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Posts Tagged ‘Snohomish’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 8, 1925

Playing good, consistent ball throughout the entire season, the Black Diamond baseball team ended up with flying colors, the champions of the Pacific Coast Coal League for 1925. Saturday night, October 10, the team will celebrate the close of the season with a banquet at the hotel.

In the picture, left to right, front row—F.C. Bergmann, secretary of the club; Geo. Spencer, Johnny Buck, Pete Gallagher, mascot; Neil Andreson, Mike Naffer, H.J. Babb, manager; back row Geo. Allen, treasurer; Grover Kertis, captain: L. Pierotti, Joe Daley, E. Moon Mullen, S. Paxton, Lou LaFray, Joe Snorski, and Wm. Nicholson, president. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 4, 1925

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today's Gene Coulon Park.

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today’s Gene Coulon Park.

More than million briquets made daily

In 1914 the Briquet Plant was opened and has run continuously since that time. It operates two shifts of eight hours each and produces five hundred tons of briquets a day. That means that more than one and one-half million briquets are made each day.

The briquets are made from a combination of Black Diamond and South Prairie coals. The first of these give it its free burning quality and low ash and the last, a coking coal, gives it its strength and fire holding power. The binder used is a specially prepared form of asphalt from which the stickiness has been removed.

The trip through the plant will be in the direction in which the coal is run, beginning at the point where the raw coal is received and ending at the point where the finished briquet goes into the railroad cars. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 16, 1925

Thousands of Diamond Briquets have been shipped into the Yakima Valley this spring to protect the blossoming fruit trees from damage due to killing frosts. Throughout the orchards of Eastern Washington more than one hundred thousand briquet heaters are now playing their part in the production of bumper crops by radiating the warm glow of red hot briquets against the heretofore invulnerable attacks of Jack Frost.

The scene depicted herewith shows a shipment of Diamond Briquets being unloaded at the yards of Western Fuel Company in Yakima. The trucks are loading fuel to go to the orchards. At the same time, while being so extensively burned in the fruit districts, briquets are continuing to grow in popularity for use in logging operations and for steam shovel use, to say nothing of domestic demand. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 26, 1925

Because of ill health Prof. M.M. Richardson, recently principal of the Newcastle Grade School, has resigned and is now taking a much needed rest. Succeeding him as principal is Mrs. R.R. Sterling, who for several years has taught the primary grades of the school.

Miss Winifred Butler, first at the left, teaches the third and fourth grades. Standing next to her is Mrs. Sterling, then Prof. Richardson and Mrs. Richardson, the latter being in charge of the fifth and sixth grades. The seventh and eighth grades are now being taught by Miss Grantham who will complete the retiring principal’s term. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 25, 1924

Another Christmas is here, the season of all the year when human hearts are warmest. With the passing of another milestone the bonds of friendship and mutual understanding between all members of The Pacific Coast family are still more closely knit by the knowledge of obstacles overcome together and confident prospects of continued success in the days ahead.

To those who are celebrating their fourth Yuletide at the camps; and to the newest men and their families, as well as to all who have been a part of the company for years past; we wish to convey our cordial best wishes for a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

E.C. Ward, President (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 24, 1924

During Christmas week the striking window display pictured above was exhibited by the Porter Transfer & Fuel Co., of Snohomish, Washington, dealers in that city for the Pacific Coast Coal Company.

Mr. J.R. Porter is authority for the statement that the truck is loaded with two tons of Black Diamond lump. Needless to say, he has developed a thriving fuel business in Snohomish. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 16, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

This huge sawmill was the center of the Wood & Iverson operations in Hobart from 1913 to 1941. The mill pond was in the foreground. The site now is an area of swampy ground which will be crossed by a new road.

This huge sawmill was the center of the Wood & Iverson operations in Hobart from 1913 to 1941. The mill pond was in the foreground. The site now is an area of swampy ground which will be crossed by a new road.

Memories are becoming more dear to the pioneers of this area as progress changes the very face of the land.

For instance, where the new Primary State Highway No. 2, Echo Lake Branch, now under construction, will cross a stretch of swampy ground on a viaduct near Hobart, east of Maple Valley, a large mill once made the countryside echo with the sound of saws and the blast of its whistle summoning men to work.

The highway climbs along Holder Creek Canyon through vestiges of a forest that fed its logs to the Wood & Iverson mill from 1913 to 1941. (more…)

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