Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Selleck’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, March 7, 1913

Delay in the opening of bids by the Board of Public Works for standing timber in the Cedar River watershed, insisted upon by The Times, today resulted in a bid of 51 cents a thousand above the bid of a week ago for fir timber, 60,000,000 feet of which is to be sold. The bid was submitted by the Northwestern Lumber Company, operating a large mill at Kerriston, on the Northern Pacific. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 6, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The original depot at Kanaskat built in 1912 and destroyed by fire in 1943. — From the Museum of History and Industry and loaned by Ruth Eckes.

The old railroad towns of Palmer and Kanaskat once thrived across the Green River from each other, Palmer on the north and Kanaskat on the south; eight miles southeast of Enumclaw. Somewhere along the line the two lost their identities. Apparently, the post office located in Palmer burned and the authorities moved it to Kanaskat but left the name of Palmer. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 20, 2007

The former railroad depot, built in 1886, in Black Diamond now houses the Historical Society Museum. Down Railroad Avenue the current book store is visible. It has also been King’s Tavern. — Photo by Barbara Nilson.

Featured speaker at the Maple Valley Reunion, Sunday, Feb. 25th, will be Mayor Howard Botts of Black Diamond. The 1 p.m. program at the Grange Hall on Highway 169 at 216th is sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society.

Mayor Botts, who was born and raised in Black Diamond, will relate the histories of the two towns and how they have been connected over the years by the highway, the railroad, once upon a time, as well as other similarities. He’ll also discuss, “what is coming down the road; hopefully, new homes and new businesses.”

He said, “It is always interesting to talk about my home town.” Botts has served as mayor for 24 years and before that served several terms on the City Council in the 1960s and then during the 1970s, he was a member of the Planning Community. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, January 4, 1914

Fire of mysterious origin causes $200,000 damage in mill of Pacific States Company at Selleck

Rebuilt plant of Pacific States Lumber Company at Selleck, Wash., to be opened June 1 (Seattle Times, April 12, 1914).

Fire of mysterious origin which started shortly after 7 o’clock last night in the huge plant of the Pacific States Lumber Company at Selleck, King County, totally destroyed the sawmill connected with the works and for a time threatened to wipe out the entire property and the little town of Selleck as well. As it was, the damage done according to President E.B. Shields, of the company, amounted to close to $200,000, of which 75 percent was covered by insurance. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 4, 2002

By Barbara Nilson

The Tahoma baseball team of 1940 was largely made up of Ravensdale residents. They are: (front row) Gino Tedesco, Frank Primozich, Bob Lang, Gene Collins, Wally Habenicht, unknown, and Larry Krall; (second row) Otto Moore, coach; Frank Pooleskie and Louie Wallace; (back row) Frank Pichinini, Walt Olsen, Charles Fore, Kal Tantari, Bill Sweeney, Ed Kuhuski, and Tommy Lee — Photo compliments of the Maple Valley Historical Society

Memories will be flying fast and furious, Sunday, Sept. 15, as folks gather for the annual Ravensdale Reunion, 1 p.m., at the Maple Valley Community Center, corner of Witte Road S.E. and S.E. 248th St. The reunion is sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society.

No program is planned for the afternoon, just a chance to get-together over a cup of coffee and visit, share introductions and a tale or two over the open mic. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 20, 1925

Black Diamond was visited last Saturday by Mr. Walter Barnum, president of The Pacific Coast Company, and Mr. E.C. Ward, president of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, together with vice-presidents N.D. Moore, Wylie Hemphill, and a party of staff officials.

In the absence of James Justice, Alternate Mine Council Chairman who was on shift in the mine at the time, A.W. Gray, former chairman, welcomed the officials to the camp, in which he was joined by Supt. Paul Gallagher.

The Bulletin photographer caught Mr. Gray, Pres. Barnum, Supt. Gallagher, and Pres. Ward in the order shown in the halftone above. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 16, 1925

First prize was awarded the Keithly Wood & Coal Company of Everett for the best industrial float in the Fourth of July parade in the Snohomish County metropolis. The Keithly Wood & Coal Company is the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s branch in Everett, and last year also won first prize in the parade. Six dappled grey horses drew the attractive float shown above, while the four young ladies garbed in black and white costumes danced before “Old King Coal” and his diminutive aides. Diamond Briquets and Black Diamond Lump were emphasized in the general design and decorations. C.O. Hilen is the manager of the company’s Everett agency. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »