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Posts Tagged ‘Tacoma’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 13, 1925

Probably the deepest beneath the earth’s surface at which a radio test was ever made, representatives of the Radio Corporation of America and Sherman, Clay Co., of Seattle, with officials of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, recently attempted to log Seattle broadcasting stations from the 12th level of Black Diamond mine. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 6, 1925

Constant practice makes perfect, and adherence to this truth makes the Black Diamond Mine Rescue Team one of the best. This picture shows the team with its apparatus in place and ready to enter the mine where their skill would enable them to be of invaluable assistance in case of need.

A.G. Wallace, captain of the team, was a member of the Washington Champions in 1923, which went from Black Diamond to Salt Lake City, winning third prize in the International contest held there. From left to right: Joe Bisch, Joe Meza, A. McDonald, A. Kirkbride, Fred Goldner, and A.G. Wallace. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 30, 1925

No feature of the First Aid and Mine Rescue Meet held last Saturday at Black Diamond attracted more attention than the exhibition in first aid and resuscitation work put on by the midget teams from Newcastle and Black Diamond. So far as is known, these two teams are the youngest First Aid teams in the world.

Fathers of the boys are miners employed by the Pacific Coast Coal Company, and the interest displayed by the youngsters is indicative of the efforts put forth by everyone to make mining safe. Members of the Newcastle team, in the front row, include Ernie Bahr, Howard Cotterill, Donald Gilbert, Clyde Joughlin, John Young, and Wm. Schuirman.

The Black Diamond boys, in the back row, are Elmon Rouse, John Gallagher, Harold Lloyd, Jr., Benny Hughes, Oliver Rouse, Jimmy Nicholson, and Ellis Ash. Harold Lloyd, Sr., trained the Black Diamond team and Wm. Jones was the instructor for the Newcastle lads. (more…)

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Originally published in Carbon River Heritage, July 1986

Photo by Nancy Irene Hall

June 22, 1986, the Tacoma Model T Club posed at the Wilkeson Arch to commemorate its 60th anniversary. The cars used were 1926 models. The beautiful historic arch was given to the town of Wilkeson on July 2, 1926, by the Wilkeson Booster Club.

The present day Wilkeson Booster Club is planning to recrown her soon with a new cedar log. It cost $2,000 to build it originally and all the money was raised by the Wilkeson Boosters. It was made of Wilkeson Sandstone quarried just a few miles from the site on which the arch now stands. For 60 years everyone going to the Carbon River entrance to Mount Rainier has passed under this grand monument. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 18, 1925

More than a mile from the entrance to the tunnel, the Bulletin photographer secured this picture in the Carbonado Mine when the Bruiser Seam was visited by a party of newspaper men last Monday. At the extreme left Supt S.H. Ash is seen telling Nettie Gilpatrick to watch the two miners, if she wants to learn how to dig coal. There being no gas in this tunnel, open flame lights are employed. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 4, 1925

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today's Gene Coulon Park.

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today’s Gene Coulon Park.

More than million briquets made daily

In 1914 the Briquet Plant was opened and has run continuously since that time. It operates two shifts of eight hours each and produces five hundred tons of briquets a day. That means that more than one and one-half million briquets are made each day.

The briquets are made from a combination of Black Diamond and South Prairie coals. The first of these give it its free burning quality and low ash and the last, a coking coal, gives it its strength and fire holding power. The binder used is a specially prepared form of asphalt from which the stickiness has been removed.

The trip through the plant will be in the direction in which the coal is run, beginning at the point where the raw coal is received and ending at the point where the finished briquet goes into the railroad cars. (more…)

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By Bill Kombol

King County Assessor tax parcel No. 112106-9035

The location of the Black Diamond branch of Mount Rainier Bank [Columbia Bank, 2019] has a short, but interesting history.

The property is located in the south half of Section 11, Township 21 North, Range 6 East, W.M. Like all odd-numbered sections in this area, the property in Section 11 was originally part of a land grant by the United States to the Northern Pacific Railroad in 1873 for construction of a transcontinental railroad. In adjacent even-numbered sections, the Black Diamond Coal Mining Company had begun mining coal after moving their operations north from the Mount Diablo coal fields near Nortonville, California, east of San Francisco. (more…)

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