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Posts Tagged ‘Scotish’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 1, 1924

What more could a girl want than to enjoy the privileges of membership in the Ta-Ta-Pochon Camp Fire of Burnett? Ask any of the young ladies who appear in the group shown herewith and you’ll get an emphatic answer. California’s press agents couldn’t muster a finer bevy of feminine pulchritude in all of Mack Sennett’s legions than Burnett can boast.

From left to right they are: Ida Ellis, Audrey Parry, Margaret Murnan, Alma Johnson, Lee Dora Bumgarner, Mary Jackson, June Vernon, Hazel Miller, and Lee Miller. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 24, 1924

During Christmas week the striking window display pictured above was exhibited by the Porter Transfer & Fuel Co., of Snohomish, Washington, dealers in that city for the Pacific Coast Coal Company.

Mr. J.R. Porter is authority for the statement that the truck is loaded with two tons of Black Diamond lump. Needless to say, he has developed a thriving fuel business in Snohomish. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 8, 1923

Smoker 08-03-1922 largeNewcastle box fighters walked off with everything, winning every decision, in the big smoker staged there last Saturday night. Before a crowd of wildly howling and enthusiastic fans the gladiators went to it in rough and ready fashion, and with the exception of the tame affair between Forbes and McQuillan, every bout was all that could be asked for in the way of action. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, August 12, 1888

A community where constables and officers of the law are not needed—Remarkable progress and substantial prosperity

Drawing of Franklin, circa 1887.

Drawing of Franklin, circa 1887.

Probably the majority of the readers of the Post-Intelligencer have never inspected a coal mine or visited a town where coal mining was the exclusive industry. They have, therefore, necessarily but an imperfect knowledge of a large and very excellent class of the working population of this territory, and especially of King County.

A representative of this paper visited Franklin, in this county, a day or two ago and made some observations which may be of general interest. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, February 2, 1972

By Don Duncan

Matthew McTurk (left) and Richard H. Parry

Matthew McTurk (left) and Richard H. Parry

Richard H. Parry, stocky Welshman, turned 90 the other day. Parry and Matthew McTurk, 85, a wiry Scot, recalled the days when they almost really owed their souls to the company store.

Not in Appalachia, mind you. But right here in Washington State, where human moles burrowed into the ground at Roslyn, Black Diamond, Ravensdale, Wilkeson and Carbonado and the basement coal bin was as much a part the home as the kitchen icebox.

At times Parry and McTurk disagreed loudly on historical points—“Now you shut up and let me tell it”—but it was all noise and no heat; the disagreement of old, old friends. Afterward they embraced warmly. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 1, 1923

Drawn by Chas. Butkus

Drawn by Chas. Butkus

That the smoker scheduled for Black Diamond next Saturday night, February 3, is going to be a record-breaker, both in the crowd expected and in the excellence of the bouts, is generally conceded. In addition to the main event, a six-round tangle between Ernie Dorman of Black Diamond and J.J. Forbes of Issaquah, there are six other battles on the program.

All rounds will last for two minutes each, and with the exception of the main event the bouts are all of four rounds.

Because of an injury suffered by Len Berry in an accident this week, he will not be able to meet his brother, Bill Berry, Jr., in a four-round exhibition bout. His place will be taken by H.A. Noah, who promises to give Bill a run for his money. (more…)

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