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Posts Tagged ‘Tacoma’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 8, 1934

Woodsmen and deputy sheriffs join in search; 5 aboard Spokane-Seattle craft escape uninjured

Miss Helen Curren, Seattle insurance firm cashier, upper left, suffered a leg injury when a United Air Lines planes, in which she was returning from a Wenatchee wedding, crashed in the fog east of Selleck yesterday. Upper right—Miss Marian Bennett, Spokane, plane stewardess, gave first aid to Miss Curran, Pilot Ben Redfield and Robert C. Clarke, Wenatchee passenger, also hurt. Lower—Copilot Dwight Hansen, photographed in Virginia Mason Hospital.—(Miss Curran’s photo by Hartsook.)

Miss Helen Curren, Seattle insurance firm cashier, upper left, suffered a leg injury when a United Air Lines planes, in which she was returning from a Wenatchee wedding, crashed in the fog east of Selleck yesterday. Upper right—Miss Marian Bennett, Spokane, plane stewardess, gave first aid to Miss Curran, Pilot Ben Redfield and Robert C. Clarke, Wenatchee passenger, also hurt. Lower—Copilot Dwight Hansen, photographed in Virginia Mason Hospital.—(Miss Curran’s photo by Hartsook.)

Woodsmen, forest rangers, watershed patrolmen, and Seattle deputy sheriffs today searched through the rain-soaked undergrowth of the Snoqualmie National Forest, thirty miles southeast of Seattle, for Daisy A. Mooney of Winthrop, missing after a United Air Lines plane in which she was a passenger crashed six miles east of Selleck last evening.

She disappeared last evening after a United Air Lines planes, carrying her and five other passengers and a crew of three, crashed in the fog and rain on a mountainside of the high Cascades.

Four persons were injured in the smash, which might have been fatal had it not been for the quick thinking of the pilots and the sturdy construction of the Spokane-to-Seattle plane.

Co-pilot staggers out of wilds

First word of the mishap reached Seattle about 8 o’clock last night when Copilot Dwight Hansen of Spokane, badly injured, staggered out of the wilderness and obtained a rescue party at Selleck. Hansen was taken to Virginia Mason Hospital in Seattle.

In addition to Hansen, who is suffering from a probable broken nose, shock, a deep wound in one leg, and many minor cuts and bruises, the injured include:

Pilot Ben Redfield, Spokane, compound fracture of the left arm.

Robert Clarke, Tacoma state liquor inspector, wrenched back.

Miss Helen Curren, cashier for the Great West Life Assurance Company in Seattle, leg injured but believed unbroken. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 21, 1913

Postmaster & Postmistress Fred H. & Antoinette Tonkin with little Jim in their home #105 on 3rd Ave.

Postmaster & Postmistress Fred H. & Antoinette Tonkin with little Jim in their home #105 on 3rd Ave.

Black Diamond man is practically certain of becoming grand chancellor of Washington Knights

Few contests for officers are apparent: Approximately 1,000 men and 200 women members of auxiliary order are attending sessions in Tacoma

TACOMA, Wednesday, May 21 — When the Washington Grand Lodge of the Knights of Pythias, now meeting here in the order’s thirtieth annual state convention, went into session this afternoon behind closed doors for the annual election of officers, the elevation of Fred H. Tonkin, of Black Diamond, to the position of grand chancellor was regarded as a foregone conclusion. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 8, 1907

President A.J. Earling of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul gave out a statement in Milwaukee today to the effect that the St. Paul will complete the construction of its Pacific Coast line by 1909 and will be running trains into Seattle before the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition opens.

In connection with this announcement, Earling confirmed the report that the St. Paul has ordered the vacation of all property sold to his road in Tacoma and will immediately begin work on the terminal system of the St. Paul in that city. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 7, 2015

By Bill Kombol

Railroads played a key role in the development of most King County towns, including Ravensdale. The arrival of the nation’s second transcontinental railway, the Northern Pacific (NP) in 1883 dramatically accelerated growth throughout the Washington Territory.

The development of a production-scale coal mine required a rail link to deliver the massive equipment needed to operate the mine and to transport the coal to market.

The extension of the Columbia and Puget Sound (C&PS) railway in 1884 from Renton by Henry Villard’s Oregon Improvement Company enabled the coal mines at Cedar Mountain (1884), Black Diamond (late 1884), Franklin (1885), and Danville (1896) to begin production. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, January 18, 1907

Trainmen call on authorities for help but sheriff and police are conveniently absent

Railroad had been warned of the contemplated action

North Yakima, Jan. 9 — More than 200 desperate citizens of this city and farmers of the surrounding country held up a coal train at the station here at 3:30 yesterday afternoon and carried off all the fuel they needed to tide them over the cold snap. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, January 14, 1968

So here’s to the gallant reporters,
The boys with the pencils and pads,
The calm, undisturbable, cool, imperturbable,
Nervy, inquisitive lads.

Chester (Chet) Gibbon

Chester (Chet) Gibbon

Chester (Chet) Gibbon never wanted to be anything but a newspaper reporter from the time a Maple Valley fourth-grade teacher assigned a class theme.

Young Chester, writing in longhand, lined out column rules, wrote vivid stories, and tacked on headlines. His first front page.

Gibbon now is 68, still slender and erect, and something of an oddity in our shirt-sleeves business because he always wears his suit coat. He pulled a yellowed piece of copy paper from his desk in The Seattle Times the other day. It contained the Franklin P. Adam poem (1920 vintage) from which the above lines were cribbed.

“That sort of says it,” Gibbon said. (more…)

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Extracted from Carbonado: The History of a Coal Mining Town in the Foothills of Mount Rainier, 1880-1937, by John Hamilton Streepy, May 1999

Row of tombstones from the December 9, 1899 catastrophe at Carbonado.

Row of tombstones from the December 9, 1899 catastrophe at Carbonado.

Rees Jones, the fireboss, declared mine number seven clear of gas on 9 December 1899, and allowed the morning shift to enter the mine to begin their workday. With his pipe and tobacco firmly in his pocket, Ben Zedler and seventy-two others started their long march into the depths of the earth to mine coal on the shift from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.1 (more…)

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