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Posts Tagged ‘schools’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 10, 1983

by Herb Belanger
Times South bureau

In 1964, people were still waiting for the train In Lester. Now Burlington Northern wants to get rid of the old railroad station deep in the Cascade Mountains.

In 1964, people were still waiting for the train in Lester. Now Burlington Northern wants to get rid of the old railroad station deep in the Cascade Mountains.

The Lester depot, the 97-year-old railroad station in the Cascade Mountains, has been sold by the Burlington Northern Railroad to a Woodinville developer, Wayne Farrer Jr., for $1.

The sale was made with the stipulation that the building would be removed from the BN property by Feb. 1. What Farrer intends to do with the building was not indicated and he could not be reached yesterday for comment.

The depot has been a subject of major interest among historically minded people who feel that it should be saved as a memorial of a time when the first railroad line was punched across the Cascade Mountains opening the Puget Sound area to direct communication with the East. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 29, 1959

By John Reddin

Reminiscing: William Peacock, 73, astride his 30-year-old riding horse, Coalie, recalled the early days of Hobart School, in the background, to Steve Dickman, left, 9, and Jimmy Thompson, 10, who attended the school until it was decided recently to tear it down. Hobart school children will attend a new consolidated school near Lake Wilderness. —Times staff photo by John T Closs.

Reminiscing: William Peacock, 73, astride his 30-year-old riding horse, Coalie, recalled the early days of Hobart School, in the background, to Steve Dickman, left, 9, and Jimmy Thompson, 10, who attended the school until it was decided recently to tear it down. Hobart school children will attend a new consolidated school near Lake Wilderness. —Times staff photo by John T Closs.

While small boys romped and scuffled nearby, middle-aged parents and oldsters of Hobart, east of Maple Valley, yesterday were busy tearing down the old Hobart country school.

The four-room frame schoolhouse, with its traditional school-bell tower, long has been a landmark on the Issaquah-Ravensdale road. Built in 1909, the four-room school has served its purpose. Pupils will attend a new school under construction near Lake Wilderness under a school-district consolidation. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, June 1995

Vivian Mathison talked about her school days at the April 17th Hobart get-together sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society.

Vivian Mathison talked about her school days at the April 17th Hobart get-together sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society.

My name is Vivian Mathison. I was Vivian Kelley when I lived in Hobart from 1930 to 1939. My family moved to Hobart from Kerriston on March 17, 1930.

Our family consisted of our parents, Will and Maude Kelley, Lois, Vera, Grace, and me. Also Mike, our black and white Spitz dog given to us by the Higgins family when they moved away.

I was 10 years old when we moved to Hobart and I entered Miss Bock’s 4th grade. My special friend right away was Vivian Peterson. We were the two Vivs, and remained best friends all through school, attending Tahoma and graduating in 1938.

From my point of remembrance our family’s special friends were the W.D. Thompsons, the Lonnie Triggs, Norma Purdy, Vivian Peterson, Dave Conard, and Gerald Bartholomew. My sister Lois and Gerald, and Dave and I enjoyed going to the dances at Lake Wilderness. (more…)

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Originally published in The Coast magazine, June 1, 1906

The Green River above Franklin, Washington

The Green River above Franklin, Washington

June is the month and summer is the time in which to take a trip to Black Diamond and Franklin, Washington, for then the trees are green and blooming flowers fill the air with pleasing odors; for then the sportsman can whip the fish-filled Green River and lure the gamey trout from placid pools to repose within his basket; the birds fill the air with charming melodies; all nature smiles and glows with new and increasing life to shine in growing splendor; and, then, the grand snow-capped mountain—Mt. Rainier—looks more beautiful and lovely than at any other time of the year as it towers high above all its surroundings, a crystal gem of purest white, held in a setting of everlasting and eternal green. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 4, 1975

(This is the third in a series of articles on historical personages written by students in Mrs. Vicci Beck’s history class at Tahoma Junior High School.)

By Bruce Jensen

Edith Johnson Wright at Peacock Station on the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, Hobart, 1911.

Edith Johnson Wright at Peacock Station on the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, Hobart, 1911.

The following article is from an interview with Edith Wright who has lived in Hobart since 1909. The interview proved very fruitful, with Mrs. Wright being a veritable storehouse of facts about Hobart in the early 1900s. I had no trouble in obtaining the information from her and enjoyed the interview very much.

Edith Wright

Mrs. Wright’s father was one of the most colorful and influential figures in Hobart’s history, Oscar “Strawberry” Johnson. He was a leader by nature, and did much to improve the Hobart area.

In 1907 he bought the remaining 80 acres of the Clifford homestead and began raising strawberries. The first year, he planted two or three acres, but later he planted more. Penny Clifford peddled the berries in Taylor, Ravensdale, Black Diamond, and Issaquah. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 3, 1927

Carbon monoxide fumes fatal as Hobart lads change shoes in closet; Race to don clothes saves third playmate

Diplomas presented graduates while pair was trapped; absence overlooked in excitement

Hobart school students and teachers outside school entrance, 1927-1928.

Hobart school students and teachers outside school entrance, 1927-1928.

Death followed the fall of the curtain at the graduation entertainment of the grade school at Hobart, fifteen miles east of Renton, last night, when two 10-year-old school boys were overcome by carbon monoxide gas in a small closet where they were changing to their street clothes after the performance.

The dead boys are Donald Knutson, son of Mort Knutson, and Stillman Swanson, son of Mrs. John L. Swanson, a widow. The Knutson boy has been living at the home of his grandmother, Mrs. Christina Colton, since the death of his mother some years ago. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 4, 1922

Friction between Newcastle union and nonunion miners nearly causes tragedy

Newcastle School District No. 13

Friction between striking coal miners at Newcastle and nonunion men during the last few weeks almost culminated in the killing of a girl riding in an automobile with Frank Suspensick, a union miner on strike, according to Sheriff Matt Starwich. A bullet, fired from a 32-caliber automatic pistol by a school boy, narrowly missed the girl, he said.

Protest of patrons of the Newcastle School District No. 13 relative to the action of sheriff’s deputies in questioning school children in regard to their reported use of slingshots and rocks under the alleged instruction of striking miners, today led to a statement of the affair by the sheriff. (more…)

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