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Posts Tagged ‘Strain Coal Company’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 28, 2014

By Bill Kombol

Mine No. 7 opened in 1893 and produced coal until 1907. It was later reopened during World War II, closing for good in 1946.

Mine No. 7 opened in 1893 and produced coal until 1907. It was later reopened during World War II, closing for good in 1946.

This impressive photo shows Franklin mine No. 7 on February 19, 1902. The mine was located on the north slope of Franklin Hill, about one mile from the main town of Franklin.

It was served by the Bruce Branch of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, which paralleled the Green River Gorge Road and ended just south of Lake Twelve.

The mine opened in 1893. It was sunk 3,185 feet along a slope with a 30° pitch, with coal extracted from eight underground levels. It reached a depth of 1,046 feet, or about 150 feet below sea level.

The mine produced coal until 1907 when it was shut down and the rails taken up. During the early years of World War II, the mine was re-opened by Pacific Coast Coal Co. and later operated by the Strain Coal Co. The mine was permanently closed by Pacific Coast Coal on August 1, 1946.

This Curtis and Romans photo, number 1050, comes courtesy of the Washington State Historical Society in Tacoma.

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 13, 1988

By Louis T. Corsaletti
Seattle Times Eastside bureau

One of the Newcastle coal-mine rescue teams in 1924 included, from left, B.F. Snook (the captain), George Hasku, Walter Clark, Joe Ansberger and George Munson.

One of the Newcastle coal-mine rescue teams in 1924 included, from left, B.F. Snook (the captain), George Hasku, Walter Clark, Joe Ansberger and George Munson.

It was an economic boom that lasted for more than 50 years—one that helped put Seattle and the Eastside on the map.

And it was a force that almost overnight turned this part of the Pacific Northwest into an ethnic melting pot.

Described in newspapers of the day, it was called “coal rush” and “coal fever.”

Coal. Black diamonds. Black gold. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 19, 2008

By Bill Kombol

Coal miner Ted Rouse stands outside the New Black Diamond (aka Indian) mine in the 1920s.

Coal miner Ted Rouse stands outside the New Black Diamond (aka Indian) mine in the 1920s.

In this photo, taken in the late 1920s, coal miner Ted Rouse stands outside the New Black Diamond (aka Indian) mine, which was located between Renton and Maple Valley on State Route 169. He wears a head lamp to light his work in the darkness of the mine.

Theodore Elmon Rouse was born December 23, 1893, in Newcastle, Washington, and died on May 29, 1959, at Renton, Washington.

Mr. Rouse worked in the coal mines in the state of Washington for over fifty years beginning his career in Newcastle. He also worked in the Black Diamond mines for Pacific Coast Coal Company and Strain Coal Company. (more…)

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Originally published in the Eastside Journal, January 5, 2000

Milt Swanson (third from left) talks with officials about the sinkhole that opened at the Red Town Trailhead in Newcastle. Swanson, an 81-year-old former Newcastle mine worker, is consulted often. From left are Glenn Waugh of the Office of Surface Management, Department of Interior; Steve Williams with King County Parks; Swanson; and Jeff Wagner, an engineer with the firm of Hart-Crowser and a consultant to the Office of Surface Management. (Rick Schweinhart/Journal)

Milt Swanson (third from left) talks with officials about the sinkhole that opened at the Red Town Trailhead in Newcastle. Swanson, an 81-year-old former Newcastle mine worker, is consulted often. From left are Glenn Waugh of the Office of Surface Management, Department of Interior; Steve Williams with King County Parks; Swanson; and Jeff Wagner, an engineer with the firm of Hart-Crowser and a consultant to the Office of Surface Management. (Rick Schweinhart/Journal)

Hole probably indicates collapse of old mine

By Jim Larson

An informal summit between federal and county officials was held yesterday afternoon at the edge of a massive sinkhole in Cougar Mountain Park.

Glenn Waugh, from the Department of the Interior, and Craig Larsen, director of the King County Park System, met at the Red Town Trailhead with other officials to evaluate the sinkhole.

“Being this close to a hiking trail, (the sinkhole) is a major concern,” Waugh said.

It’s believed the opening in the earth, roughly 50 feet long and 35 feet wide, was caused by the collapse of an underlying coal mine.

“That’s our assumption, but we don’t know yet,” Larsen said, noting that it might take some time for federal specialists to determine the cause—and recommend solutions. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, January 2008

By Frank Hammock

Jones Lake Cinder Removal Project, June 1990 (Courtesy of Bill Kombol, Palmer Coking Co.)

Jones Lake Cinder Removal Project, June 1990 (Courtesy of Bill Kombol, Palmer Coking Co.)

Stories have a way of shaping, through knowledge and experience, the journeys of our past from the people who share them. We all have stories to tell, in one form or another, and from these stories we gain a better understanding of who we are, and where we are going. Thus, the process we call life, a time of transition and change, is slowly revealed in all its intricacies and detail. This story is no exception.

Let’s step back in time and see a little of Black Diamond’s history through the eyes of a man who was willing to share his knowledge and the memories of his life, from the era in which he lived.

Mr. Arthur “Archie” Walter Eltz was born on September 30, 1915, at 8 a.m. in Butlerville, Salt Lake County, Utah. His parents, Frank Eltz and Annie Zadnick, both hailed from Germany. (more…)

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