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Posts Tagged ‘Summit’

Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, June 2015

The mystery photo in the last Bugle was Belleman’s station.

The mystery photo in the last Bugle was Belleman’s station.

Gary Habenict nailed it and then added some info we didn’t know.

The picture in the last issue of the Bugle, Belleman’s gas station and café at Four Corners—or back then, Five Corners—1946-1948, maybe.

Mine office across the street. Looking north on Maple Valley Highway, the toll lead, with eight cross arms of copper wire, went from Seattle through Stampede Pass to Yakima. A red flashing stoplight for east-west traffic and a flashing yellow for the main highway, now SR-169.

Belleman sold to Ray Spurgeon who operated the station and café for several years. Now it’s a Shop Fast store with lights and turn lanes everywhere. In 1946 you could come to the corner, stop … maybe, and not encounter another car, depending what time it was.

The snow was very typical for winters back then.

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, February 26, 1893

The Hanson-Turnbull wedding: A “hard times” entertainment

The likely location of the ball was the Masonic Lodge (left of center, ca. 1915). The photographer was looking up Baker St. toward Third Ave. (The Congregational Church is to the right; St. Barbara’s in the background.) Today’s Masonic Hall resides in the same location.

The Masonic Hall, left of center, ca. 1915. The photographer was looking up Baker St. toward Third Ave. (The Congregational Church is to the right; St. Barbara’s in the background.) Today’s Masonic Hall resides in the same location.

Mr. Alexander G. Hanson and Miss Jeanie J. Turnbull were married in the Masonic hall at Black Diamond on Tuesday evening by Rev. H.T. Shepard. (more…)

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Summit Inn MenuDecades ago, this area [Four Corners] was named Summit, Washington, by the railroad pioneers when they came into this country. It doesn’t seem like much of a summit in the true meaning of the word, i.e., Webster’s definition: the apex, the top of the highest point. It truly is a summit above Maple Valley and we certainly are higher than the western terminus of the railroad at Seattle.

A branch line from the railroad at Summit went to Landsburg for coal. The railroad right-of-way and track ran alongside our Inn, where you can see the abandoned blacktop road to the south of us. The present Summit-Landsburg Road derived its name from the terminals of that branch line, Summit and Landsburg.

The railroad continued on from Summit to the coal fields of Black Diamond, with a branch lines to Kummer and Franklin.

Summit Inn Map

Our remodeled restaurant building was once a coal mine office many years ago. Coal was truly “King” and our coal traveling down those pioneer railroad tracks became the famous “Seattle Coal” coveted the seas over by all the world’s steamships plying the ocean waters.

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, January 2010

By Keith Watson

Bode Locomotive

Black Diamond began as a coal town and needed a way to transport the coal to the market place. The best route was to use the Maple Valley grade with the installation of railroad tracks that would serve Black Diamond and other coal mining areas.

The Black Diamond Coal Company, owner of the town of Black Diamond, was not in the train business. The owner of town of Franklin, 3 miles east of Black Diamond was, and from 1884 to 1885 proceeded to extend the railroad from Seattle, through Renton, through the Maple Valley, into Black Diamond and Franklin. They had to cross the Cedar River four times along the route building bridges as they advanced. They used horse power, up to 300 horses at a time, and many workers.

The first railroad to arrive in Black Diamond was called the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad; previously known as the Seattle & Walla Walla Railroad. The rails were narrow gauge, 36 inches apart, from rail to rail, so the locomotives were small and of course used steam engines.

In those days it was common to name the locomotives along with a number as identification. Some of the names were: No. 1 A.A. Denny; No. 2 AL-Ki; No. 3 Geo. C Bode; No. 4 Georgina; and the numbers 5 thru 10 with no names just numbers. See the narrow gauge locomotive pictures. (more…)

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