Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Seattle’

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 15, 1920

Seattle motorists afforded opportunity to enjoy big variety of scenery and save on their gasoline

Pretty little resort welcomes all guests

Times’ tours party takes trip and writer describes routes and what may be seen at end of journey

These photographs show the beauties of Green River Gorge, within easy reach of motorists from Seattle. 1—Placid Deep Lake on the way to the gorge. 2—The turbulent river far below the steel bridge across the gorge. 3—The swift-moving river, perpetual agent of erosion, works its way in the gorge ever deeper and deeper between the walls of stone.

These photographs show the beauties of Green River Gorge, within easy reach of motorists from Seattle. 1—Placid Deep Lake on the way to the gorge. 2—The turbulent river far below the steel bridge across the gorge. 3—The swift-moving river, perpetual agent of erosion, works its way in the gorge ever deeper and deeper between the walls of stone.

One of most desirable features of Puget Sound motoring is that within a very short distance of Seattle there are literally dozens of beautiful runs, some long, some short, but all interesting and attractive. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 15, 1920

Washington mines boost prices to care for higher wages granted to miners recently

Following ratification last week by the mine workers’ state convention held in Seattle of the new working agreement between the Coal Operators’ Association and State District No. 10 of the United Mine Workers of America giving a general increase in wages, west side coal operators announced an upward revision of bunker prices for coal, which is now being passed on to consumers by Seattle retail fuel dealers.

Fifty cents a ton is the advance made on the grades of stove and range coal most used by Seattle householders, including the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s Newcastle and Issaquah lump-nut, which are classed as lignites. The bunker price of these lignites is now $8.50. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 13, 1908

Top row, from left to right—Rees Morgan, ss and c; George Rockefeller, lf and manager; George Ayers, 1b; A.C. Davies, secretary and treasurer; Dan Meredith, 3b and rf; Walter Newton, 3b and ss; Lew McDonald, 2b. Bottom row—Earle Davis, rf; Thomas Oughton, cf; Archie Hutcheson, umpire; Joe Ainardi, president; Dave Boyd, official score keeper; Pierpont Morgans, c; Bert Hoye, p and captain; Alvin Davis, mascot.

Top row, from left to right—Rees Morgan, ss and c; George Rockefeller, lf and manager; George Ayers, 1b; A.C. Davies, secretary and treasurer; Dan Meredith, 3b and rf; Walter Newton, 3b and ss; Lew McDonald, 2b. Bottom row—Earle Davis, rf; Thomas Oughton, cf; Archie Hutcheson, umpire; Joe Ainardi, president; Dave Boyd, official score keeper; Pierpont Morgans, c; Bert Hoye, p and captain; Alvin Davis, mascot.

The above is a picture of the undefeated Black Diamond baseball team, winners of fourteen straight games. They have defeated teams from Enumclaw, Auburn, Newcastle, and some of the fastest amateur teams of Seattle. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, August 12, 1884

James Colman (1832-1906)

James Colman (1832-1906)

“You know my business,” said a reporter, as he approached Mr. James M. Colman yesterday, pencil and book in hand, eager to learn and jot down any items of interest which that gentleman, who had just arrived from San Francisco, might be willing to give.

“Yes, I know your business. I know that you are after me for news, and I haven’t any for you.”

“Well, what have you been doing in San Francisco during the past three or four weeks?” continued the news gatherer.

“Well,” replied Mr. Colman, “while there I got out the patters and ordered a pair of direct-acting hoist engines, to be used in raising coal from the slope in our mine on Cedar River to the surface of the ground. I also ordered a sawmill, which will have a capacity of 10,000 feet of lumber per day. The lumber is to be used in and about the mine. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 3, 1983

By Herb Belanger
Times suburban bureau

Neely Mansion

Neely Mansion, located on the Auburn-Black Diamond Road, was built in 1894. The building is in the National Register of Historic Places and was the second structure placed on the county register of landmarks.

The future of two structures intimately connected to the development and early settlement in King County may hinge on two separate meetings to be held this month.

The first will be at the Auburn City Hall Monday at 7:30 p.m. when people interested in the fate of the Neely Mansion, tied to the early settlement of the Green River Valley, will meet to see if something can be done about continuing a restoration project which has been halted for lack of funds.

The second meeting will be that of the county’s Landmarks Commission, Aug. 11 at 11 a.m. in the eighth-floor conference room of the Alaska Building, Seattle, when a decision will be made on whether the railroad depot in the Cascade Mountain town of Lester should be recognized as a county landmark. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, July 1994

By Barbara Nilson
Based on taped interview by Bill McDermand in November 1993 and interview by Barbara and Edward Nilson in June 1994.

“I’m the only boy from the Valley that made it to the big leagues,” said Johnny Lazor as he displayed his 1946 championship ring, “and I’m proud of it.”

“I’m the only boy from the Valley that made it to the big leagues,” said Johnny Lazor as he displayed his 1946 championship ring, “and I’m proud of it.”

But the road to the outfield of the Boston Red Sox in the World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals wasn’t easy.

He was born in Taylor in 1912 to Veronica and Michael Lazor (pronounced Lawser in the Valley but known as Laser like the beam in baseball circles) who had immigrated from Czechoslovakia. His folks met in New York in the 1890s and went to Franklin around 1908 for his Dad to work in the mines dumping cars. They then moved to Taylor where the first of four children were born.

The oldest was Mary, born in 1908, then Mike, 1910, and Johnny was next. In 1914 the family moved onto their 20-acre farm in Hobart and the youngest boy, Vincent was born.

His folks paid $10 an acre for the farm, which they sold in 1969 to the Bill McDermand family. It is located on the old road to Taylor (S.E. 208th St.) on the north side. When his folks moved here it had all been logged off, but huge stumps remained. Lazor said it took a box and a half of powder just to blow them open. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 20, 1902

He may be in the woods near Sawyer Lake or he may be miles away—No one knows

Harry Tracy mugshot

Harry Tracy mugshot

Tracy has apparently dropped as completely out of sight as though the earth had opened and swallowed him. Since his disappearance from the cabin on the shores of Lake Sawyer last Wednesday afternoon, or night, no trace of him has been had.

His long silence and failure to appear at some house for food and clothing lends weight to the opinion of Sheriff Cudihee that Tracy is still in hiding in the vicinity of the lake. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »