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Posts Tagged ‘Tacoma’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 17, 1924

One feature of the Pacific Coast Coal Company bunkers on Seattle Harbor, not found in many other ports, is the fact that deep sea vessels may get prompt repairs, when necessary, while bunker coal is being loaded. Immediately adjacent to the bunkers are the large shops of the Pacific Coast Engineering Company, a subsidiary of The Pacific Coast Company, whose trained men and modern equipment are capable of handling any marine repair work except dry docking.

This work is frequently performed while the ship is loading coal, and the vessel can remain in the same slip until the job is completed without interfering with other operations. The picture shows the Westward Ho, an 8,800-ton U.S. Shipping Board carrier, taking on bunkers while undergoing extensive alterations at the same time by the Pacific Coast Engineering Company. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 10, 1924

Seldom are train robbers obliging enough to pose for a photograph, but down at San Luis Obispo, California, the Pacific Coast Railway Company’s “Valley Flier” was recently held up by a band of armed men at Exposition Grounds station, just outside of San Luis Obispo, and this picture attests the fact that there was a photographer in the vicinity. The Rotary Club emblem on the rear coach, however, calls for an explanation.

The train carried a party of Rotarians from Santa Maria and the two-gun bandit in cowboy attire was none other than W.T. Masengill, superintendent of the Pacific Coast Railway, who assisted in removing the passengers and carrying them off into the woods. The Pacific Coast Railway is a subsidiary of The Pacific Coast Company. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 3, 1924

Within the past week a German freighter, the Luise Hemsoth, and a British ocean carrier, the Ashworth, both took bunker coal at the Pacific Coast Coal Company bunkers. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 26, 1924

Diamond Briquets were recently given wide and favorable publicity in Juneau, Alaska, when Harold Lloyd appeared in the film feature, Why Worry, at one of the Juneau theatres. H.G. Walmsley, manager of the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s depot at the Alaskan capital, arranged with the exhibitors of this picture to place fifteen of these 16-foot signs about the city.

Dealers handling Diamond Briquets, from Skagway, Alaska, in the north, to Hornbrook, California, in the south, all report no worries with this popular fuel. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, September 20, 1908

Track-laying rushed in five different places on Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul in Pacific Northwest

New towns spring up along route

Rich agricultural and fruit districts heretofore remote from traffic opened up to development

1—Columbia River bridge, under construction. 2—Steamboat St. Paul, used in construction of Columbia River bridge. 3—Completed piers of Columbia River bridge. 4—Water wheel furnishing power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley. 5—Scene in the timber, Snoqualmie Valley. 6—Flume carrying water to wheel to furnish power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley.

1—Columbia River bridge, under construction. 2—Steamboat St. Paul, used in construction of Columbia River bridge. 3—Completed piers of Columbia River bridge. 4—Water wheel furnishing power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley. 5—Scene in the timber, Snoqualmie Valley. 6—Flume carrying water to wheel to furnish power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley.

Records for fast work in the construction of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway in the Pacific Northwestern states, when the line is finished next year, may, and doubtless will, be found to establish a new mark in the “winning of the West,” to use the phrase employed as the title of one of his most interesting works, by the President of the United States.

A summary of present day conditions on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul may be gained from the following. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 29, 1924

Making hay while the sun shines is a motto which J.F. Torrence, manager of the Pacific Coast Coal Company depot at Tacoma, believes in putting into practice.

Consequently, when coal orders slumped during the hot weather of July he fitted up the office with extra typewriters and employed ten young ladies to operate them until a total of 15,000 letters had been written, addressed and mailed, admonishing an equal number of Tacomans to follow the example of the thrifty and and lay in a winter’s supply of fuel before the chill winds of winter found them with empty coal bins.

The influx of orders which followed necessitated the putting on of another truck to make deliveries. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 22, 1924

Rendering everything from classic selections and overtures to modern waltzes and jazz numbers, the Newcastle Band provided a musical program of exceptional excellence at the Western Washington Mine Rescue and First Aid Meet in Carbonado.

Under the able direction of Bandmaster Archie Johnson the Newcastle Band is much in demand at all social events in the camp. This picture shows the band playing on the field at Carbonado. (more…)

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