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Posts Tagged ‘Snoqualmie River’

Originally published in the Kent News Journal, January 4, 1985

By Pat Jenkins
Staff Reporter

Move over, coal. Hydroelectricity wants to be the new industry on the block in Black Diamond.

It might never happen, but a proposal by private investors to build a hydroelectric generating plant near the Green River and put Black Diamond in the electricity business has the attention of officials in a city that’s famous for its coal-mining history. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Star, April 14, 1908

One is found with bullet hole through his leg

Both confess participation in the shooting that led to the death of Kent marshal—Star staff correspondent with the posse when the men were captured—Prisoners give description of fourth man, who escaped

By G. Stuart Costello
Special Staff Correspondent

G. Stuart Costello, a member of The Star’s local staff, was the only newspaper correspondent actually with Deputy Sheriff Starwich’s posse during the hard tramp over the mountains on the trail of the murderer of Marshal Frank Miller. Other correspondents were some distance in the rear. This information does not come to The Star from Mr. Costello, who is a modest young gentleman, but comes from Deputy Sheriffs Joe Hill and Chet Belding, who reached Seattle this morning.

MARTIN, Wash., April 14—After a dramatic chase extending over 20 miles, over the crest of the Cascade mountains through Snoqualmie Pass, the posse headed by Deputy Sheriffs Matt Starwich and John Liner yesterday captured Yoven S. Borsvich, aged 23, and Nick Pettrich, aged 28, the remaining members of the gang, which on last Thursday night, shot and fatally wounded Marshal Frank Miller at Kent, and later wounded Deputy Sheriff Jack Storey in the Snoqualmie Valley.

Pettrich has a bullet hole through the lower part of his left leg and will either lose his leg or his life from blood poisoning. The man spent two days and nights barefooted in the snow of the mountains, and the wound is suppurating badly.

The wound was received in the battle with Deputies Starwich and Storey Saturday. One of Starwich’s bullets also passed through the lapel and back of the man’s coat. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, September 20, 1908

Track-laying rushed in five different places on Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul in Pacific Northwest

New towns spring up along route

Rich agricultural and fruit districts heretofore remote from traffic opened up to development

1—Columbia River bridge, under construction. 2—Steamboat St. Paul, used in construction of Columbia River bridge. 3—Completed piers of Columbia River bridge. 4—Water wheel furnishing power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley. 5—Scene in the timber, Snoqualmie Valley. 6—Flume carrying water to wheel to furnish power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley.

1—Columbia River bridge, under construction. 2—Steamboat St. Paul, used in construction of Columbia River bridge. 3—Completed piers of Columbia River bridge. 4—Water wheel furnishing power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley. 5—Scene in the timber, Snoqualmie Valley. 6—Flume carrying water to wheel to furnish power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley.

Records for fast work in the construction of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway in the Pacific Northwestern states, when the line is finished next year, may, and doubtless will, be found to establish a new mark in the “winning of the West,” to use the phrase employed as the title of one of his most interesting works, by the President of the United States.

A summary of present day conditions on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul may be gained from the following. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 18, 1979

By Teresa Hensley

Circled above is the low area in the right abutment of the masonry dam.

Circled above is the low area in the right abutment of the masonry dam.

“There is no imminent danger, and people should not be alarmed,” said Colonel John A. Poteat, the Army Corps Seattle District Engineer, in a press release last week from Seattle City Light about the masonry dam above the Cedar River.

In an earlier press conference it was revealed that the dam could prove unsafe in the event of a major flood.

Conditions which could trigger such an emergency—described as “a flood on top of a flood” by Joe Recchi, acting superintendent of City Light—have never been approached in the 75 years of the project. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 13, 1977

Last year’s Valley Days winner—as well as winners in two other 1976 races sponsored by the Cedar River Boat Association—were Bill Furlong, left, throwing a “victory splash’ at his partner, Bill Niord, after the finish of the men’s contest on Maple Valley Days. They’ll be trying for the big trophy again this year on June 4.

Last year’s Valley Days winner—as well as winners in two other 1976 races sponsored by the Cedar River Boat Association—were Bill Furlong, left, throwing a “victory splash’ at his partner, Bill Niord, after the finish of the men’s contest on Maple Valley Days. They’ll be trying for the big trophy again this year on June 4.

The boats are again taking to the Cedar in practice spins for the men’s and women’s Cedar River Boat Race to be held this year on June 4 as part of the annual Maple Valley Days celebration.

One craft, of course, will be manned by Bill Furlong and Bill Niord, who have come quite a way together in the last two years. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Daily Times, December 23, 1918

Lumbering community desolated

Cottages of working men carried away by rush of pent up water at North Bend – Stream rises with amazing rapidity when old timbered structure gives way

“The arrow on the map shows where the big eruption took place at midnight, December 23, 1918, hurling a million and a half yards of rocks, earth, and gravel for miles around, opening up a creek, now called ‘Christmas Creek,’ which flowed on to Boxley Creek, causing it to rise and to add flood damage to the inhabitants of Edgewick. The town was completely destroyed. The map gives a graphic picture of the entire district showing where Edgewick was formerly located and Rattlesnake Lake in which the town of Cedar Falls was formerly thriving. It shows the location of the new masonry dam and the old temporary or crib dam, Mount Washington, the north bank, and the rock ribbed mountain on the south of west, all of which were intended for the walls of the great natural reservoir, provided the north bank had not been porous.” – The Seattle Daily Times, July 26, 1921

“The arrow on the map shows where the big eruption took place at midnight, December 23, 1918, hurling a million and a half yards of rocks, earth, and gravel for miles around, opening up a creek, now called ‘Christmas Creek,’ which flowed on to Boxley Creek, causing it to rise and to add flood damage to the inhabitants of Edgewick. The town was completely destroyed. The map gives a graphic picture of the entire district showing where Edgewick was formerly located and Rattlesnake Lake in which the town of Cedar Falls was formerly thriving. It shows the location of the new masonry dam and the old temporary or crib dam, Mount Washington, the north bank, and the rock ribbed mountain on the south of west, all of which were intended for the walls of the great natural reservoir, provided the north bank had not been porous.” – The Seattle Daily Times, July 26, 1921

Houses were toppled over, a shingle mill swept away, a lumber mill flooded and a section of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad’s main line washed out this morning when the McCann Shingle Company’s dam near Edgewick gave way as the result of pressure of water caused by leakage from the city’s Cedar River dam. (more…)

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