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Posts Tagged ‘Spiketon’

Originally published in Carbon River Heritage newsletter, July 1986

by Nancy Irene Hall

James L. Brummett, ex-Coast Guard officer-turned trapper, fisherman, and hunter. Jim posing with some of his furs on the dock of his Double Rainbow Lake Resort located just 2 miles east of Wilkeson on the Quinnon exit. (Photo by Nancy Irene Hall.)

James L. Brummett, ex-Coast Guard officer-turned trapper, fisherman, and hunter. Jim posing with some of his furs on the dock of his Double Rainbow Lake Resort located just 2 miles east of Wilkeson on the Quinnon exit. (Photo by Nancy Irene Hall.)

The site of the old coal mine town once called South Willis lies just a few miles east of Wilkeson on the Quinnion exit. It is now the home of Double Rainbow Resort, a 25-acre resort run by James L. Brummett. This land has seen many changes since its coal mining days.

It was named after the Northern Pacific Railroad’s young geologist Bailey Willis, who did the coal explorations for their Northern Transcontinental Survey in 1881–1884. After his explorations he gave his account of the coal in the Wilkeson, South Willis, Carbonado area in a paper entitled “Report of the Coal Fields of Washington Territory.” (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 7, 1914

More than 15 trained corps of emergency mines men to take part in big field meet on varsity campus

Contest approved by Bureau of Mines: Director J.J. Corey, head of University Station, makes plans for first competition of kind in Washington

Self Contained Breathing Apparatus, 1917

Self Contained Breathing Apparatus, 1917

More than fifteen drilled first aid and mines rescue teams, representing nearly every coal mining company in the state, and including a team from the Northern Pacific Railroad at Cle Elum, will participate in the first contest of its kind ever held in Washington, July 22 and 23, on the cadet drill grounds on the University of Washington campus. Preparations have been going on for several weeks and final arrangements for the meet are nearly completed.

Approved by the United States Bureau of Mines and under the personal supervision of J.J. Corey, director of the Mine Rescue Station on the university campus, the meet as planned will become an annual affair. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 2, 1913

Lawless malcontents fire into company hotel and attempt to tear down stockade at open camp

Corporation employee gets bullet in foot

Bayne hotel

Bayne hotel

One non-union employee was shot, a rifle bullet shattering his foot, and an attempt was made to tear down the stockade gate and fence at the open-shop Bayne mine of the Carbon Coal & Clay Company, forty miles southeast of Seattle, last night.

It was the climax to a day of demonstration during which more than 1,000 members of the United Mine Workers of America had assembled outside the stockade to register a protest against the non-union status of the employees on the other side of the fence. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 20, 1922

This photo shows a long row of identically-built houses in the eastern Pierce County coal mining town of Burnett, circa 1920. In the early days, coal mining companies had to attract a labor force to remote areas where housing was scarce. The solution was to build rows of identical houses to reduce construction costs. Mining in the Burnett area, near Wilkeson, began in 1881 with a water level drift mine operated by the South Prairie Coal Company. In 1906 control of the Burnett mines passed to Pacific Coast Coal Co. For a number of years, Burnett was the top-producing coal mine in Pierce County. Other notable Pierce County coal mining towns include Wilkeson, Carbonado, Melmont, Fairfax, Montesuma, Ashford, and Pittsburg which was later known as Spiketon or Morristown. This photo comes from the Pacific Coast Company collection of photos. (Enumclaw Courier-Herald, August 17, 2011)

This photo shows a long row of identically-built houses in the eastern Pierce County coal mining town of Burnett, circa 1920. In the early days, coal mining companies had to attract a labor force to remote areas where housing was scarce. The solution was to build rows of identical houses to reduce construction costs. Mining in the Burnett area, near Wilkeson, began in 1881 with a water level drift mine operated by the South Prairie Coal Company. In 1906 control of the Burnett mines passed to Pacific Coast Coal Co. For a number of years, Burnett was the top-producing coal mine in Pierce County. Other notable Pierce County coal mining towns include Wilkeson, Carbonado, Melmont, Fairfax, Montesuma, Ashford, and Pittsburg which was later known as Spiketon or Morristown. This photo comes from the Pacific Coast Company collection of photos. (Enumclaw Courier-Herald, August 17, 2011)

“The trouble with many men is that they are too diffident,” began Industrial Engineer Lindsey, the day Ye Editor drifted into his office on the seventh floor of the Smith Building, Seattle. (more…)

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