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Posts Tagged ‘Tiger Mountain’

Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, November 1996

Dear Bugle and Maple Valley Historical Society:
I might be able to give a little more history of Maple Valley and Hobart. Hobart was where the Sidebothams finally homesteaded or staked their claim to live.

I am not sure who came into the area first, Sidebothams or Peacocks—a few generations passed before it got to me. I would be the last to carry the Sidebotham name until my sons came along. I married Erma Lissman, graduate of Renton High School and a native of Roundup, Montana. We have four grown kids. I moved from Hobart fourteen miles to Kennydale.

Pacific Coast Railroad No. 12 leads eastbound freight at Hobart, ca. 1942.

Pacific Coast Railroad No. 12 leads eastbound freight at Hobart, ca. 1942.

Hobart and Maple Valley were just four miles apart, then (going east) came the town of Taylor. The town of Kerriston was the last little settlement or community in the timber.

Hobart thrived on logging. Wood & Iverson had a sawmill, a company store, and a bunkhouse that housed (board and room) about 100 loggers. There were three rows of company houses for loggers and families to live in. Many people had a little stump ranch with a few livestock, worked at the mill or logging camp, and went to Alaska for the fishing season for salmon. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, December 14, 1977

By R. Dianne Wilson

Here part of the crew at “The Black Diamond” greets customers through window artwork created by Mary Collier. – Bob Gerbing photo.

Here part of the crew at “The Black Diamond” greets customers through window artwork created by Mary Collier. – Bob Gerbing photo.

That Christmas is coming to Black Diamond was very much evidenced by a visit, last week, to the city’s branch of the First National Bank of Enumclaw. Windows were painted, wreaths adorned the walls, and the bank staff was busily trimming the Christmas tree with decorations made by each of the classes at Black Diamond Elementary School. There were even a few “ho, ho, ho’s.”

The festivities were perfectly in keeping with the spirit of warmth and friendliness exhibited year round in the bank. The captain of this happy crew is Dave Miller, bank manager since May of this year. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 16, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

This huge sawmill was the center of the Wood & Iverson operations in Hobart from 1913 to 1941. The mill pond was in the foreground. The site now is an area of swampy ground which will be crossed by a new road.

This huge sawmill was the center of the Wood & Iverson operations in Hobart from 1913 to 1941. The mill pond was in the foreground. The site now is an area of swampy ground which will be crossed by a new road.

Memories are becoming more dear to the pioneers of this area as progress changes the very face of the land.

For instance, where the new Primary State Highway No. 2, Echo Lake Branch, now under construction, will cross a stretch of swampy ground on a viaduct near Hobart, east of Maple Valley, a large mill once made the countryside echo with the sound of saws and the blast of its whistle summoning men to work.

The highway climbs along Holder Creek Canyon through vestiges of a forest that fed its logs to the Wood & Iverson mill from 1913 to 1941. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, April 9, 1980

By Louis T. Corsaletti
Times suburban reporter

The dotted line shows the area to be covered by the communities plan.

The dotted line shows the area to be covered by the communities plan.

TAHOMA-RAVEN HEIGHTS — More than 115 years ago the discovery of vast coal deposits drew settlers to the remote Squak Mountain, Issaquah and Newcastle regions. But now the sprawling reserves of undeveloped land are spawning rapid growth in the 150-square mile area from Issaquah south to Black Diamond.

So last August, King County planners assisting a citizens’ committee began the tremendous task of planning for the future of what is called the Tahoma/Raven Heights Communities Plan area—the largest plan undertaken so far.

A recently prepared profile on Tahoma/Raven Heights shows that between 1970 and 1980, the population has grown from about 19,500 to about 26,000. And forecasts indicate a population of almost 40,000 by 1990. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 16 and 23, 1977

By Jalo Lahtinen

Self-styled stump jumper Jalo Lahtinen of Hobart, standing here along the modern version of the East Fork of Issaquah Creek, reminisces about Hobart 59 years ago in the following article and offers some reflections on the present as well as sage advice for the future. He calls his piece, “Musings of a not-to-smart stump rancher,” but we’ll leave it to the reader as to whether or not this should be taken literally. — Ed. (Photo by Bob Gerbing.)

