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Posts Tagged ‘Snohomish County’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 1, 1922

Green River mill at Baldi completely destroyed

Pacific States Company loses three outfits, thousands in railway equipment

Forest fire damage to the Pacific States Lumber Company, both at Selleck and Cedar Falls, was increased overnight with the loss last night of Camp No. 18 at Cedar Falls. This makes three logging camps lost by the company, including all the bridges on eleven miles of railway, a coal bunker, twelve donkey engines, fifteen freight cars, a section camp, an enormous amount of fallen timber, and several cars of logs. Two small residences at Selleck also burned last night. Today there was virtually no wind around the company’s territory and it was reported the fire situation was getting under control. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 13, 1924

Quality first, whether it be Holstein dairy cattle or Black Diamond coal, is the policy pursued in Everett by C.O. Hilen, district sales manager for the Pacific Coast Coal Company.

Everett is the metropolis for the rich dairy country of Snohomish County, and in the attractive window display shown above, Mr. Hilen stresses very graphically the importance of quality. Though hardly distinguishable in the above halftone, the scene depicts a diminutive milker seated on a Diamond Briquet by the side of the life-like cow at the left. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 11, 1922

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

George Watkin Evans (1876-1951), 1924 Courtesy Seattle and Environs

George Watkin Evans, 1924

In the last installment, I discussed the coal fields of Whatcom County, the most northerly county in the State of Washington, west of the Cascade Mountains. This time we will group the two counties to the south of Whatcom County, namely, Skagit and Snohomish counties. This is done for the reason that the coal development within these two counties so far has been rather unimportant from a commercial standpoint.

Skagit County: Near the town of Hamilton, on the Great Northern Railroad which traverses the Skagit River valley, is a coal deposit which outcrops on the north and south sides of the Skagit River. About twenty years or more ago, considerable prospecting was done on the south side of Skagit River in a district called Coal Creek and Coal Mountain. No attempt has been made within this area to mine coal on a commercial scale. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 28, 1921

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

George Watkin Evans (1876-1951), 1924 Courtesy Seattle and Environs

George Watkin Evans, 1924

The purpose of this preliminary sketch is to give the readers of the Bulletin a general view of the coal fields of the state, this to be followed by more detailed articles covering each of the counties in which coal occurs in commercial quantities.

Near the northern boundary line of the state, on the northwest slope of Mt. Baker, there is a small area containing anthracite and anthracitic coal. So far no commercial mines have been developed within this field.

Westward and near the shore of Bellingham Bay, is an area containing a coal bed that is being developed by the Bellingham Mines Company. It is not known at present what the full extent of this area is, but it is probable that additional discoveries will be made in Whatcom County. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 22, 1992

By Barbara Nilson

Valley Daily News graphic by Steve Nolan.

Valley Daily News graphic by Steve Nolan.

Boundary lines for a proposed Cedar County were tentatively set last week, according to Dave Fields, spokesman for a group of six dissenters who are “fed up” with King County’s dominance over unincorporated areas.

The proposed county would stretch from the Snohomish County line and from the North Bend area as far west as the border of King County Fire District 43 and the east edge of Lake Youngs.

It would include the towns of Duvall, Carnation, Black Diamond, and Enumclaw. Also included would be the unincorporated areas of eastern King County, including Maple Valley and Covington without Lake Meridian. (more…)

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