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Posts Tagged ‘Seattle’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 13, 1925

Probably the deepest beneath the earth’s surface at which a radio test was ever made, representatives of the Radio Corporation of America and Sherman, Clay Co., of Seattle, with officials of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, recently attempted to log Seattle broadcasting stations from the 12th level of Black Diamond mine. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 6, 1925

Constant practice makes perfect, and adherence to this truth makes the Black Diamond Mine Rescue Team one of the best. This picture shows the team with its apparatus in place and ready to enter the mine where their skill would enable them to be of invaluable assistance in case of need.

A.G. Wallace, captain of the team, was a member of the Washington Champions in 1923, which went from Black Diamond to Salt Lake City, winning third prize in the International contest held there. From left to right: Joe Bisch, Joe Meza, A. McDonald, A. Kirkbride, Fred Goldner, and A.G. Wallace. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 30, 1925

No feature of the First Aid and Mine Rescue Meet held last Saturday at Black Diamond attracted more attention than the exhibition in first aid and resuscitation work put on by the midget teams from Newcastle and Black Diamond. So far as is known, these two teams are the youngest First Aid teams in the world.

Fathers of the boys are miners employed by the Pacific Coast Coal Company, and the interest displayed by the youngsters is indicative of the efforts put forth by everyone to make mining safe. Members of the Newcastle team, in the front row, include Ernie Bahr, Howard Cotterill, Donald Gilbert, Clyde Joughlin, John Young, and Wm. Schuirman.

The Black Diamond boys, in the back row, are Elmon Rouse, John Gallagher, Harold Lloyd, Jr., Benny Hughes, Oliver Rouse, Jimmy Nicholson, and Ellis Ash. Harold Lloyd, Sr., trained the Black Diamond team and Wm. Jones was the instructor for the Newcastle lads. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 23, 1925

Trained Mine Rescue teams from each of the camps of the Pacific Coast Coal Company will compete for honors at Black Diamond, Saturday, July 25. The engraving shows Joe Meza, one of the Black Diamond team. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 16, 1925

First prize was awarded the Keithly Wood & Coal Company of Everett for the best industrial float in the Fourth of July parade in the Snohomish County metropolis. The Keithly Wood & Coal Company is the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s branch in Everett, and last year also won first prize in the parade. Six dappled grey horses drew the attractive float shown above, while the four young ladies garbed in black and white costumes danced before “Old King Coal” and his diminutive aides. Diamond Briquets and Black Diamond Lump were emphasized in the general design and decorations. C.O. Hilen is the manager of the company’s Everett agency. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 9, 1925

Probably the youngest First Aid Team in the world, the Black Diamond Midgets, ranging in age from 7 to 9 years, were a feature attraction at the Independence Day celebration in Black Diamond. The boys are training for an exhibition drill at the State Meet to be held July 25. Johnny Gallagher is captain of the team, the other members including Roy Hale, Jimmy Nicholson, Oliver Rouse, Harold Lloyd, Bennie Hughes, and Elmon Rouse. Harold Lloyd, Sr., is the instructor. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 7, 1937

The pig squealed and the chickens laid eggs.

And so Charles O’Shea, 29 years old, a glazier, was in the city jail today, accused of the theft off fifteen chickens and a pig from a farm near Lake Lucerne early yesterday.

Police here were notified of the theft by Kent police, who said the thief made off with the assorted livestock in an automobile. Detective Lieuts. A.T. Greathouse and M.J. Lowery, noticed a machine in Minor Avenue at Pike Street yesterday afternoon, with feathers strewn about the upholstery and eggs scattered on the back seat. They arrested O’Shea, who was the wheel. But the livestock was gone.

“The pig squealed so much he made me nervous, and the chickens laid eggs on the seats, and I released the whole outfit,” O’Shea told the officers.

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