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Posts Tagged ‘schools’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 27, 1978

The Hobart gym, abandoned for years and still with windows boarded and needing paint, was used successfully last season for numerous volleyball games. It now appears it may be possible it may be possible through block grants funds to restore the building and make it once again a social center for the community as it was in earlier days.

The Hobart gym, abandoned for years and still with windows boarded and needing paint, was used successfully last season for numerous volleyball games. It now appears it may be possible it may be possible through block grants funds to restore the building and make it once again a social center for the community as it was in earlier days.

The Maple Valley Historical Society at its Sept. 18 meeting discussed three possible buildings or sites in the area which might qualify for inclusion in the State Historical Register or for block grant restoration money.

The gymnasium at the old Hobart School site was deemed the most historically significant building in that area by Jane Wissel, King County Historic Site researcher. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 18, 1974

Edited by Dorothy Church

(From the Maplevalley Messenger, September 22, 1921)

A gravity water system, to run from a spring on Olaf Olson’s place to the Maplevalley school, is being considered by the school board. This would eliminate the cost of running the electric pump being used at present which does not give satisfaction. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, September 14, 1989

They will be serving punch and cookies and shooting basketballs Saturday at the Gracie Hansen Community Center, a far cry from the days of whiskey sours and topless dancers.

After more than a decade of dormancy, the building that Gracie graced is ready to strut its stuff as a community center. During the 1962 Seattle World’s Fair, it was the home of the Paradise International Club, famous for its topless dancers.

King County has scheduled a ribbon-cutting ceremony and open house from noon to 5 p.m. at the steel and concrete building just off the Kent-Kangley Road at 272nd Avenue Southeast in Ravensdale. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, August 28, 1888

Black Diamond, Aug. 25 – Everything is running smoothly, as usual. Shafts 14, 12, and 2 are running at their fullest capacity. Everybody is busy, and of course, happy.

School opened on Monday morning with an enrollment of 126 pupils, with more to come. If the present prosperity continues more school room will be needed shortly. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 10, 1983

by Herb Belanger
Times South bureau

In 1964, people were still waiting for the train In Lester. Now Burlington Northern wants to get rid of the old railroad station deep in the Cascade Mountains.

In 1964, people were still waiting for the train in Lester. Now Burlington Northern wants to get rid of the old railroad station deep in the Cascade Mountains.

The Lester depot, the 97-year-old railroad station in the Cascade Mountains, has been sold by the Burlington Northern Railroad to a Woodinville developer, Wayne Farrer Jr., for $1.

The sale was made with the stipulation that the building would be removed from the BN property by Feb. 1. What Farrer intends to do with the building was not indicated and he could not be reached yesterday for comment.

The depot has been a subject of major interest among historically minded people who feel that it should be saved as a memorial of a time when the first railroad line was punched across the Cascade Mountains opening the Puget Sound area to direct communication with the East. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 29, 1959

By John Reddin

Reminiscing: William Peacock, 73, astride his 30-year-old riding horse, Coalie, recalled the early days of Hobart School, in the background, to Steve Dickman, left, 9, and Jimmy Thompson, 10, who attended the school until it was decided recently to tear it down. Hobart school children will attend a new consolidated school near Lake Wilderness. —Times staff photo by John T Closs.

Reminiscing: William Peacock, 73, astride his 30-year-old riding horse, Coalie, recalled the early days of Hobart School, in the background, to Steve Dickman, left, 9, and Jimmy Thompson, 10, who attended the school until it was decided recently to tear it down. Hobart school children will attend a new consolidated school near Lake Wilderness. —Times staff photo by John T Closs.

While small boys romped and scuffled nearby, middle-aged parents and oldsters of Hobart, east of Maple Valley, yesterday were busy tearing down the old Hobart country school.

The four-room frame schoolhouse, with its traditional school-bell tower, long has been a landmark on the Issaquah-Ravensdale road. Built in 1909, the four-room school has served its purpose. Pupils will attend a new school under construction near Lake Wilderness under a school-district consolidation. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, June 1995

Vivian Mathison talked about her school days at the April 17th Hobart get-together sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society.

Vivian Mathison talked about her school days at the April 17th Hobart get-together sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society.

My name is Vivian Mathison. I was Vivian Kelley when I lived in Hobart from 1930 to 1939. My family moved to Hobart from Kerriston on March 17, 1930.

Our family consisted of our parents, Will and Maude Kelley, Lois, Vera, Grace, and me. Also Mike, our black and white Spitz dog given to us by the Higgins family when they moved away.

I was 10 years old when we moved to Hobart and I entered Miss Bock’s 4th grade. My special friend right away was Vivian Peterson. We were the two Vivs, and remained best friends all through school, attending Tahoma and graduating in 1938.

From my point of remembrance our family’s special friends were the W.D. Thompsons, the Lonnie Triggs, Norma Purdy, Vivian Peterson, Dave Conard, and Gerald Bartholomew. My sister Lois and Gerald, and Dave and I enjoyed going to the dances at Lake Wilderness. (more…)

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