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Posts Tagged ‘Sherwood’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, April 9, 1980

By Louis T. Corsaletti
Times suburban reporter

The dotted line shows the area to be covered by the communities plan.

The dotted line shows the area to be covered by the communities plan.

TAHOMA-RAVEN HEIGHTS — More than 115 years ago the discovery of vast coal deposits drew settlers to the remote Squak Mountain, Issaquah and Newcastle regions. But now the sprawling reserves of undeveloped land are spawning rapid growth in the 150-square mile area from Issaquah south to Black Diamond.

So last August, King County planners assisting a citizens’ committee began the tremendous task of planning for the future of what is called the Tahoma/Raven Heights Communities Plan area—the largest plan undertaken so far.

A recently prepared profile on Tahoma/Raven Heights shows that between 1970 and 1980, the population has grown from about 19,500 to about 26,000. And forecasts indicate a population of almost 40,000 by 1990. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Times, April 2, 1961

(This is the first in a series of articles which will appear from time to time about lost towns of King County.)

By Lucile McDonald

Overlooking the site of the mining community of Cedar Mountain is a window on the south side of the home of Mrs. Edith Cavanaugh. On the table were deeds to the Cavanaugh land, signed by Presidents Grant and Arthur. —Times photo by Roy Scully.

Overlooking the site of the mining community of Cedar Mountain is a window on the south side of the home of Mrs. Edith Cavanaugh. On the table were deeds to the Cavanaugh land, signed by Presidents Grant and Arthur. —Times photo by Roy Scully.

Lost towns of King County rival in mystery the ghost towns of gold-mine country. The thing about them is that most have vanished without a trace—not so much as a weathered heap of timber or a false-front abandoned store to indicate that at this or that road junction stood a community of several hundred persons.

Any map of 50 years ago or more is sprinkled with place names where nothing to indicate a community exists today. Some of them were swallowed by the Cedar River watershed. Others died from natural causes.

Who could find Taylor, Kerriston, Cedar Mountain, Sherwood, Eddyville, and Barneston today? Who would know about Henry’s Switch, Atkinson, Trude, Holmar, Herrick, Danville, and Durham?

Yet, these names remain on the map, monuments to another time, when coal mines and sawmills attracted population to the foothills of the Cascades. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 27, 1964

By Lucile McDonald

This is the farm near Hobart where Bill Peacock spent his boyhood. The farm now belongs to his nephew. A rail line once ran through pasture in foreground.

This is the farm near Hobart where Bill Peacock spent his boyhood. The farm now belongs to his nephew. A rail line once ran through pasture in foreground.

From high places around Hobart, where Bill Peacock has spent 77 of his nearly 80 years, he can view the new sweep of the Echo Lake cutoff highway and automobiles traveling along it at a fast clip.

The final section penetrates foothill country that not too long ago had only roads made with pick, shovel and wheelbarrow.

Peacock used to travel a long circuit over them once a week making meat deliveries. He believes he was the first person to drive a team and wagon into some of the communities along the Pacific Coast Railroad. The branch line later was torn up and the towns are now defunct. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 3, 1903

pacific_coast_ss_co_flyer_croppedAccording to a statement issued by the Pacific Coast Company, the gross earnings of the Pacific Coast Steamship Company for the past year show an increase of $66,934.31 over the preceding year. The various routes operated have all contributed satisfactory increases, with the exception of the Southeastern Alaska and Nome routes, which show a decrease over former seasons owing to competition.

During the year the Port Hartford Wharf, owned by the Pacific Coast Railway Company, the Skagway Wharf, owned by the Alaska Southern Wharf Company, and the Juneau Wharf, owned by the Pacific Coast Company, were this year leased to and operated by the Pacific Coast Steamship Company. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 22, 1978

By Ruby Ziegner

Anna Gruenes Conover looks back over 83 eventful years in the Hobart-Sherwood-Taylor areas.

Anna Gruenes Conover looks back over 83 eventful years in the Hobart-Sherwood-Taylor areas.

