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Posts Tagged ‘Talbot’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 9, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The remodeled company store for the Pacific Coast Coal Co. built around 1890 in Burnett now houses the "Pinch Plum" gift shop.

The remodeled company store for the Pacific Coast Coal Co. built around 1890 in Burnett now houses the “Pinch Plum” gift shop. — Photo by Barbara Nilson.

In 1891 the former mining town of Burnett, located about two and a half miles from Wilkeson and 6 miles from Enumclaw, estimated its population at 400 people. Today possibly less than 100 people live in the 32 homes with water hookups. Some of the homes are still the miner’s cottages from the turn of the century when it was an important coal-mining center.

It was situated on the Burnett branch of the Northern Pacific railroad and was sustained by the mines of Pacific Coast Coal Co. that employed around 300 men. There were several business places in upper Burnett, including the company store, which has been remodeled into The Pinch Plum gift shop by Jay and Dailene Argo. Argo, who bought the building in 1977, said he tried to keep the building as authentic as possible. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 8, 1922

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

Pacific Coast Coal Co. Logo 1922For the purpose of this paper, the Cedar River coal area will include the coal mines and coal beds discovered and developed at Renton and vicinity, and also at Cedar Mountain. These two areas are properly within the Cedar River watershed.

Renton district

As stated in a previous paper, coal was found on Black River in the vicinity of Renton in 1853 by Dr. M. Bigelow. A small mine was opened and coal was shipped by boat down Black River, then along the Duwamish River to Seattle, but in 1855 an Indian outbreak occurred in which two of the men interested in the project were killed, and the mine was abandoned. (more…)

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Originally published by the Renton Chronicle, October 2, 1963

By Morda Slauson

MINE ENTRANCE FOUND - Interested in mines for more than 50 years, “Judge” J.E. McFarland is intrigued by what lies underneath the surface of the ground. When he heard the entrance to the old Renton Coal Co. mine had been uncovered, he was one of the first to visit the site. Though his mining interests in Alaska, Canada and Eastern Washington have been concerned with gold, silver and other metals, rather than coal, he still is captivated by the sight of any mine.

MINE ENTRANCE FOUND – Interested in mines for more than 50 years, “Judge” J.E. McFarland is intrigued by what lies underneath the surface of the ground. When he heard the entrance to the old Renton Coal Co. mine had been uncovered, he was one of the first to visit the site. Though his mining interests in Alaska, Canada and Eastern Washington have been concerned with gold, silver and other metals, rather than coal, he still is captivated by the sight of any mine.

Forty-five years ago Walt Reid, well known Renton businessman and member of the city council, turned off the power and stopped the pumps in the Renton Coal Company mine at the foot of Talbot Hill.

Last week R.L. Moss & Co. of Zenith, working on the Tukwila freeway [today’s I-405] which will cross the Benson road just above the mine site, uncovered the main entrance to the old mine. Heavy timbers and a gate guard this tunnel mouth which, according to Reid, goes straight in on the level for 1,000 feet and then down at a 15 degree pitch for 5,280 feet.

The huge shovel working on the freeway first uncovered the tunnel outside the gate and then began to scoop out old coal cars, wheels, scrap iron and large squared timbers. Water poured out of the mine and formed the pool, still standing six to eight feet deep in front of the entrance.

Many members of old time Renton families have driven up the hill to look at what was once Renton’s main industry. (more…)

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