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Posts Tagged ‘Sumner’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 17, 2011

By Barbara Nilson

Front of the Carbonado Saloon built in 1889 and now offering a special Senior Menu on Thursdays.

Every Thursday is Senior Citizen Day at the Carbonado Tavern built in 1889.

The saloon is an inviting place with a favorite niche to the right of the door with a gas stove, round table carved with years of names of thirsty patrons, and the walls covered with reminders of when Carbonado was a mining and logging community starting in 1870. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, September 20, 1908

Track-laying rushed in five different places on Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul in Pacific Northwest

New towns spring up along route

Rich agricultural and fruit districts heretofore remote from traffic opened up to development

1—Columbia River bridge, under construction. 2—Steamboat St. Paul, used in construction of Columbia River bridge. 3—Completed piers of Columbia River bridge. 4—Water wheel furnishing power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley. 5—Scene in the timber, Snoqualmie Valley. 6—Flume carrying water to wheel to furnish power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley.

1—Columbia River bridge, under construction. 2—Steamboat St. Paul, used in construction of Columbia River bridge. 3—Completed piers of Columbia River bridge. 4—Water wheel furnishing power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley. 5—Scene in the timber, Snoqualmie Valley. 6—Flume carrying water to wheel to furnish power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley.

Records for fast work in the construction of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway in the Pacific Northwestern states, when the line is finished next year, may, and doubtless will, be found to establish a new mark in the “winning of the West,” to use the phrase employed as the title of one of his most interesting works, by the President of the United States.

A summary of present day conditions on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul may be gained from the following. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 27, 1906

Grading expected to be far enough advanced by that time to permit contractors to construct new tracks

Right-of-way through Cedar River Valley will be improved as soon as the franchise ordinance permits

Line reaching for Tacoma beyond Black River Junction will parallel the Puget Sound Electric Company

Actual track laying will commence on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul’s line in this state by fall. Grading on the extension up Cedar River Valley from the point near Maple Valley where the St. Paul leaves the tracks of the Columbia & Puget Sound, will begin as soon as the company is notified of the approval of its franchise ordinance.

The camps will be established within a few days. The mills of the state are so busy with orders for rail and cargo shipment that they will be unable to handle the big contract the St. Paul will have to let. As a result a number of portable mills will be sent into the woods along the right of way of the St. Paul and ties will be gotten out at convenient points. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, January 27, 1957

By Lucile McDonald

An almost forgotten structure on the White River is shown in part in the Page 1 color illustration of today’s Magazine Section. It is a drift barrier of concrete piers and cables, built some 40 years ago in an effort to prevent driftwood jams and control floods. The barrier is in the Muckleshoot Reservation, southeast of Auburn. It is reached by way of a road between Newaukum and the Academy District.

An almost forgotten structure on the White River is shown in part in the Page 1 color illustration of today’s Magazine Section. It is a drift barrier of concrete piers and cables, built some 40 years ago in an effort to prevent driftwood jams and control floods. The barrier is in the Muckleshoot Reservation, southeast of Auburn. It is reached by way of a road between Newaukum and the Academy District.

Washington has a river which nobody wanted … the White.

Today the White River’s waters pour into Puget Sound through a channel 20 miles shorter than the one it followed for untold centuries.

Until 1906 the stream flowed northward into the Green River, thence to the Duwamish and the “salt chuck.” Today it empties into the Puyallup, at Sumner, by way of the Stuck—a river which, technically speaking, has disappeared, although its name still is used by Auburn residents and appears on a state-highway bridge.

All of these rivers were once parts of the same great basin, its fingers extending into the mountain valleys. The land, built up by glacial action, eroded easily and the stream channels, made when the area was emerging from the sea, were unstable and sinuous. In flood seasons they sprawled out of banks.

The White River, with its deep mountain canyon and drift jams, was especially menacing and farmers had no love for it. (more…)

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