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Posts Tagged ‘schools’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 23, 1924

School days for this year are almost over, which may account for the happy expressions in the above group. At the same time, the photographer intercepted these Newcastle youngsters on the way home after a day in the school room, and perhaps they’re thinking of a cookie jar or something good to eat out of mother’s kitchen when they get home.

The Bulletin photographer was able to identify the following in the order named: George Dunbar, Helen Bergin, Harry Berg, Muriel Morgan, Mary Jones, Verna Howson, George Clay, and Billy Dunbar. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Daily Intelligencer, May 18, 1880

One of the most convincing proofs of the steady growth and prosperity of our territory is to be found in the development and increased capacity of our coal mines. And, for an example we will take one, near at hand—the Newcastle mine—situated near Lake Washington, in the central portion of our county to demonstrate this proposition. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 10, 1924

Not all gangs which go underground at Black Diamond are bent upon breaking all known hoist records. Evidence of this is seen in the group above which one Sunday recently explored the depths of the mine, guided by Mine Foreman Theo. Rouse.

The party was arranged by Frank Bergman, mine storekeeper, who was also the photographer, which explains his absence from the group. Those in the picture are: J.E. Clarkin, Joe Malo, Mrs. J.E. Clarkin, Miss Margaret Malo, Al A. Bergman, Theo. Rouse, Miss Gilbert Malo, N S. Bergman, and Miss Theresa Malo. (more…)

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Originally published in the Washington State Historical Society’s quarterly journal, Columbia, Spring 1994

By John Hanscom

Drawing of Franklin, circa 1887.

Bird’s-eye-view map of Franklin Mine and its environs, c. 1890. (Courtesy of Don Mason and the Black Diamond Historical Society.)

Henry Villard launched the Oregon Improvement Company in October 1880 as part of his grand scheme to dominate the development of the Pacific Northwest. By 1883 he had tied the area to the national economy with the completion of the Northern Pacific Railroad. Expansive development of the Pacific Northwest seemed assured.

To fuel Villard’s steamships and locomotives, a dependable coal supply was a high priority. By February 1881 the Oregon Improvement Company had acquired the Seattle Coal and Transportation Company, including the Newcastle Mine east of Lake Washington, at a cost of one million dollars. The Seattle and Walla Walla Railroad (renamed the Columbia and Puget Sound) was also purchased for over half a million dollars to transport coal from mine to Seattle bunkers. Villard hired John L. Howard under a five-year contract at $10,000 per year as general manager of the coal business. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, November 2, 1977

By Dianne Wilson

Friendly faculty and co-workers: Front row from left, Barbara Alberts, Nellie Olson, Lois McGreen, Arlene Hubber, Mary Lee Borreson, Barbara Greenhoe. Back row from left, Richard Hubber, Jan Klemann, Maryrose Madder, Julianne McNeeley, Julie Weinbrecht, Patricia Elder, Jack Thomas (principal).

Friendly faculty and co-workers: Front row from left, Barbara Alberts, Nellie Olson, Lois McGreen, Arlene Hubber, Mary Lee Borreson, Barbara Greenhoe. Back row from left, Richard Hubber, Jan Klemann, Maryrose Madder, Julianne McNeeley, Julie Weinbrecht, Patricia Elder, Jack Thomas (principal).

What began as a reporter’s quest for an interesting feature turned into a “nostalgic trip” for me several weeks ago, when I visited the Black Diamond School. It was the first time I had been in an elementary school since my teaching days in Northern California. However, it was a delightful experience. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 27, 1978

The Hobart gym, abandoned for years and still with windows boarded and needing paint, was used successfully last season for numerous volleyball games. It now appears it may be possible it may be possible through block grants funds to restore the building and make it once again a social center for the community as it was in earlier days.

The Hobart gym, abandoned for years and still with windows boarded and needing paint, was used successfully last season for numerous volleyball games. It now appears it may be possible it may be possible through block grants funds to restore the building and make it once again a social center for the community as it was in earlier days.

The Maple Valley Historical Society at its Sept. 18 meeting discussed three possible buildings or sites in the area which might qualify for inclusion in the State Historical Register or for block grant restoration money.

The gymnasium at the old Hobart School site was deemed the most historically significant building in that area by Jane Wissel, King County Historic Site researcher. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 18, 1974

Edited by Dorothy Church

(From the Maplevalley Messenger, September 22, 1921)

A gravity water system, to run from a spring on Olaf Olson’s place to the Maplevalley school, is being considered by the school board. This would eliminate the cost of running the electric pump being used at present which does not give satisfaction. (more…)

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