Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Seattle Lake Shore and Eastern’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 12, 1895

And so an arrest follows

A nice question for Justice Caldwell to investigate—Thomas’ reason for refusing was not a question of color—Mason’s statement

Barber Al Thomas, who runs the O.K. barber shop on Yesler Avenue, north side, which sits in the right of way of the Seattle, Lake Shore & Eastern Railroad, refused to shave David Mason, a colored miner from Franklin, and the latter has had Thomas arrested. (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Prepared for the membership of the PNR-NMRA, September 13, 1958

By H.A. Durfy

Coal—black diamonds—a source of heat, light, power, medicines, and many more products too numerous to mention here. This was the beginning of the Pacific Coast R.R. Co., upon which you are riding today. Of course, like other railroads, the Pacific Coast R.R. Co. was not always known by the present title, and we want to lead you through the background and the beginnings of the railroad. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, November 26, 1885

The system of King County—Its cost, mileage, present and future traffic, etc.

The railroad system in King County is one of considerable magnitude now, and of rising importance. It is the largest enterprise in the county, and is doing more to increase and sustain the population than any other. Aside from the value of real estate held by the corporations, they have railroad properties in the county aggregating about $2,000,000. These properties consist of the tracks, wharves, depots, bunkers, shops, rolling stock, etc. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Issaquah Press, April 29, 1970

By Gene Woodwick

Seattle, Lake Shore and Eastern Railway’s Engine No. 2, the D.H. Gilman, photographed on Independence Day, 1895.

Seattle, Lake Shore and Eastern Railway’s Engine No. 2, the D.H. Gilman, photographed on Independence Day, 1895.

The recent merger of the railroads will soon affect the rail system through the Issaquah and Snoqualmie Valleys.

Eighty-one years ago the big news in both valleys was that the railroads were coming through. Now there would be a way to ship the hops, dairy, and forest products to markets and the area could really be opened for settlement.

In 1885 the Seattle, Lake Shore and Eastern Railroad company was formed by some citizens in Seattle, headed by Daniel Heine Gilman. (more…)

Read Full Post »