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Posts Tagged ‘Snoqualmie’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 4, 1926

Editors and publishers of approximately 100 newspapers in the State of Washington were the guests of the Pacific Coast Coal Company at Newcastle and the Briquet Plant, last Saturday. This excursion was the closing feature of the Fourteenth Annual Newspaper Institute of the Washington Press Association.

The picture shows the group ready to board the special train after having made a trip into the Primrose Seam, a mile and a quarter into the heart of the mountain, from whence comes the famous Newcastle coal. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, January 16, 1900

King County road supervisors held a well-attended and spirited convention in the library room at the court house yesterday afternoon. A permanent organization to be known as the Road Supervisors’ Association of King County was formed, and numerous speeches dealing with road matters were made. The principal suggestions referred to what is known as the trunk system of roads and broad wagon tires.

Superintendent of Streets Little, of the Seattle city government, called the convention to order, and gave way to temporary chairman W.J. Trimble, of Redmond. After W.E. Conway, A.J. Bossert, and C.H. Daniels, committee on rules and business, and James Clark, George Hummell, and David Gibbon, committee on permanent organization, had reported, the election of officers took place. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, October 31, 1884

Editor, Post-Intelligencer:

Your correspondent was yesterday placed under great obligations to Mr. J.L. Howard, general superintendent of the Oregon Improvement Company, by reason of an invitation, obtained through the kindness of Mayor Leary, to accompany himself, Mr. Leary and Mr. A.A. Denny over the new line of railroad stretching from our city toward the Green River coal fields, and known in common parlance as the Cedar River Extension. Mr. Denny was, to the regret of all, unable to attend.

The party was under the thoughtful care of Mr. T.J. Milner, the genial assistant superintendent of the Columbia and Puget Sound Railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 1, 1925

Judges at the Southeastern Alaska Fair, held at Juneau, September 15 to 19, decided that the booth of the Pacific Coast Coal Company was entitled to first prize among the strictly merchant displays, and second prize out of all the exhibits at the fair. While the picture cannot reproduce the full attractiveness of the booth, it nevertheless shows that H.G. Walmsley, the Juneau manager for the Pacific Coast Coal Company, is an artist in combining an effective display of black and white. (more…)

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Originally published in Northwest Nikkei, May 1994

By Ed Suguro

A 1924 photo of the Selleck Japanese community. T.Z.Maekawa is the man in the striped tie with hand in pocket, third row from top; Heiji Sakakibara is the man standing next to him. The Rev. U.G. Murphy is sitting far right third row from bottom. Mr. Abo, the foreman, is sitting in the middle with the baby.

Before World War II there were a number of company sawmill towns like Mukilteo, Snoqualmie, Selleck, Eatonville, National, Onalaska, Walvill, and Longview in which the Issei worked and the Nisei grew up.

Selleck was about 10 miles east of Maple Valley and was recognized by the King County Landmarks Commission as a historical landmark and by the National Register as a historic district. It was a company town in which the Pacific States Lumber Company, one of the largest on the West Coast, employed a number of Issei.

Among those who lived there were T.Z. Maekawa, who worked at the mill, and the Rev. Joseph Sakakibara, who grew up there until high school. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 26, 1979

Roy Freeman, architect of the proposed new county (shown above) still insists that, indeed, its time is here. Speaking at last week’s meeting of the Maple Valley Chamber of Commerce, Freeman says he has traveled 40,000 miles promoting the plan since 1972. The Create Cascade County group still has some left-over bumper stickers and $63 in the bank.

Cascade County, once formed, could make a go of it, Freeman said. The tax base in the proposed area has increased from $295 million in the early 1970s to more than $500 million. In 1974 he estimated $2.5 million was needed to run the new county, with tax revenue totaling $3.1 million.

“At present,” he argued, “we’re being run from Seattle.”

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 8, 1934

Woodsmen and deputy sheriffs join in search; 5 aboard Spokane-Seattle craft escape uninjured

Miss Helen Curren, Seattle insurance firm cashier, upper left, suffered a leg injury when a United Air Lines planes, in which she was returning from a Wenatchee wedding, crashed in the fog east of Selleck yesterday. Upper right—Miss Marian Bennett, Spokane, plane stewardess, gave first aid to Miss Curran, Pilot Ben Redfield and Robert C. Clarke, Wenatchee passenger, also hurt. Lower—Copilot Dwight Hansen, photographed in Virginia Mason Hospital.—(Miss Curran’s photo by Hartsook.)

Miss Helen Curren, Seattle insurance firm cashier, upper left, suffered a leg injury when a United Air Lines planes, in which she was returning from a Wenatchee wedding, crashed in the fog east of Selleck yesterday. Upper right—Miss Marian Bennett, Spokane, plane stewardess, gave first aid to Miss Curran, Pilot Ben Redfield and Robert C. Clarke, Wenatchee passenger, also hurt. Lower—Copilot Dwight Hansen, photographed in Virginia Mason Hospital.—(Miss Curran’s photo by Hartsook.)

Woodsmen, forest rangers, watershed patrolmen, and Seattle deputy sheriffs today searched through the rain-soaked undergrowth of the Snoqualmie National Forest, thirty miles southeast of Seattle, for Daisy A. Mooney of Winthrop, missing after a United Air Lines plane in which she was a passenger crashed six miles east of Selleck last evening.

She disappeared last evening after a United Air Lines planes, carrying her and five other passengers and a crew of three, crashed in the fog and rain on a mountainside of the high Cascades.

Four persons were injured in the smash, which might have been fatal had it not been for the quick thinking of the pilots and the sturdy construction of the Spokane-to-Seattle plane.

Co-pilot staggers out of wilds

First word of the mishap reached Seattle about 8 o’clock last night when Copilot Dwight Hansen of Spokane, badly injured, staggered out of the wilderness and obtained a rescue party at Selleck. Hansen was taken to Virginia Mason Hospital in Seattle.

In addition to Hansen, who is suffering from a probable broken nose, shock, a deep wound in one leg, and many minor cuts and bruises, the injured include:

Pilot Ben Redfield, Spokane, compound fracture of the left arm.

Robert Clarke, Tacoma state liquor inspector, wrenched back.

Miss Helen Curren, cashier for the Great West Life Assurance Company in Seattle, leg injured but believed unbroken. (more…)

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