Self-styled stump jumper Jalo Lahtinen of Hobart, standing here along the modern version of the east fork of Issaquah Creek, reminisces about Hobart 59 years ago in the following article and offers some reflections on the present as well as sage advice for the future. He calls his piece, “Musings of a not-to-smart stump rancher,” but we’ll leave it to the reader as to whether or not this should be taken literally. — Ed. (Photo by Bob Gerbing.)

When you tell someone you’re from Hobart, “Where is Hobart?” they ask.

It is at the headwaters of Issaquah Creek, the two forks known to us old stump jumpers by the following names—north fork as Holder’s Creek, east fork as Carry’s Creek.

It’s part of Cedar River Valley, nestled in the foothills of the Cascades with an eastern view of the Stampede Pass area and Mount Rainier to the south.

Once a sawmill town and farming area with self-sustaining farms and part-time stump farmers it was a paradise, a boy’s dream. Our mountains—Tiger, Taylor, and Sherwood were covered with the forest primeval, a cathedral of the Gods, an emerald jewel that God dropped in the right location, only a three-to-four mile area.

Near the summit of Sherwood is a beautiful spring two to three feet across, a trickle of the most beautiful blue water you could lay your eyes on running out of it—cold, refreshing, and thirst quenching.

Our streams were full of spawning salmon and land-locked sockeye in the fall, spawning by the hundreds. We called them red fish, cut-throat, and steelhead—no trick to catch a mess at any time. (more…)

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By Bill Longwell

Originally published in the Issaquah Alps Trails Club newsletter, date unknown

Coal oil, which is distilled from shale coal, was used to lubricate the saw blade. Just about any bottle would do as this 7-UP bottle shows. The hook was used to hang the bottle on a log.

Coal oil, which is distilled from shale coal, was used to lubricate the saw blade. Just about any bottle would do as this 7-UP bottle shows. The hook was used to hang the bottle on a log.

Anyone who likes looking at old-time logging books or pictures surely knows that after loggers felled the giant trees of the old forests, someone had to buck them into lengths. Different cross-cut saws felled and bucked. Bucking was a one-person job, and one saw blade often lasted two days. The cutter placed a handle on one end for one day, and the next day switched ends until each side of the blade dulled. Then during the night an expert re-sharpened the saw.

After looking closely at these old-time pictures, the viewer can almost always notice a dark bottle hanging from the log that the cutter bucked, a bottle filled with coal oil, which lubricated the saw blades. Today cutters use WD-10/40. Ask Ken Hopping, who does most of the cross-cut sawing for IATC [Issaquah Alps Trails Club].

Buckers always had to watch for these large logs rolling back on them as they were finishing their cut. These trees, often ten-feet thick, and not the 18-inch logs that grow in forests today, were always dangerous. A bucker must always have his wits about him; he could not afford carelessness. So a well-oiled saw was necessary, and coal oil served the purpose. (more…)

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By Irving Petite

Originally published in The News Mill [Issaquah], September 22, 1976

Before Bill McCauley and I bought land on Tiger Mountain in 1941, we had explored Western Washington’s unimproved land-for-sale from Darrington, north, to Randle, south, and from Twin Lakes in the Cascade Mountains to Shine, across Hood Canal from Seabeck on the Olympic Peninsula.

In the process, 35 years ago, we surveyed acreage for sale at Kerriston. Weekends (days when Bill was not doing jackhammer work at Mud Mountain Dam and I was not attending the university) during the summer and fall of 1940, we sometimes drove Bill’s 1936 Nash to logged-off land a timber company’s map showed to be for sale at Kerriston. It was reached by going south to Renton (the first floating bridge was not complete), southeast to Hobart, then east into the Cascade foothills.

A few miles east of Hobart the road V’d. Straight ahead, on the crest of Taylor Mountain, stood the town of Taylor with is Gladding McBean kilns for the firing of bricks and tile. (In later years, fire bricks for our own hearths were to come from Taylor … and giant tiles for our chimney flues.) When we drove up there once in 1940, a cow with a bell was ringleading several other cows down the main street.

Now there is a gate across that road’s mouth and Taylor (whose kiln stacks—once air hazards—have been removed) is in Cedar River Watershed.

But a gravel road still leads right. In 1940 and for years following it was purely a one-way road between the fences and “no trespassing” signs of Cedar River Watershed. Where, at the far end it opened into the land for sale, we found it to be jumbled hillsides folding into ravines and pothole-like depressions on both sides of a disused logging grade. (more…)

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