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Posts Tagged ‘Seattle’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, January 15, 1906

Milwaukee practically forced to take Snoqualmie Pass and preparatory measures are all along that line

Three-mile tunnel from point near head of Lake Keechelus would insure a maximum grade of about 1 percent

Extensive coal fields reaching from Renton to Roslyn with gap at the summit, strong point in favor

Northern Pacific engineers laying out and building the Yakima & Valley Railroad have practically blocked the Milwaukee out of Naches Pass and forced the selection of the Snoqualmie gateway to the Sound. Coast officials of the new transcontinental line are making all their preparations for the use of Snoqualmie Pass and only a showing of impossibility in grades or some new advantage in Naches Pass will change the present plan.

As Milwaukee officials have now marked out the route for that line across this state, the road will connect either inside or just outside the city limits with the Columbia & Puget Sound following that road up through the Cedar River Valley and across to Rattlesnake Prairie up to that point the company will gain a maximum grade of 8/10 of one percent. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, January 14, 1968

So here’s to the gallant reporters,
The boys with the pencils and pads,
The calm, undisturbable, cool, imperturbable,
Nervy, inquisitive lads.

Chester (Chet) Gibbon

Chester (Chet) Gibbon

Chester (Chet) Gibbon never wanted to be anything but a newspaper reporter from the time a Maple Valley fourth-grade teacher assigned a class theme.

Young Chester, writing in longhand, lined out column rules, wrote vivid stories, and tacked on headlines. His first front page.

Gibbon now is 68, still slender and erect, and something of an oddity in our shirt-sleeves business because he always wears his suit coat. He pulled a yellowed piece of copy paper from his desk in The Seattle Times the other day. It contained the Franklin P. Adam poem (1920 vintage) from which the above lines were cribbed.

“That sort of says it,” Gibbon said. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, January 12, 1934

Payroll statement is clue that leads to recovery of loot and arrest of 3 Wednesday

Jack’s Place, ca. 1940, was located near the Green River Gorge Resort on the east side of the river.

Jack’s Place, ca. 1940, was located near the Green River Gorge Resort on the east side of the river.

A Pacific Coast Coal Company payroll statement, picked up near the service station operated by George Tethaway, at Green River Gorge proved the “clue” that led to the arrest late Wednesday afternoon of G.M. Smith, Chester Justice, and Glen Braemer, Black Diamond mine workers, and the lodging of the trio in the King County jail, awaiting probable charges of burglary.

The arrests were made by Deputy Sheriff Tom Smith of Enumclaw, Highway Patrolman Bill Ross of Buckley, and Deputy Sheriffs Allingham and Sears, of Seattle—less than twenty-four hours after Tethaway and Jack Rudgers had reported to Enumclaw police the burglary of their respective service stations at Green River Gorge. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, December 26, 1900

A Christmas Day event

Reports of tests received at city hall by telephone—Two weeks more will elapse before water is turned into the reservoirs—Assistant City Engineer Scott makes good his predictions

The Landsburg dam is used to divert drinking water from the Cedar River to the pipeline serving the City of Seattle. The original dam was constructed in 1900 and updated in 1935, as shown here. (From Black Diamond NOW.)

The Landsburg dam is used to divert drinking water from the Cedar River to the pipeline serving the City of Seattle. The original dam was constructed in 1900 and updated in 1935, as shown here. (From Black Diamond NOW.)

Cedar River water flowed into the city limits of Seattle Monday night at 10 o’clock through the mains of the new gravity system. Unknown to the general public the water from the river was let into the main pipe line filling it almost to its greatest capacity and was then allowed to flow into the main trunk sewer at Twelfth Avenue South and Lane Street, by which it found its way into Elliott Bay.

Twelve days ago Assistant City Engineer Scott , who has charge of the work on the pipe line and at the intake on the river decided if possible to carry out the prediction he made six months ago that water from Cedar River would flow into the city limits on Christmas day, 1900. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Sunday Times, December 25, 1955

By Lucile McDonald

Promoters once saw Renton as the future site of great industrial development. This illustration was in advertising literature about 1910. The artist conceived a line of piers along the lake front and vessels entering the Cedar River. Steamers and sailing vessels were shown on Lake Washington. – Courtesy Renton Chamber of Commerce.

Promoters once saw Renton as the future site of great industrial development. This illustration was in advertising literature about 1910. The artist conceived a line of piers along the lake front and vessels entering the Cedar River. Steamers and sailing vessels were shown on Lake Washington. –Courtesy Renton Chamber of Commerce.

The man who has lived in Renton longer than any other person—John E. Hayes, 13612 S.E. 128th St—well remembers the day in December, 1897, when the first standard-gauge train reached the town. He ought to; he was firing the engine.

The Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad had bought the narrow-gauge coal line of the Seattle & Walla Walla Railroad and extended it in 1882 to Black Diamond and Franklin. It left Seattle on a right-of-way shared with the Northern Pacific, a third rail being laid to accommodate the narrow-gauge cars bound for Renton. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 22, 1922

Carrying coal to Newcastle is a performance which has long been banned by a proverb, but carrying firearms from Newcastle is a thing which incurs the displeasure of the Seattle Police Department.

It also tends to disrupt the best laid plans of mice and men, especially men who are about to become married men, as Robert Allen Swaney—of Newcastle—learned to his embarrassment yesterday. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maplevalley Messenger, December 14, 1922

C.M. Drake erects mill here with a capacity of 5,000 feet per day—hardwood will be turned out

Maple and alder lumber will be manufactured in Maplevalley soon. The new sawmill, which has been installed on W.D. Gibbon’s place below the depot by C.M. Drake and Son, will be put in operation as soon as the weather permits.

The mill has a capacity of about 5,000 feet a day, states Mr. Drake.

Logging operations will be conducted by private individuals who will also deliver the logs to the mill. Several contracts have already been entered into.

The finished product will be shipped to Seattle, San Francisco, and other points by rail.

Mr. Drake formerly operated a shingle mill near Peterson Lake on the pipe line.

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