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Posts Tagged ‘Snoqualmie Pass’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 10, 1983

by Herb Belanger
Times South bureau

In 1964, people were still waiting for the train In Lester. Now Burlington Northern wants to get rid of the old railroad station deep in the Cascade Mountains.

In 1964, people were still waiting for the train in Lester. Now Burlington Northern wants to get rid of the old railroad station deep in the Cascade Mountains.

The Lester depot, the 97-year-old railroad station in the Cascade Mountains, has been sold by the Burlington Northern Railroad to a Woodinville developer, Wayne Farrer Jr., for $1.

The sale was made with the stipulation that the building would be removed from the BN property by Feb. 1. What Farrer intends to do with the building was not indicated and he could not be reached yesterday for comment.

The depot has been a subject of major interest among historically minded people who feel that it should be saved as a memorial of a time when the first railroad line was punched across the Cascade Mountains opening the Puget Sound area to direct communication with the East. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 23, 2016

By Bill Kombol

Maple Valley’s third depot dates to 1953, shortly after it was built.

Maple Valley’s third depot dates to 1953, shortly after it was built.

Over the near century from 1885 to 1982, Maple Valley hosted three different railroad stations, all located in old Maple Valley just north of where Highway 18 overpasses SR-169. This photo of the third Maple Valley depot dates to 1953 shortly after it was built.

The Maple Valley station was an important cog for directing rail traffic as trains could be switched to Black Diamond, Taylor, or up the Cedar River through Landsburg into the watershed. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 14, 1923

If working a shift in Black Diamond Mine was no harder for the four men shown above than it was for them to pose for this picture, there would always be a mad scramble among the men to see who could get the first man-trip down.

At the left we introduce to you, George Belt, and next to him, Fred Cunningham, a former Issaquah miner. The man next in line is R.E. “Curly” Campbell and the young Hercules at the extreme right is Darwin Walton. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 27, 1906

Grading expected to be far enough advanced by that time to permit contractors to construct new tracks

Right-of-way through Cedar River Valley will be improved as soon as the franchise ordinance permits

Line reaching for Tacoma beyond Black River Junction will parallel the Puget Sound Electric Company

Actual track laying will commence on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul’s line in this state by fall. Grading on the extension up Cedar River Valley from the point near Maple Valley where the St. Paul leaves the tracks of the Columbia & Puget Sound, will begin as soon as the company is notified of the approval of its franchise ordinance.

The camps will be established within a few days. The mills of the state are so busy with orders for rail and cargo shipment that they will be unable to handle the big contract the St. Paul will have to let. As a result a number of portable mills will be sent into the woods along the right of way of the St. Paul and ties will be gotten out at convenient points. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 8, 1906

Formal application for right to run up Cedar River valley to be presented to the city council tomorrow

The contract between the Pacific Coast Company and the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul which provides for the joint use of the tracks of the Columbia & Puget Sound between Seattle and Maple Valley is said to have been formally approved by the board of directors of the Pacific Coast Company.

J.C. Ford will sign the compact on behalf of his company as soon as he returns from California. The deal will be affirmed on behalf of the St. Paul road by H.R. Williams, president of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad of Washington. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 24, 1953

Crash sites: Cross at left designates where the wreckage of a C-46 transport plane was sighted today, less than a mile from the site of the April 14 crash (right cross) of a DC-3 in which six died and 19 survived. The area is near Cedar Lake in South Central King County. Four crew members were aboard the C-46. Two survivors were rescued.

Crash sites: Cross at left designates where the wreckage of a C-46 transport plane was sighted today, less than a mile from the site of the April 14 crash (right cross) of a DC-3 in which six died and 19 survived. The area is near Cedar Lake in South Central King County. Four crew members were aboard the C-46. Two survivors were rescued.

Searchers today found the wreckage and two survivors of a C-46 transport that crashed early yesterday on a 4,200-foot ridge, less than a mile from where a DC-3 struck the Cascades foothills April 14. Two other men aboard the C-46 were dead.

The wreckage of the twin-engined, 40-passenger plane lay in timber on the snowy slopes of the ridge, a mile southwest of Cedar Lake in the Cedar River watershed of South Central King County. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 23, 1953

Troop ferry last heard over Easton

A Seattle-bound nonscheduled C-46 airliner vanished over the Stampede Pass area of the Cascades early today. The plane carried four men.

The two-engine American Air Transport, Inc., plane sent its last message over Easton, on the east slope of the Cascades, at 12:47 o’clock. The pilot reported everything was normal. The plane was due at Boeing Field at 1:05. (more…)

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