Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Seattle’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 11, 1925

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. tour.

More than four hundred Seattle women, members of the Parent-Teacher Associations of the city, spent one hour and 25 minutes at the Briquet Plant of the Pacific Coast Coal Company last Monday. They were enroute to the Newcastle Mine, but the special train of six coaches stopped at the Briquet Plant long enough to enable Supt. Geo. N. Calkins and Foreman Clarence Gorst to show them the entire intricate process of manufacturing Diamond Briquets.

After following the raw Black Diamond and South Prairie coal through the plant to where it emerged a perfectly blended fuel in the form of briquets, the party paused by this storage pile of 12,000 tons to have its picture taken. (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 4, 1925

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today's Gene Coulon Park.

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today’s Gene Coulon Park.

More than million briquets made daily

In 1914 the Briquet Plant was opened and has run continuously since that time. It operates two shifts of eight hours each and produces five hundred tons of briquets a day. That means that more than one and one-half million briquets are made each day.

The briquets are made from a combination of Black Diamond and South Prairie coals. The first of these give it its free burning quality and low ash and the last, a coking coal, gives it its strength and fire holding power. The binder used is a specially prepared form of asphalt from which the stickiness has been removed.

The trip through the plant will be in the direction in which the coal is run, beginning at the point where the raw coal is received and ending at the point where the finished briquet goes into the railroad cars. (more…)

Read Full Post »

By Bill Kombol

King County Assessor tax parcel No. 112106-9035

The location of the Black Diamond branch of Mount Rainier Bank [Columbia Bank, 2019] has a short, but interesting history.

The property is located in the south half of Section 11, Township 21 North, Range 6 East, W.M. Like all odd-numbered sections in this area, the property in Section 11 was originally part of a land grant by the United States to the Northern Pacific Railroad in 1873 for construction of a transcontinental railroad. In adjacent even-numbered sections, the Black Diamond Coal Mining Company had begun mining coal after moving their operations north from the Mount Diablo coal fields near Nortonville, California, east of San Francisco. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 28, 1925

Black Diamond justly feels proud of its splendid baseball park and athletic field, with its commodious grandstand and band pavilion. Both the infield and the outfield are grass sod, making it a very fast diamond. Within the park enclosure is a large grove of trees providing facilities for picnic parties, and back of the grandstand tennis courts are being constructed.

All of the work in the park was performed by volunteers, making it in the fullest sense a community enterprise. This picture was taken on the day of the opening game, when Black Diamond and the Seattle Briquets played 16 innings before the contest ended with a score of 2 to 1 in favor of the Seattle nine. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in Northwest Nikkei, May 1994

By Ed Suguro

A 1924 photo of the Selleck Japanese community. T.Z.Maekawa is the man in the striped tie with hand in pocket, third row from top; Heiji Sakakibara is the man standing next to him. The Rev. U.G. Murphy is sitting far right third row from bottom. Mr. Abo, the foreman, is sitting in the middle with the baby.

Before World War II there were a number of company sawmill towns like Mukilteo, Snoqualmie, Selleck, Eatonville, National, Onalaska, Walvill, and Longview in which the Issei worked and the Nisei grew up.

Selleck was about 10 miles east of Maple Valley and was recognized by the King County Landmarks Commission as a historical landmark and by the National Register as a historic district. It was a company town in which the Pacific States Lumber Company, one of the largest on the West Coast, employed a number of Issei.

Among those who lived there were T.Z. Maekawa, who worked at the mill, and the Rev. Joseph Sakakibara, who grew up there until high school. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 21, 1925

When Portland, Oregon, recently held its Home Beautiful Exposition, Ralph C. Dean, manager of the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s Portland Depot, lost no time in demonstrating to the citizens of the Columbia River metropolis that Diamond Briquets were the ideal fuel to make beautiful homes comfortable as well.

This picture shows the booth which was arranged by R.R. English, city salesman, and which carried the message of Diamond Briquets to many Portland homes. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in Seattle Daily Times, May 20, 1919

Delegates from the various mining camps of the Pacific Coast Coal Company met recently in Black Diamond and formed an athletic and first aid association which promises to become a factor in the community.

The object of the association is to promote clean sport, build and equip clubhouses at the various camps, and to revive interest in healthful outdoor exercise. Two contests will be held in the near future, with prizes offered. The camps represented include Black Diamond, Newcastle, Issaquah, Burnett, Franklin, and the Seattle shops.

The following officers were selected to act as an advisory board: Ernest Newsham, honorary president; Stephen H. Green, honorary vice president; N.H. Freeman, president; Frank Rice, vice president; Dr. Mallory, treasurer; G.F. Clancy, secretary; one delegate from each camp.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »