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Posts Tagged ‘Seattle’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 20, 1906

Renton, Ravensdale, and Black Diamond did not play league games last Sunday because they would not agree to play each other owing to the rivalry which exists between them. These towns are unfortunately limited to playing Seattle teams or play among themselves and as the Seattle aggregation have their hands full making the rounds, the teams from the south district are occasionally without games. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, Summer 2018

By William Kombol

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

This spring photographer Bob Dobson stumbled upon a short section of railroad hidden amongst a dense forest near Lake Sawyer. He took a photo that inspired a question: “Who laid these rusty rails?”

Little did he know the answer is the story behind the men who founded Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 18, 1924

July Fourth was a big day for Black Diamond coal and Diamond Briquets at Sedro-Woolley. On that occasion W.E. Ropes of Ropes Transfer carried off first prize in the patriotic parade with the float shown in the above engraving. Mr. Ropes has been operating in Sedro-Woolley for 14 years and he handles Pacific Coast Coal Company coals exclusively.

Some fine specimens of Black Diamond lump coal were arranged along the top of the float just under the slogan, “Heat That’s Cheap,” while along the sides appeared the word “Briquets,” spelled out with genuine Diamond Briquets themselves.

On the same day in Everett the Pacific Coast Coal Company agency there also won first prize with a beautifully decorated float, a reproduction of which appears elsewhere in this issue of the Bulletin. (more…)

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Prepared for the membership of the PNR-NMRA, September 13, 1958

By H.A. Durfy

Coal—black diamonds—a source of heat, light, power, medicines, and many more products too numerous to mention here. This was the beginning of the Pacific Coast R.R. Co., upon which you are riding today. Of course, like other railroads, the Pacific Coast R.R. Co. was not always known by the present title, and we want to lead you through the background and the beginnings of the railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 4, 1924

Fourth of July celebrations in Black Diamond are always started off with a parade. This picture shows the parade of last year as it left the starting point in front of the hotel for the procession to the Ball Park. The citizens of the camp vie with one another in striving to attain perfection in patriotically decorated floats and cars. This year the usual parade will be a feature of the day.

Fourth of July celebrations in Black Diamond are always started off with a parade. This picture shows the parade of last year as it left the starting point in front of the hotel for the procession to the Ball Park. The citizens of the camp vie with one another in striving to attain perfection in patriotically decorated floats and cars. This year the usual parade will be a feature of the day.

Hospitality in unbounded measure is the welcome which will be extended all who participate in the Fourth of July celebration at Black Diamond. Particular emphasis is being laid upon the fact that the children are to be given first attention, free ice cream and refreshments having been provided for every child. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Star, July 4, 1908

Deputy detailed to catch criminal abandons the chase

Must the law take a holiday?

If so there is a man who attempted murder in King County today who is escaping the consequences of his crime.

After a few hours of half-hearted work last night the pursuit of John Willard, aged 58, a farmer living in Maple Valley, at the foot of Cedar Mountain, who attempted murder, according to his own wife’s statement, has been dropped for the time being. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 2, 1925

William Rose is fatally wounded during battle between citizens and desperadoes in Pierce County

They stopped bank bandits. These are photographs of the posse that shot to death two bandits who held up the State Bank of Buckley yesterday afternoon and a section of the main-street in the town where the pistol battle was staged. 1—The building with white pillars on the left is the bank. The pair of bandits were slain a half-block away at a point in the center of the photograph. 2—View of the entrance to the bank, through which one of the bandits and the town marshal exchanged a volley of shots. 3—Marshal Ed. Nelson, left, and Aaron Haydon, former marshal, who fired the shots which mortally wounded the desperadoes when the revolver fight was at its height. 4—The bank officials who narrowly. escaped death at the hands of the excited robbers. Left to right they are: C.A. Stewart, assistant cashier; A.E. Hovey, cashier; C.A. Steberg, president. 5—Marshal Nelson, who headed a speedily organized posse of merchants.

They stopped bank bandits. These are photographs of the posse that shot to death two bandits who held up the State Bank of Buckley yesterday afternoon and a section of the main-street in the town where the pistol battle was staged. 1—The building with white pillars on the left is the bank. The pair of bandits were slain a half-block away at a point in the center of the photograph. 2—View of the entrance to the bank, through which one of the bandits and the town marshal exchanged a volley of shots. 3—Marshal Ed. Nelson, left, and Aaron Haydon, former marshal, who fired the shots which mortally wounded the desperadoes when the revolver fight was at its height. 4—The bank officials who narrowly. escaped death at the hands of the excited robbers. Left to right they are: C.A. Stewart, assistant cashier; A.E. Hovey, cashier; C.A. Steberg, president. 5—Marshal Nelson, who headed a speedily organized posse of merchants.

In a revolver duel which followed the first bank robbery in the history of the town of Buckley, forty miles southeast of Seattle, in Pierce County, yesterday afternoon, two unmasked, unidentified desperadoes died “with their boots on,” and William Rose, 54 years old, business man of Buckley, was fatally wounded. Rose died in the Taylor-Lacey Hospital in Auburn at 8:15 o’clock this morning.

One of the bandits was shot from the running board of an automobile speeding away with the loot. The other was killed when he drove back for the body of his dead companion. (more…)

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