Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Tahoma School District’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 10, 1979

By D’Ann Pedee

The event above is past history, but Tahoma High School’s new reader board is very much up-to-date, being installed only last week.

The event above is past history, but Tahoma High School’s new reader board is very much up-to-date, being installed only last week.

A dream became a reality last week as a blue and gold Tahoma reader board was erected.

For years, students and school personnel have wanted a means to advertise school sports and other events. With student monetary support, parental donations and labor, and the blessing of administrators, the sign stood in place advertising a recent home game.

The board is located on SE 240th at the south edge of Tahoma’s campus and can be read from both the Kent and Maple Valley entrances to the school.

“This sign has been years in planning,” said Pete Ryan, athletic director who is currently in charge of the sign’s upkeep. (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Valley Daily News, August 14, 1995

By Lyle Price
Valley Daily News

Maple Valley grade school’s exterior hasn’t changed much in 75 years. (Valley Daily News photos by Marcus R. Donner.)

Maple Valley grade school’s exterior hasn’t changed much in 75 years. (Valley Daily News photos by Marcus R. Donner.)

MAPLE VALLEY—At 75, the former Maple Valley Grade School may be showing its age, but it is far from retired.

In fact, it could get a face-lift to extend its life well into the next century.

No longer home to students, the eye-catching brick building serves as headquarters for the Tahoma School District’s maintenance and transportation operations.

In addition, the Maple Valley Historical Society operates a museum on the top floor, under a 10-year lease from the district. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 7, 1978

The following material has been presented to the Voice by Ann Phinney after the sale of the Phinney part of the “Burtenshaw property” they owned many years.

“This is the history of the Burtenshaw homestead as written by the oldest daughter, Estella Burtenshaw Macmillian, and given to us July 6, 1953, after we bought the homestead in the summer of 1951,” Mrs. Phinney says.

By Estella Burtenshaw Macmillian

Though showing inevitable ravages of time, this Burtenshaw barn still stands on its original site off S.E. 216th in Maple Valley. Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.

Though showing inevitable ravages of time, this Burtenshaw barn still stands on its original site off S.E. 216th in Maple Valley. Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.

William A. Burtenshaw came to Washington Territory from Oregon, driving a team of horses across the country by the Overland route.

During the winter of 1884 he drove the first team of horses into Maple Valley, where previous to this time there were but two yoke of oxen.

He filed on the homestead of 120 acres situated twelve miles east of Renton (This land extended up to and included the little house, which used to be the Shaw’s store, by the now Junior High—note by AHP.)

The family lived in a tent two years. In 1886 he built the first house. Soon after that he built the first part of the barn. A few years later he added the larger part. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 29, 1972

The King County Council has directed the Environmental Development Commission and the Department of Planning to study the eastern portion of the county to enable the establishment of an updated zoning code.

This area has been divided up and Black Diamond and Maple Valley have been lumped together for study and presentation. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 24, 1976

Forty-nine new homes in the Greater Maple Valley area are planned to be built on 48 acres on the southwest side of the Cedar River, downstream from the Landsburg County Park, the Voice has learned.

The project will be called the Cedar Bend Housing Development and a hearing will be held on April 20 at the King County Courthouse. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, February 20, 1927

Three towns will be served by splendid structure in Union District on Cedar River

The photograph shows the new $65,000 structure in which a Taylor-Hobart-Maplevalley union high school will open tomorrow, and Earl D. Bonham, superintendent of the district.

The photograph shows the new $65,000 structure in which a Taylor-Hobart-Maplevalley union high school will open tomorrow, and Earl D. Bonham, superintendent of the district.

Like a youngster who appears wearing his first long trousers, the Seattle community shows its rapid growth by definite new things. Just as such a boy surprises you some morning, so do pleasant surprises like the new Union High School at Maplevalley, hit the observer with not unpleasant frequency.

The Tahoma High School opens tomorrow in a $65,000 building a mile east of Maplevalley, and twenty-nine miles from downtown Seattle.

All that region, which is tapped by the Cedar River, along which is a paved road almost to the town of Maplevalley, is on the rise. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Times, February 16, 1927

Residents of Hobart and Taylor join in dedication of Union High for district

Five hundred residents of Maple Valley, Hobart, and Taylor last night joined in a program dedicating the $65,000 high school building at Maple Valley.

A.S. Burrows of Seattle, King County superintendent of schools, reminded the audience of the development which had taken place in their communities since he first made his way by trails and poor roads to visit schools there. He lauded the people for keeping step with this development by organizing the Tahoma Union High School District and erecting the building. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »