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Posts Tagged ‘Seattle’

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, January 16, 1900

King County road supervisors held a well-attended and spirited convention in the library room at the court house yesterday afternoon. A permanent organization to be known as the Road Supervisors’ Association of King County was formed, and numerous speeches dealing with road matters were made. The principal suggestions referred to what is known as the trunk system of roads and broad wagon tires.

Superintendent of Streets Little, of the Seattle city government, called the convention to order, and gave way to temporary chairman W.J. Trimble, of Redmond. After W.E. Conway, A.J. Bossert, and C.H. Daniels, committee on rules and business, and James Clark, George Hummell, and David Gibbon, committee on permanent organization, had reported, the election of officers took place. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 14, 1926

This Link-Belt moveable crane is used at the Briquet Plant not only to load Diamond Briquets from the storage platform into the cars, but also to load coal from the storage piles into cars preparatory to sending it through the plant. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, January 13, 1935

Is a fortune in gold—$75,000—buried somewhere about 88-year-old Mrs. Josie Mercier’s Black Diamond home? Deputy Proscutor Carl R. Heussy and County Detective R.J. Allingham yesterday wondered if it is, while they investigated beatings Mrs. Mercier has suffered, and wondered if her refusal to tell the hiding place explained the assaults. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, January 10, 1906

Information secured by Milwaukee railroad from engineering crews now indicates that route is best

Surveyors kept in the mountains and are continuing investigations of all possible means of reaching coast

Heavy snows retarding final examination and definite announcement cannot be made until all reports are in

The Milwaukee railroad will use, according to indications, Snoqualmie Pass in crossing the Cascade Mountains, entering Seattle by way of the Cedar River Valley. If this route is finally accepted by the Milwaukee the new transcontinental line will parallel the Columbia & Puget Sound from Maple Valley into Seattle. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 7, 1926

If at first you don’t succeed, there’s a reason. Find it before you try again. — The Prism (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, January 4, 1914

Fire of mysterious origin causes $200,000 damage in mill of Pacific States Company at Selleck

Rebuilt plant of Pacific States Lumber Company at Selleck, Wash., to be opened June 1 (Seattle Times, April 12, 1914).

Fire of mysterious origin which started shortly after 7 o’clock last night in the huge plant of the Pacific States Lumber Company at Selleck, King County, totally destroyed the sawmill connected with the works and for a time threatened to wipe out the entire property and the little town of Selleck as well. As it was, the damage done according to President E.B. Shields, of the company, amounted to close to $200,000, of which 75 percent was covered by insurance. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 31, 1925

Every miner at Black Diamond probably knows the three men whose likenesses appear above. If there is one who doesn’t, he should. They represent the three phases of coal mining most vital to the industry; efficiency and economy in operation, safety inspection, and first aid and mine rescue training.

In Supt. Paul Gallagher largely rests the success or failure of the mine’s operation. Closely related is the safety inspection, directed by Deputy State Mine Inspector, Geo. T. Wake, under the able supervision of Wm. R. Reese, Chief Inspector. And last but not least is John G. Schoning, of the United States Bureau of Mines, who patiently drills the men in the principles of first aid and mine rescue work. All three indispensable. (more…)

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