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Posts Tagged ‘schools’

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, June 30, 1957

By H.J. Glover

Pedagogue and three generations: Mrs. Lulu Kombol (center), Selleck schoolteacher, talks with Tom Mattioda, who was in her classes years and years ago. At right is Mattioda’s daughter, Mrs. Betty Ljungdahl, also a former student. Children, now in Mrs. Kombol’s classes, are Mrs. Ljungdahl’s. They are (from left) Bruce, six; Eva Louise, seven; and Leon, eight. Mrs. Kombol has taught 52 years. — Photo by H.J. Glover.

SELLECK, June 28.— After 52 years of school teaching on these lush, green slopes of the Cascade mountains, Mrs. Lulu Kombol still is convinced there is no juvenile delinquency.

Oh, there’s delinquency all right, Mrs. Kombol firmly says, but it’s parental delinquency—the lost ends of the human universe weaning their offspring on the milk of failure.

“In this modern age of broken-homes, can-openers, liquor, and blood and thunder movies, children fail to get the idols-and-ideals, which only parents can give,” Mrs. Kombol said. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 15, 1911

Quarterly apportionment made to various districts of King County

M.E. Durham, deputy county superintendent, yesterday completed the last quarterly apportionment to the various school districts of the county. The total amount distributed was $580,572.55, of which $314,662.19 was from the state fund and $265,909.86 from the county fund. The apportionment was 7.6 cents per day’s attendance and $75 per teacher employed.

Those districts receiving more than $1,200 were: Seattle, $46,394; Renton, $9,160; Kent, $8,327; Auburn, $7,935; Foster, $4,740; Enumclaw, $4,175; Black Diamond, $4,035; Bothell, $3,918; Oak Lake, $3,805; Issaquah, $3,124; Ravensdale, $2,084; Richmond, $1,989; Kennydale, $1,833; Bellevue, $1,779; Kirkland, $1,700; Newcastle, $1,676; Redmond, $1,601; North Bend, $1,518; Des Moines, $1,520; Fall City, $1,337; Pacific, $1,218.

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, June 14, 1989

Zach Sullivan and Jennifer Drury earn the Pettersen Award. Photo by Brenda Berube.

Black Diamond Elementary School started off the succession of sixth-grade graduations June 6 with a formal ceremony that included awards and diplomas.

Black Diamond sixth-grade teacher Rich Hubber said the sixth-grade graduation is a spin-off from the old eight-grade graduation, back when graduating from the eighth-grade was as far as most students got.

“It’s part of the tradition of the school,” Hubber said. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 29, 1998

Teen drivers inspire installation near school

By Dionne Searcey
Seattle Times South bureau

Sixty years ago, the roads of the Black Diamond settlement bustled with coal miners commuting to their jobs at the nearby Pacific Coast Coal Co.

But it took dozens of teens behind the wheel to inspire installation of the tiny town’s first stoplight.

Crews from King County will install a stoplight this summer outside Kentlake High School to slow the flow of teen drivers in and out of the school parking lot that clog Lake Sawyer Road. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 27, 1926

Miss Velma Hull demonstrates the Simpson Signaling Life Line, invented by Homer Blair and used for the first time at the Mine Rescue and First Aid Meet in Burnett last Saturday. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 20, 1926

One of Black Diamond’s finest assets is its splendid high school with the fine student body pictured in the group shown above. In athletics, dramatics, and all school activities, there is a wonderful school spirit which largely accounts for the creditable showing made by Black Diamond High.

In addition, the high school is interested in First Aid training and has two teams which will compete in the annual Mine Rescue and First Aid Meet at Burnett next Saturday. Prof. Albert Weatherbee is the principal of the school. (more…)

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Originally published in The News Tribune, May 18, 1994

Coal town energizes student imagination

By Jami Leabow Farkas
The News Tribune

Not much sits now on the land off Southeast Green River Gorge Road near Black Diamond. It’s barren, save for huge trees and a few headstones that give clues to the people who inhabited the once-thriving coal mining settlement of Franklin.

But with the ongoing efforts of eighth-grade students at Cedar Heights Junior High School in Kent, that all could change by the turn of the century. (more…)

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Originally published in North Maple Valley Living, April 2020

By JoAnne Matsumura
Maple Valley Historical Society

Hello readers, how is your spelling and penmanship these days? It’s contest time. Oh, that’s right, you’ve got a computer that checks spelling and offers cursive-styled words. Your computer spell check may not always be right. Well, in the 1920s, school students had a spell check system, too. It was called The Teacher! (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 13, 1926

Scenes in the Garden of Eden could not have been more attractive than are the orchards of Wenatchee and Eastern Washington each spring when the apple trees are in full blossom. Against a background of jagged, snow-capped peaks, and nestled in the soft green of verdant clover and alfalfa, the exquisite beauty of the pale pink and white blossoms is beyond compare.

Until recently the orchardist was helpless against the blighting touch of late spring frosts, but thanks to the introduction of Diamond Briquets he is now able to protect his blossoming trees by heating his orchard. The picture shows a typical scene in the Wenatchee Valley. (Photo copyright by J.D. Wheeler.) (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 6, 1926

Thirteen years ago, in the year 1913, Black Diamond boasted a juvenile First Aid Team of which Al McBlaine, now master mechanic at Burnett, was the coach. The halftone shown herewith was made from a rather faded photograph in the possession of Supt. Paul Gallagher, of Black Diamond. But one member of this team, Paul J. Gallagher, is now in the employ of the company. Edwin Swanson, another member of the team, is a brother of Mrs. Elsie Upton, of the Accounting Department.

These First Aid boys, in Boy Scout uniforms, are still remembered for their participation in the famous Preparedness Day parade in Seattle before this country entered the World War. Those in the picture, from left to right, are; Jack Mitchell, Laurence Plano, Edwin Swanson, Donald Weston, Paul J. Gallagher, and Wm. Morgan. (more…)

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