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Posts Tagged ‘sawmill’

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, August 12, 1884

James Colman (1832-1906)

James Colman (1832-1906)

“You know my business,” said a reporter, as he approached Mr. James M. Colman yesterday, pencil and book in hand, eager to learn and jot down any items of interest which that gentleman, who had just arrived from San Francisco, might be willing to give.

“Yes, I know your business. I know that you are after me for news, and I haven’t any for you.”

“Well, what have you been doing in San Francisco during the past three or four weeks?” continued the news gatherer.

“Well,” replied Mr. Colman, “while there I got out the patters and ordered a pair of direct-acting hoist engines, to be used in raising coal from the slope in our mine on Cedar River to the surface of the ground. I also ordered a sawmill, which will have a capacity of 10,000 feet of lumber per day. The lumber is to be used in and about the mine. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 16, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

This huge sawmill was the center of the Wood & Iverson operations in Hobart from 1913 to 1941. The mill pond was in the foreground. The site now is an area of swampy ground which will be crossed by a new road.

This huge sawmill was the center of the Wood & Iverson operations in Hobart from 1913 to 1941. The mill pond was in the foreground. The site now is an area of swampy ground which will be crossed by a new road.

Memories are becoming more dear to the pioneers of this area as progress changes the very face of the land.

For instance, where the new Primary State Highway No. 2, Echo Lake Branch, now under construction, will cross a stretch of swampy ground on a viaduct near Hobart, east of Maple Valley, a large mill once made the countryside echo with the sound of saws and the blast of its whistle summoning men to work.

The highway climbs along Holder Creek Canyon through vestiges of a forest that fed its logs to the Wood & Iverson mill from 1913 to 1941. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 9, 2014

By Bill Kombol

Lake Sawyer log dump, 1928. Courtesy of University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections, C. Kinsey No. 1684

Lake Sawyer log dump, 1928

This photo by Clark Kinsey shows one of the log dumps of the Lake Sawyer Mill Company, circa 1928. This log dump facility was located on the west shore of Lake Sawyer at the current site of the Sunrise Lake Sawyer Resort. This old log dump is now a short peninsula at the resort which juts out into the lake. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 16 and 23, 1977

By Jalo Lahtinen

Self-styled stump jumper Jalo Lahtinen of Hobart, standing here along the modern version of the East Fork of Issaquah Creek, reminisces about Hobart 59 years ago in the following article and offers some reflections on the present as well as sage advice for the future. He calls his piece, “Musings of a not-to-smart stump rancher,” but we’ll leave it to the reader as to whether or not this should be taken literally. — Ed. (Photo by Bob Gerbing.)

Self-styled stump jumper Jalo Lahtinen of Hobart, standing here along the modern version of the east fork of Issaquah Creek, reminisces about Hobart 59 years ago in the following article and offers some reflections on the present as well as sage advice for the future. He calls his piece, “Musings of a not-to-smart stump rancher,” but we’ll leave it to the reader as to whether or not this should be taken literally. — Ed. (Photo by Bob Gerbing.)

When you tell someone you’re from Hobart, “Where is Hobart?” they ask.

It is at the headwaters of Issaquah Creek, the two forks known to us old stump jumpers by the following names—north fork as Holder’s Creek, east fork as Carry’s Creek.

It’s part of Cedar River Valley, nestled in the foothills of the Cascades with an eastern view of the Stampede Pass area and Mount Rainier to the south.

Once a sawmill town and farming area with self-sustaining farms and part-time stump farmers it was a paradise, a boy’s dream. Our mountains—Tiger, Taylor, and Sherwood were covered with the forest primeval, a cathedral of the Gods, an emerald jewel that God dropped in the right location, only a three-to-four mile area.

Near the summit of Sherwood is a beautiful spring two to three feet across, a trickle of the most beautiful blue water you could lay your eyes on running out of it—cold, refreshing, and thirst quenching.

Our streams were full of spawning salmon and land-locked sockeye in the fall, spawning by the hundreds. We called them red fish, cut-throat, and steelhead—no trick to catch a mess at any time. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maplevalley Messenger, February 8, 1923

Diamond drill to seek a new vein near Maplevalley

Lang and Slater installing outfit on James Maxwell place and hope to have mine producing by fall

mvmessenger_02-08-1923Maplevalley is soon to have a coal mine if the indications turn out as expected. A diamond drill is being installed on James Maxwell’s place and drilling will commence as soon as the weather permits.

Joe Lang, a mining engineer, who recently reopened the old Black River mine, has secured an option on the property. Mr. Slater a well-known geologist, has gone over the ground thoroughly and declares that there is no doubt but that coal exists here in large quantities and that it is easily accessible.

Mining operations will commence as soon as the vein is located and it is hoped that production will start next fall.

As far as can be learned, this is an independent concern and not connected with any of the big coal companies. (more…)

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Originally published in the Railway & Marine News, January 1916

The opening of the first coal mine on the far western slope of the United States, and the building of Seattle’s first railway

By I.W. Rodgers, of the Pacific Coast Coal Company
All photos courtesy Vivian Carkeek

Seattle Coal & Transportation Company’s coal bunkers, at the foot of Pike Street. Note the wilderness north of Pike. These bunkers were built in 1872, and much to the surprise of Seattle, collapsed into the bay one Sunday morning in the late ‘70s. The vessel loading coal is one of the early side-wheelers.

Seattle Coal & Transportation Company’s coal bunkers, at the foot of Pike Street. Note the wilderness north of Pike. These bunkers were built in 1872, and much to the surprise of Seattle, collapsed into the bay one Sunday morning in the late ‘70s. The vessel loading coal is one of the early side-wheelers.

Now that the oldest coal mine on the Pacific slope of the United States has just celebrated its half-century of useful service to the people of the Northwest it is interesting to turn the pages of pioneer history back to the early days and review the conditions amid which one of the state of Washington’s great industries of today had its beginnings. As a sequel to the opening of that first mine Washington has become one of the important coal producing states.

Newcastle is a famous name in the coal mining world, so it is fitting that this first mine in Washington should have been so named, and for fifty years Newcastle coal has been a standard for domestic use upon the Pacific Coast. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 27, 1964

By Lucile McDonald

This is the farm near Hobart where Bill Peacock spent his boyhood. The farm now belongs to his nephew. A rail line once ran through pasture in foreground.

This is the farm near Hobart where Bill Peacock spent his boyhood. The farm now belongs to his nephew. A rail line once ran through pasture in foreground.

From high places around Hobart, where Bill Peacock has spent 77 of his nearly 80 years, he can view the new sweep of the Echo Lake cutoff highway and automobiles traveling along it at a fast clip.

The final section penetrates foothill country that not too long ago had only roads made with pick, shovel and wheelbarrow.

Peacock used to travel a long circuit over them once a week making meat deliveries. He believes he was the first person to drive a team and wagon into some of the communities along the Pacific Coast Railroad. The branch line later was torn up and the towns are now defunct. (more…)

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