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Posts Tagged ‘The Coast’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 25, 1957

By Lucile McDonald

Honor H. Wilhelm as he appeared in his later years.

Honor H. Wilhelm as he appeared in his later years.

Two daughters of the late Rev. Honor L. Wilhelm‚ have been going through the trunks, papers, library, and attic in a 70-year-old house at 2258 W. 61st St. trying to place in some sort of order the literary legacy of a one-time Seattle publisher.

Mr. Wilhelm, who died May 21, edited The Coast magazine from 1902 to 1910.

Mrs. Wilhelm, unable to move around much because of a hip injury, was aided by her daughters, Helen (Mrs. Arvid Sagor) of 2148 N. 63rd St. and Margaret (Mrs. Ronald L. Cripe) of Enumclaw in closing the house, which was to be sold.

In the 40 years the Wilhelms lived in it the dwelling gradually filled with the owner’s literary output. Mr. Wilhelm wrote poems for every occasion. He wrote autobiographies from his boyhood. He edited several publications. (more…)

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Originally published in The Coast magazine, June 1, 1906

The Green River above Franklin, Washington

The Green River above Franklin, Washington

June is the month and summer is the time in which to take a trip to Black Diamond and Franklin, Washington, for then the trees are green and blooming flowers fill the air with pleasing odors; for then the sportsman can whip the fish-filled Green River and lure the gamey trout from placid pools to repose within his basket; the birds fill the air with charming melodies; all nature smiles and glows with new and increasing life to shine in growing splendor; and, then, the grand snow-capped mountain—Mt. Rainier—looks more beautiful and lovely than at any other time of the year as it towers high above all its surroundings, a crystal gem of purest white, held in a setting of everlasting and eternal green. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 8, 2014

By Bill Kombol

The Green River Gorge is gorgeous to behold and a beautiful oasis on idyllic summer days. This June 1977 photo was taken by Vic Condiotty.

The Green River Gorge is gorgeous to behold and a beautiful oasis on idyllic summer days. This June 1977 photo was taken by Vic Condiotty.

The single-lane bridge over the Green River Gorge is a vista to behold as you cross 150 feet above the river; and even more remarkable when looking up. The bridge was built in 1915 to replace earlier wooden crossings that served the nearby coal mining town of Franklin founded in 1885 by the Oregon Improvement Company. (more…)

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Originally published in The Coast, August 1906

By J.W. Bussy, Black Diamond

Jones Lake 14 - Oct 1909 - photo 578 - BDHS 2003.87It was a delightful afternoon the early part of June. A fresh breeze ruffled the waters of Lake Jones into tiny waves, as we rowed out to the middle of the stream, our destination being the inlet at the farther end of that body of water which the sinking sun was rapidly transforming into a sheet of quivering gold.

A hasty glace revealed the unwelcome fact that we were not the only “pebbles on the beach.” Indeed in the shadows of the tall firs on the opposite shore were dimly outlined no less than three other boats, each with its eager angler. (more…)

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Originally published in The Coast, May 1905

TheCoastFamed throughout the world is the coal of the Black Diamond and Franklin mines, which are located in King County, Washington, and owned and operated by the Pacific Coast Company, of Seattle.

Two towns are here established—Black Diamond and Franklin—the first having a population of about 700 and the latter 300. The land upon which these places are situated is owned by the company and the improvements and advancement made are due to the operations in mining and shipping coal.

These two towns are situated southeast of Seattle in the foothills of the Cascades and near them runs the beautiful Green River. The scenery is mountainous with heavy timber covering the slopes and valleys.

The climate is of the mild Puget Sound character, chilled alone by the cooler breezes due to the altitude. The Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad maintain a daily passenger and express service between here and Seattle, which line is operated by the Pacific Coast Company. (more…)

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Originally published in The Coast, June 1909

Store and residence of W.D. Gibbon, Maple Valley, Washington.

Store and residence of W.D. Gibbon, Maple Valley, Washington.

The building of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad to the Pacific Coast has done more than merely make another means of crossing the American continent; it has opened up a new country in many instances better and larger in opportunities than what now has railroad transportation and has lessened the rates where railroads were already running.

In King County one of the important places upon this road is Maple Valley, where its main line from the east, after crossing the Cascade Mountains, forms a junction with the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, a line which has been in operation between the coal mines of King County at Black Diamond and Seattle for the past quarter century and longer. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, January 2010

By Frank Hammock

It’s made of stringers, portal struts, top and bottom chords, top and bottom lateral bracing, sway bracing, portal and counter bracing, diagonals, inclined end and vertical posts, floor beams, and panels. Geometrically, it’s composed of a series of triangles joined together by pins and rivets that is either structurally built above or below the main traffic component called the deck. From its design, it is only subject to compression and tension forces, whereby bending forces have been eliminated. Thus, the various arrangements of its members make the final determination as to what type it will be categorized as—boasting such names as Parker, Howe, Camelback, Queen Post, Warren, Kellogg, Stearns, and Pratt. These are the basic descriptions of the Truss bridge that originated in the history of structural engineering from as early as 1820, to a more common use era of 1870 to 1930 during the railroad boom. (more…)

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