond became king of the coal industry. (more…)

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Originally published in Eastsideweek, November 24, 1993

By David B. Buerge

Black lung, long hours, and stinking low pay: While the coal-mining business boomed on the Eastside, the underground life was a bust

Coal Creek Mine

On a mid-August night in 1929, residents of Coal Creek, west of Issaquah, watched a red glow fill the northern sky. As the ruddy light shifted and flared, miners about to go down for the graveyard shift deep in the Primrose Mine wondered aloud if Kirkland might be on fire.

But the lift bringing them back out of the mine at 7:30 that morning was more than a mile away from the entrance they’d used the night before. It was then they realized that the fire was much closer than Kirkland. They had their first look at the smoking timbers of the Pacific Coast Coal Co.’s coal bunkers and washery, which had tumbled in a charred ruin on the railroad tracks to Seattle.

Their hearts sank. (more…)

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Originally published in the Valley Daily News, October 23, 1994

By Nathalie Overland

Voters in new city will pick name, with a look back at historic roots

Pam Lee, elected to the city council in the new city, has a number of historic buildings from historic Newcastle on her land. (Valley Daily News photo by Matt Hagen.)

Pam Lee, elected to the city council in the new city, has a number of historic buildings from historic Newcastle on her land. (Valley Daily News photo by Matt Hagen.)

A walk around Pam Lee’s historic “Newcastle” home is like treading on history.

A century-old house stands as silent testimony to a time when men were proud to burrow out coal—the black gold—from the bowels of the earth.

Across the street is the final resting place of a collapsed tipple, a monstrous wooden structure that once served as a terminal to unload and clean coal.

Down another path is the gaping mouth of a mine shaft. Rendered off limits by a massive grate, the shaft now serves as a backup water supply for neighbors.

“We’ve tried to keep this valley intact so that its integrity is protected,” said Pam Lee. (more…)

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