When Anna Gruenes Conover celebrated her birthday on January 30, she could trace her 83 years of memories back through the history of this entire area from Hobart to the beginnings of Sherwood and Taylor, once-lively places which have long disappeared from current maps.

She was born in 1895 in Sherwood, east of Hobart and northwest of what was just becoming the town of Taylor at the time. Her father, Franz Gruenes had arrived in 1886. As a European immigrant en-route from Minnesota to Oregon, he met a couple of men who urged him to stop off in Seattle. One of them was coming out to claim a homestead on which he had filed. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 21, 1980

A minor disaster on the old Pacific Coast Railroad line between Maple Valley and Taylor. A carload of lumber derailed while approaching a trestle between Sherwood and Walsh Lake stations, dumping its load over the bank next to the trestle and pulling at least one more car into the fracas. The derailed cars can be seen wedged between the edge of the trestle and the lumber lying against the bank. Such incidents were rather commonplace events in old-time railroading, and the somewhat rickety Taylor branch of the Pacific Coast RR was no exception. (Photo courtesy Maple Valley Historical Society)

A minor disaster on the old Pacific Coast Railroad line between Maple Valley and Taylor. A carload of lumber derailed while approaching a trestle between Sherwood and Walsh Lake stations, dumping its load over the bank next to the trestle and pulling at least one more car into the fracas. The derailed cars can be seen wedged between the edge of the trestle and the lumber lying against the bank. Such incidents were rather commonplace events in old-time railroading, and the somewhat rickety Taylor branch of the Pacific Coast RR was no exception. (Photo courtesy Maple Valley Historical Society)

(Editor’s note: The days of the ‘‘Iron Horse” are apparently over for Maple Valley as the railroad line here has nearly fallen into disuse. Following is the concluding article in a three-part series, tracing the history of the once well-known Maple Valley depot.)

By Dave Sprau, Burlington Northern train dispatcher
Installment III

One day early in the ‘40s after operations had ceased on the Taylor branch, Ralph Ozura was on duty at the station.

“Conductor Ward Burt on a Milwaukee train called me from Cedar Falls and said he was coming to Maple Valley to take siding for the passenger train,” Ralph recalls.

“I told him his train was too long to fit in our siding and not to come here, but he did anyway and backed his train up the Taylor branch. It indeed was too long for our siding.

“Now, Mr. Burt was a Milwaukee employee and had no business using the Taylor branch as it was intended only for the use of Pacific Coast trains, and therein lies the story here. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 14, 1980

The second Maple Valley depot of the Pacific Coast Railroad. It boasted living quarters upstairs for its employees and their families.

The second Maple Valley depot of the Pacific Coast Railroad. It boasted living quarters upstairs for its employees and their families. (Note curtains in upper windows.) The sign on the express cart reads, “Wells Fargo & Co. Express,” while an enameled sign on the right front or the building advises that this was a “Western Union Telegraph and Cable Office.” A farmer’s milk can sits upon the cart, presumably waiting for the next train to take it to a dairy.

In 1952 after the Great Northern Railway purchased the Pacific Coast, this depot was razed to make way for the present structure in nearly the same location. For our readers who are railroad buffs, the train order signal in front of the building was a two-stage device, the upper arms governing trains from or enroute Cle Elum on Milwaukee tracks, and the lower arm (at about roof level) governing trains enroute Franklin or Black Diamond. (Photo courtesy Jim Bain)

(Editor’s note: The Milwaukee Railroad ran its last train through Maple Valley on March 15 and a significant historical era ended. In the second installment of his series, Dave Sprau, Burlington Northern train dispatcher, recalls the often turbulent past of the Maple Valley depot.)

By Dave Sprau
Installment II

When the Milwaukee stopped running, the dispatchers at Maple Valley had outlived their usefulness.

“There isn’t anything difficult about supervising the movement of one train a day” (a Burlington Northern local), said afternoon dispatcher A.J. McFarland. “When the Milwaukee was running we had many trains to look after and some duties and responsibilities. I hate to say it, but that’s all over now.” (more…)

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