Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Seattle’

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, October 19, 1952

Seattle Sunday Times, October 19, 1952The view of Maple Valley in autumn depicted on Page 1 of this Magazine Section appealed to Parker McAllister, Times staff artist, as most appropriate for inclusion in his series of rural scenes in the Puget Sound country. (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Northwest Post Card Club newsletter; July, August, September 2017

By Ken Jensen

Black Diamond depot, circa 1910. The train was pulled by engine No. 18 of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, which served several mining towns in King County.

Black Diamond depot, circa 1910. The train was pulled by engine No. 18 of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, which served several mining towns in King County.

For the miners and their families in turn-of-the-century Black Diamond—an isolated company town near the Cascade foothills of South King County, Washington—the 33-mile trip to Seattle was an all-day journey. The company’s railroad and circa 1885 depot, along with its general store, were the townspeople’s only real connection to the outside world.

In 1904 the Pacific Coast Co. owned all of Black Diamond—its mines, its land, its stores, pretty much everything—as well as neighboring Franklin and a handful of other King and Pierce county towns. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 14, 1923

Chemical discovered during war oxidizes carbon monoxide, making it harmless

For more than two hours yesterday prominent coal miners, superintendents, engineers, foremen, representatives of the State Mine Department, and of the Seattle Fire and Police Departments gathered at the federal mine rescue station at the University of Washington and took part in a demonstration of a new “self rescuer,” or small gas mask which will permit a man to live in air heavily impregnated with deadly monoxide gas from forty minutes to more than an hour.

The demonstration was made in a small room, into which the exhaust of the White mine rescue truck of the government was piped. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 5, 2006

By Barbara Nilson

Today only the cobblestone fireplace survives. (Photo: Ken Jensen.)

Today only the cobblestone fireplace survives. (Photo: Ken Jensen.)

In a previous article on Selleck, August 22nd, a resource said the “old cobblestone fireplace and chimney that serves as the deck of a mobile home may have been part of the camp’s cookhouse”… Not so says Mrs. Pat (Trumpour) Schaeffer, currently of Kangley.

Mrs. Schaefer moved to Selleck in 1939 when she was three years old. Her Grampa, William Trumpour, built the house where the stone fireplace still stands. He sold it around 1946 to Cliff Morris who added a room to the house and built the stone fireplace. Schaeffer recalled that Morris was wounded in the First World War and was crippled so they helped with getting the stones for the fireplace.

“I was about ten years old and my brother and I packed all those rocks from around the area. It was hard work,” she said. The house was later sold again and finally burned to the ground leaving only the stone fireplace. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, August 28, 1888

Black Diamond, Aug. 25 – Everything is running smoothly, as usual. Shafts 14, 12, and 2 are running at their fullest capacity. Everybody is busy, and of course, happy.

School opened on Monday morning with an enrollment of 126 pupils, with more to come. If the present prosperity continues more school room will be needed shortly. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Valley Daily News, August 26, 1991

By Tina Hilding

Brick works at Denny Renton Clay and Coal Company, 1909. (Photos courtesy Renton Historical Museum.)

Brick works at Denny Renton Clay and Coal Company, 1909. (Photos courtesy Renton Historical Museum.)

RENTON — North America Refractories, hidden away on a small road east of Interstate 405, seems like an ordinary small industry.

The 60-acre property off Houser Way has been for sale for a number of years and is being considered as a site for a county regional justice center.

In its heyday in the early 1900s, the factory, located on the south side of the Cedar River, was the largest paving brick plant in Washington—some say in the United States or in the world. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 25, 1957

By Lucile McDonald

Honor H. Wilhelm as he appeared in his later years.

Honor H. Wilhelm as he appeared in his later years.

Two daughters of the late Rev. Honor L. Wilhelm‚ have been going through the trunks, papers, library, and attic in a 70-year-old house at 2258 W. 61st St. trying to place in some sort of order the literary legacy of a one-time Seattle publisher.

Mr. Wilhelm, who died May 21, edited The Coast magazine from 1902 to 1910.

Mrs. Wilhelm, unable to move around much because of a hip injury, was aided by her daughters, Helen (Mrs. Arvid Sagor) of 2148 N. 63rd St. and Margaret (Mrs. Ronald L. Cripe) of Enumclaw in closing the house, which was to be sold.

In the 40 years the Wilhelms lived in it the dwelling gradually filled with the owner’s literary output. Mr. Wilhelm wrote poems for every occasion. He wrote autobiographies from his boyhood. He edited several publications. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »