Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘South Prairie’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 19, 1906

Pacific Coast Co. and Northern Pacific may come under provisions which prohibit carriers operating plants

Shipments outside Washington forbidden by the operators, but Hill line will me most seriously hurt by rule; Piles made fight to help local industries and Portland coal market to suffer if supply must be cut off

If the House agrees to the amendment made by the United States senate, forbidding common carriers from hauling coal mined in their own properties to points outside the state, the Pacific Coast Company and Northern Pacific will be seriously affected.

It was to save the coal properties of these two lines that United States Senator S.H. Piles is understood to have introduced his amendment exempting lines whose principal business is not that of a common carrier.

Just how this would have helped the Northern Pacific is not clear, but it would have been of some advantage to the Pacific Coast Company. That it was lost is believed by railroad men to have been due to the necessity for regulating the anthracite roads. The Pacific Coast Company can probably escape the provisions of the bill, but it will be a more expensive task to market the coal of that corporation. The Northern Pacific is expected to be compelled to limit its market to this state. (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 17, 2011

By Barbara Nilson

Front of the Carbonado Saloon built in 1889 and now offering a special Senior Menu on Thursdays.

Every Thursday is Senior Citizen Day at the Carbonado Tavern built in 1889.

The saloon is an inviting place with a favorite niche to the right of the door with a gas stove, round table carved with years of names of thirsty patrons, and the walls covered with reminders of when Carbonado was a mining and logging community starting in 1870. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 7, 1925

Before sailing for the four thousand mile trip to Japan, where they will act as a convoy to Lieut. Col. Pedro L. Zanni, intrepid Argentine army aviator, the two 100-foot North Sea trawlers shown in the halftone above, called at the bunkers of the Pacific Coast Coal Company in Seattle to load fuel for the hazardous voyage.

The two staunch little vessels are the Canada and the Imbricaria, both of which have been chartered by the Argentine government to patrol the route across the Pacific recently followed by the globe-girdling American army flyers. This will be the course which Col. Zanni will take, winging his way eastward from Japan. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 30, 1925

Josephine Corliss Preston

Josephine Corliss Preston

Following a three-day convention of the County School Superintendents of the state at Olympia, at which were present a number of prominent national and state educational leaders, the delegates have been invited to visit Carbonado Mine as the guests of the Pacific Coast Coal Company.

Mrs. Josephine Corliss Preston, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, and Mrs. Clare Ketchum Tripp, Director of the Washington Industries Educational Bureau, have arranged for those attending the convention to visit a number of industrial plants in Tacoma on Thursday morning, April 30.

Immediately following lunch, the party will be conducted by auto to Carbonado, via South Prairie and Wilkeson. Details of the program will be found on the last page of the Bulletin. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 23, 1925

Years ago, the railroad depot was the most popular place in every small city or town, and the daily arrival of the limited was an event seldom missed by the population. Automobiles and motor stages have changed all this, however, and today the highway is more popular than the railway. Nevertheless, the Pacific Coast depot at Black Diamond is still an important place in the camp, and the daily dispatching of long train loads of coal is a sight most pleasing to everyone. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 26, 1925

Walter Burnum, recently elected president of The Pacific Coast Co.

Walter Burnum, recently elected president of The Pacific Coast Co.

As is generally known among the employees, the Pacific Coast Coal Company is owned and operated by The Pacific Coast Company, of which Mr. Wm. M. Barnum of New York has for many years been president, and Mr. Walter Barnum, treasurer. Mr. E.C. Ward is president of the former and vice-president of the latter. Mr. Walter Barnum has now been elected to the presidency of The Pacific Coast Company, and Mr. Wm. M. Barnum continues as a director of the company and in close association with its affairs.

Both of these Eastern officials have been in Seattle for the past week on their semi-annual visit of inspection, and they will probably remain here until the end of the month. They, with Mr. Ward and other local officials, are visiting each of the mine operations.

The new president is intimately familiar with all of the company’s activities, and enjoys a wide acquaintance among the employees, having been a regular visitor at the mines for many years past. On this, as well as former trips, he has extended his personal inspection into the underground workings of the mines, in the activities of which he takes a keen interest.

He is also closely identified with the larger coal problems of the nation, being vice-president of the National Coal Association which embraces in its membership most of the principal operators of the United States. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 19, 1925

Here is shown a shipment of asphalt on the pier ready for loading into Pacific Coast box cars for shipment to the Briquet Plant. Asphalt is used in the manufacture of Diamond Briquets to bind the finely pulverized South Prairie and Black Diamond coal together. It is shipped from California by water in barrels.

When ready for melting at the Briquet Plant the barrels are broken up and the staves burned, as there is no method by which the hardened asphalt can be removed without destroying the container. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »