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Posts Tagged ‘tipples’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 14, 1924

Deep down in the canyon of the Carbon River, and some distance down the stream from the mine tunnel entrances, is situated the bunkers and tipple of Carbonado Mine. The topography of the place fortunately permits the use of gravity to a very large extent in the handling of the coal. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, February 1992

“ATTRACTIVE SIGN BOARD: Occupying a conspicuous position on North Wenatchee Avenue, directly in front of the yards of the Wenatchee branch of Pacific Coast Coal Co., is a big illuminated billboard which bears the catchy slogan, ‘A BLACK business but we treat you WHITE.’ Manager H.H. Boyd is the author of this slogan, and the volume of business handled though the Wenatchee yard testifies to the fact that Boyd lives up to his statement.” – Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 8, 1925

“ATTRACTIVE SIGN BOARD: Occupying a conspicuous position on North Wenatchee Avenue, directly in front of the yards of the Wenatchee branch of Pacific Coast Coal Co., is a big illuminated billboard which bears the catchy slogan, ‘A BLACK business but we treat you WHITE.’ Manager H.H. Boyd is the author of this slogan, and the volume of business handled though the Wenatchee yard testifies to the fact that Boyd lives up to his statement.” – Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 8, 1925

Mining, just like other professions, has a good many words which are used by people in the profession. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, November 1997

By Eva Litras

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

This is a story about the Elkcoal Mine—located off the Kangley-Kanasket Road. We moved there in 1929 and lived in a small house on Sugarloaf Mountain. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 1, 1923

Situated at the mouth of the slope the view shown above of the top works at Burnett Mine, the home of South Prairie Coal, does not give any idea of the depth of the gorge through which South Prairie creek flows. The buildings in the foreground are but half way between the creek below and the top of the hill from which the bridge extends across the yawning gorge.

At the left is seen the wash house, while the long building in the center of the picture houses the machine shop and lamp room. Just back of them can be seen the top of the tipple, indicating the depth of the valley below. In the background is seen the rock dump and the big steel span which bridges the creek. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 29, 1922

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

George Watkin Evans (1876-1951), 1924 Courtesy Seattle and Environs

George Watkin Evans, 1924

Pacosco, as it is now called, was formerly Franklin. This district was first opened on the banks of Green River on the McKay Coal Seam about 1885. The railroad was extended from Black Diamond in order to develop this coal area.

Originally, Franklin Mine was opened by a drift driven on the McKay Coal at bunker level above the old railroad grade. Later a water level gangway was driven from the edge of Green River and the coal hoisted up an incline on the surface and dumped over the same tipple as that from the upper level. Later a slope was sunk on another bed which underlies the McKay and all of the coal below the original bunker level was hauled through this opening.

Numerous slopes were sunk at Franklin and also one shaft was developed. Most of the coal was mined from the McKay Bed but some was also mined from two underlying beds, the Number Twelve and the Number Ten. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 13, 1988

By Louis T. Corsaletti
Seattle Times Eastside bureau

One of the Newcastle coal-mine rescue teams in 1924 included, from left, B.F. Snook (the captain), George Hasku, Walter Clark, Joe Ansberger and George Munson.

One of the Newcastle coal-mine rescue teams in 1924 included, from left, B.F. Snook (the captain), George Hasku, Walter Clark, Joe Ansberger and George Munson.

It was an economic boom that lasted for more than 50 years—one that helped put Seattle and the Eastside on the map.

And it was a force that almost overnight turned this part of the Pacific Northwest into an ethnic melting pot.

Described in newspapers of the day, it was called “coal rush” and “coal fever.”

Coal. Black diamonds. Black gold. (more…)

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Originally published in Coal Age, December 10, 1925

Mile-long drift under Cedar Mountain gives old Black Diamond operation an outlet only 17 miles from city for 2,000 ton output

Electric hauling motor at New Black Diamond Mine, ca. 1927

Electric hauling motor at New Black Diamond Mine, ca. 1927

The last piece of rock separating the ends of the Pacific Coast Coal Co.’s tunnel under Cedar Mountain was blasted through on Oct. 16, thus completing an underground passage over a mile in length through which coal from the New Black Diamond Mine will be delivered to the tipple on the Pacific Coast R.R.

Completion of this tunnel—the two ends met fairly—is an engineering feat of no mean importance.

One end of this passage was driven from daylight while the other started in the mine workings on the other side of the mountain. Junction of the two sections was effected almost exactly midway between their starting points. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 7, 1922

Manager of Mines Botting, on left, and “Dad” Ritchie on right, alternate chairman of Central Council.

Manager of Mines Botting, on left, and “Dad” Ritchie on right, alternate chairman of Central Council.

D.C. Botting, our new Manager of Mines, has taken up his duties, and is now in full charge of the mining operations of the Pacific Coast Coal Company.

His arrival in Seattle had been timed so as to enable him to be present at the meeting of the Central Council in Seattle on Saturday, Sept. 2, as well as to attend the Mine Rescue competition at Burnett, where he met many notables, among them Geo. S. Rice, Chief Mining Engineer of the U. S. Bureau of Mines; but it so happened that other opportunities arose for hastening his introduction to the activities of the company.

Scarcely installed in his office in the Smith Building, his presence was required at Issaquah, and the first glimpse had of him by some of the miners there was of him wearing overalls and a carbide lamp.

The day following he visited at Black Diamond, where he once worked as a machinist, and where he now saw the throngs of workmen putting the finishing touches on the bunkers, preparatory to starting the great electric hoist. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 8, 1922

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

Black Diamond-area mines

This hand drawn map from the article, “Black Diamond-area mines,” was published in the August 1987 issue of the BDHS newsletter. (See http://wp.me/pDbRj-J9.)

We are now ready to take up the Black Diamond area of the coal fields of the State of Washington. The Black Diamond area was opened at a much earlier date than the Ravensdale area.

The old Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, now the Pacific Coast Railway, which has played such an important part in the early development of Seattle and vicinity, was extended from Renton up the Cedar River Valley, thence across the gravel plains in the neighborhood of Lake Wilderness to what is now Black Diamond.

Mine No. 14, Black Diamond, was opened in 1884 by the Black Diamond Coal Company, which was originally incorporated in California, and operated a mine at Mount Diablo. This company was composed of such well-known persons as Alvinza Hayward, P.B. Cornwall, and Morgan Morgans. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 1, 2008

By Bill Kombol

A picking table was typically a moving conveyor or the deck at the end of a vibrating screen where miners separated the good, clean coal from the shale and rock.

A picking table was typically a moving conveyor or the deck at the end of a vibrating screen where miners separated the good, clean coal from the shale and rock.

The fine coal would fall through the screens while the larger size “nut” and “lump” coal was sorted by hand.

A picking table was located in the surface building called the tipple or mine bunkers.

The town of Franklin was located on the hillside above the Green River Gorge about two miles east of Black Diamond.

The Cannon mine was named for Henry W. Cannon, President and Chairman of the Board of the New Jersey-based Pacific Coast Company, which operated mines through its subsidiary Pacific Coast Coal Company of New York.

This photo is from the Museum of History and Industry and known as MOHAI # SH19,186 (1978.6585.436).

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