Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Sherwood’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 3, 1903

pacific_coast_ss_co_flyer_croppedAccording to a statement issued by the Pacific Coast Company, the gross earnings of the Pacific Coast Steamship Company for the past year show an increase of $66,934.31 over the preceding year. The various routes operated have all contributed satisfactory increases, with the exception of the Southeastern Alaska and Nome routes, which show a decrease over former seasons owing to competition.

During the year the Port Hartford Wharf, owned by the Pacific Coast Railway Company, the Skagway Wharf, owned by the Alaska Southern Wharf Company, and the Juneau Wharf, owned by the Pacific Coast Company, were this year leased to and operated by the Pacific Coast Steamship Company. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 22, 1978

By Ruby Ziegner

Anna Gruenes Conover looks back over 83 eventful years in the Hobart-Sherwood-Taylor areas.

Anna Gruenes Conover looks back over 83 eventful years in the Hobart-Sherwood-Taylor areas.

When Anna Gruenes Conover celebrated her birthday on January 30, she could trace her 83 years of memories back through the history of this entire area from Hobart to the beginnings of Sherwood and Taylor, once-lively places which have long disappeared from current maps.

She was born in 1895 in Sherwood, east of Hobart and northwest of what was just becoming the town of Taylor at the time. Her father, Franz Gruenes had arrived in 1886. As a European immigrant en-route from Minnesota to Oregon, he met a couple of men who urged him to stop off in Seattle. One of them was coming out to claim a homestead on which he had filed. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 21, 1980

A minor disaster on the old Pacific Coast Railroad line between Maple Valley and Taylor. A carload of lumber derailed while approaching a trestle between Sherwood and Walsh Lake stations, dumping its load over the bank next to the trestle and pulling at least one more car into the fracas. The derailed cars can be seen wedged between the edge of the trestle and the lumber lying against the bank. Such incidents were rather commonplace events in old-time railroading, and the somewhat rickety Taylor branch of the Pacific Coast RR was no exception. (Photo courtesy Maple Valley Historical Society)

A minor disaster on the old Pacific Coast Railroad line between Maple Valley and Taylor. A carload of lumber derailed while approaching a trestle between Sherwood and Walsh Lake stations, dumping its load over the bank next to the trestle and pulling at least one more car into the fracas. The derailed cars can be seen wedged between the edge of the trestle and the lumber lying against the bank. Such incidents were rather commonplace events in old-time railroading, and the somewhat rickety Taylor branch of the Pacific Coast RR was no exception. (Photo courtesy Maple Valley Historical Society)

(Editor’s note: The days of the ‘‘Iron Horse” are apparently over for Maple Valley as the railroad line here has nearly fallen into disuse. Following is the concluding article in a three-part series, tracing the history of the once well-known Maple Valley depot.)

By Dave Sprau, Burlington Northern train dispatcher
Installment III

One day early in the ‘40s after operations had ceased on the Taylor branch, Ralph Ozura was on duty at the station.

“Conductor Ward Burt on a Milwaukee train called me from Cedar Falls and said he was coming to Maple Valley to take siding for the passenger train,” Ralph recalls.

“I told him his train was too long to fit in our siding and not to come here, but he did anyway and backed his train up the Taylor branch. It indeed was too long for our siding.

“Now, Mr. Burt was a Milwaukee employee and had no business using the Taylor branch as it was intended only for the use of Pacific Coast trains, and therein lies the story here. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 14, 1980

The second Maple Valley depot of the Pacific Coast Railroad. It boasted living quarters upstairs for its employees and their families.

The second Maple Valley depot of the Pacific Coast Railroad. It boasted living quarters upstairs for its employees and their families. (Note curtains in upper windows.) The sign on the express cart reads, “Wells Fargo & Co. Express,” while an enameled sign on the right front or the building advises that this was a “Western Union Telegraph and Cable Office.” A farmer’s milk can sits upon the cart, presumably waiting for the next train to take it to a dairy.

In 1952 after the Great Northern Railway purchased the Pacific Coast, this depot was razed to make way for the present structure in nearly the same location. For our readers who are railroad buffs, the train order signal in front of the building was a two-stage device, the upper arms governing trains from or enroute Cle Elum on Milwaukee tracks, and the lower arm (at about roof level) governing trains enroute Franklin or Black Diamond. (Photo courtesy Jim Bain)

(Editor’s note: The Milwaukee Railroad ran its last train through Maple Valley on March 15 and a significant historical era ended. In the second installment of his series, Dave Sprau, Burlington Northern train dispatcher, recalls the often turbulent past of the Maple Valley depot.)

By Dave Sprau
Installment II

When the Milwaukee stopped running, the dispatchers at Maple Valley had outlived their usefulness.

“There isn’t anything difficult about supervising the movement of one train a day” (a Burlington Northern local), said afternoon dispatcher A.J. McFarland. “When the Milwaukee was running we had many trains to look after and some duties and responsibilities. I hate to say it, but that’s all over now.” (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 30, 1980

Maple Valley RR station
Maple Valley’s first railroad station, built in 1887 for the Columbia and Puget Sound Railroad Company. The Milwaukee Road did not come through Maple Valley until 1907. Hence the station was evidently in a considerable different location than the two which replaced it.

At the time this photograph was taken, the track was narrow gauge, probably three feet between the rails, as compared to the standard gauge of 4 feet, 8 ½ inches in use on American railroads today. The Columbia and Puget Sound was purchased by the Pacific Coast Coal Company about 1897 and renamed the Pacific Coast Railroad.

It remained as such until the Burlington Northern merger in 1970, despite the face that in 1952 the Great Northern purchased the railroad and operated it as a separate company. (Photo courtest Maple Valley Historical Society.)

(Editor’s note: The Milwaukee Railroad ran its last train through Maple Valley on March 15 and a significant historical era ended. In this series of articles, beginning below, Dave Sprau, Burlington Northern train dispatcher, recalls the often turbulent past and, to many valleyites, the sad present.)

By Dave Sprau
Installment I

At 4 p.m., Friday, April 4, 1980, Burlington Northern Agent Ralph Ozura locked the door on the Maple Valley station and went home for the last time.

Unlike other days, no “night man“ showed up to relieve Ralph and keep the station operating on its previous 24-hour, seven-day-per-week basis. An era had ended. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, January 2010

By Keith Watson

Bode Locomotive

Black Diamond began as a coal town and needed a way to transport the coal to the market place. The best route was to use the Maple Valley grade with the installation of railroad tracks that would serve Black Diamond and other coal mining areas.

The Black Diamond Coal Company, owner of the town of Black Diamond, was not in the train business. The owner of town of Franklin, 3 miles east of Black Diamond was, and from 1884 to 1885 proceeded to extend the railroad from Seattle, through Renton, through the Maple Valley, into Black Diamond and Franklin. They had to cross the Cedar River four times along the route building bridges as they advanced. They used horse power, up to 300 horses at a time, and many workers.

The first railroad to arrive in Black Diamond was called the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad; previously known as the Seattle & Walla Walla Railroad. The rails were narrow gauge, 36 inches apart, from rail to rail, so the locomotives were small and of course used steam engines.

In those days it was common to name the locomotives along with a number as identification. Some of the names were: No. 1 A.A. Denny; No. 2 AL-Ki; No. 3 Geo. C Bode; No. 4 Georgina; and the numbers 5 thru 10 with no names just numbers. See the narrow gauge locomotive pictures. (more…)

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts