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Posts Tagged ‘Squak Mountain’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, April 9, 1980

By Louis T. Corsaletti
Times suburban reporter

The dotted line shows the area to be covered by the communities plan.

The dotted line shows the area to be covered by the communities plan.

TAHOMA-RAVEN HEIGHTS — More than 115 years ago the discovery of vast coal deposits drew settlers to the remote Squak Mountain, Issaquah and Newcastle regions. But now the sprawling reserves of undeveloped land are spawning rapid growth in the 150-square mile area from Issaquah south to Black Diamond.

So last August, King County planners assisting a citizens’ committee began the tremendous task of planning for the future of what is called the Tahoma/Raven Heights Communities Plan area—the largest plan undertaken so far.

A recently prepared profile on Tahoma/Raven Heights shows that between 1970 and 1980, the population has grown from about 19,500 to about 26,000. And forecasts indicate a population of almost 40,000 by 1990. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 13, 1988

By Louis T. Corsaletti
Seattle Times Eastside bureau

One of the Newcastle coal-mine rescue teams in 1924 included, from left, B.F. Snook (the captain), George Hasku, Walter Clark, Joe Ansberger and George Munson.

One of the Newcastle coal-mine rescue teams in 1924 included, from left, B.F. Snook (the captain), George Hasku, Walter Clark, Joe Ansberger and George Munson.

It was an economic boom that lasted for more than 50 years—one that helped put Seattle and the Eastside on the map.

And it was a force that almost overnight turned this part of the Pacific Northwest into an ethnic melting pot.

Described in newspapers of the day, it was called “coal rush” and “coal fever.”

Coal. Black diamonds. Black gold. (more…)

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Originally published in the News Mill, Volume 1, No. 3, March 31, 1976

Issaquah Coal Mine TramCan you remember … when Mountain Park was a heavily-forested hillside and the sounds of the coal cars could be heard across the valley as they rumbled to the surface with another load of “black gold”? (more…)

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Originally published in Eastsideweek, November 24, 1993

By David B. Buerge

Black lung, long hours, and stinking low pay: While the coal-mining business boomed on the Eastside, the underground life was a bust

Coal Creek Mine

On a mid-August night in 1929, residents of Coal Creek, west of Issaquah, watched a red glow fill the northern sky. As the ruddy light shifted and flared, miners about to go down for the graveyard shift deep in the Primrose Mine wondered aloud if Kirkland might be on fire.

But the lift bringing them back out of the mine at 7:30 that morning was more than a mile away from the entrance they’d used the night before. It was then they realized that the fire was much closer than Kirkland. They had their first look at the smoking timbers of the Pacific Coast Coal Co.’s coal bunkers and washery, which had tumbled in a charred ruin on the railroad tracks to Seattle.

Their hearts sank. (more…)

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