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Posts Tagged ‘sawmill’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 15, 1915

Approximately 200,000,000 feet in Cedar River watershed to be disposed of by Board of Public Works

The Board of Public Works yesterday decided to call for bids on approximately 200,000,000 feet of standing timber which the city owns in the Cedar River watershed in the vicinity of Cedar Lake. So far as known, the Pacific States Lumber Company, which has already bargained for about an equal amount of timber now owned by the Northern Pacific Railway Company, the Weyerhaeuser Company, and the United States government, will be the only bidder.

Before the timber is sold the board decided yesterday to submit all bids to the city council, that body to determine whether or not the timber shall be sold at this time at the prices offered. The city tract contains fir, hemlock, and cedar, with a considerable smaller amount of spruce.

The Pacific States Lumber Company desires to secure enough timber in the Cedar River watershed to operate one of its mills for about eight years, by logging 50,000,000 feet a year.

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 7, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

Of all the “lost” towns of King County the mostly thoroughly obliterated probably is Taylor, seven miles east of Maple Valley.

Taylor, once with a population close to 700 persons, was swallowed by the Cedar River watershed. Today a young forest is springing from its streets and gardens, and the sites of the coal bunkers and kilns of its once-prosperous clay industry.

Taylor ceased to exist in 1947. Two years earlier, the Seattle Water Department had obtained a condemnation judgment permitting it to include the town in the watershed. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, April 12, 1914

Rebuilt sawmill costs $200,00

New plant of Pacific States Lumber Company at Selleck, Wash., will begin operations June 1

Rebuilt plant of Pacific States Lumber Company at Selleck, Wash., to be opened June 1.

On the site of its old plant at Selleck, Wash., which was destroyed by fire last January 3, the Pacific States Lumber Company has just completed the building of a new sawmill at a cost of about $200,000. Work now is in progress installing the machinery, and it is expected to have the mill in operation June 1, with the capacity force of 350 men. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 2, 1925

Here may be nothing inspiring about the picture of a box car on the team track at Omak, Washington. But the significance of this scene lies in the fact that approximately seven thousand orchard heaters, designed to burn Diamond Briquets, were unloaded from that car last week.

These heaters are scattered throughout the orchards of the fertile Okanogan Valley, and in conjunction with the almost certain appearance of Jack Frost, will result in the consumption of hundreds of tons of briquets this spring where formerly briquets had never been seen. Similar shipments of orchard heaters have also recently been unloaded in the Yakima and Walla Walla fruit districts. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, September 20, 1908

Track-laying rushed in five different places on Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul in Pacific Northwest

New towns spring up along route

Rich agricultural and fruit districts heretofore remote from traffic opened up to development

1—Columbia River bridge, under construction. 2—Steamboat St. Paul, used in construction of Columbia River bridge. 3—Completed piers of Columbia River bridge. 4—Water wheel furnishing power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley. 5—Scene in the timber, Snoqualmie Valley. 6—Flume carrying water to wheel to furnish power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley.

1—Columbia River bridge, under construction. 2—Steamboat St. Paul, used in construction of Columbia River bridge. 3—Completed piers of Columbia River bridge. 4—Water wheel furnishing power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley. 5—Scene in the timber, Snoqualmie Valley. 6—Flume carrying water to wheel to furnish power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley.

Records for fast work in the construction of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway in the Pacific Northwestern states, when the line is finished next year, may, and doubtless will, be found to establish a new mark in the “winning of the West,” to use the phrase employed as the title of one of his most interesting works, by the President of the United States.

A summary of present day conditions on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul may be gained from the following. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, September 4, 1930

By J.T. Percival, Jr., resident manager, Enumclaw-Buckley territory

Photo courtesy of University of Washington Libraries, CKK0361, Clark Kinsey photographer, circa 1927

Photo courtesy of University of Washington Libraries, CKK0361, Clark Kinsey photographer, circa 1927

Some three years ago we extended our lines from the coal mining community of Fairfax to the lumbering community of Montezuma, a little more than a mile distant, where we have been furnishing power to the Manley-Moore Lumber Company for the operation of its sawmill.

This mill is a very interesting plant putting out about 18,000 feet per day of eight hours, but its logging operations are even more interesting. It was, therefore, with real pleasure that the invitation of Mr. Moore to visit the camp was accepted. (more…)

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Prepared for the membership of the PNR-NMRA, September 13, 1958

By H.A. Durfy

Coal—black diamonds—a source of heat, light, power, medicines, and many more products too numerous to mention here. This was the beginning of the Pacific Coast R.R. Co., upon which you are riding today. Of course, like other railroads, the Pacific Coast R.R. Co. was not always known by the present title, and we want to lead you through the background and the beginnings of the railroad. (more…)

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