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Posts Tagged ‘Tukwila’

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, July 6, 1988

Relief for the Black Diamond police department didn’t ride into town on a white steed Friday afternoon, but came in a black and white Black Diamond police car and the form of 27-year-old Tom Hill.

Hill, a part-time Black Diamond officer for the past 2 ½ years, was hired June 27 to fill a vacancy created late last year when officer Gary Koutouvidis took a job with the Tukwila police department. (more…)

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Originally published in The News Tribune, January 16, 1995

Assessed property value climbing in remote areas

By Kevin Ebi
The News Tribune

Randy Hopper was transferred to his firm’s Tukwila office from San Diego, but he and his family have chosen to live in an Enumclaw subdivision to get away from the problems of city living. (Peter Haley/The News Tribune)

Last year, Randy Hopper received more than a promotion.

He got a new quality of life.

The promotion took his family from the bright lights of San Diego to the rural life of Enumclaw.

Hopper, who didn’t want his job or employer revealed, is part of a trend being seen in Enumclaw and other rural cities in the county. It’s a trend of growth.

Even though the King County real estate boom ended in 1990, areas such as Black Diamond, Carnation, Duvall, Enumclaw, and North Bend continue to grow in value. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, December 16, 1921

Farmers living in the White River Valley were obliged to drive their cattle to the hills for safety.

Renton, Tukwila, and Riverton are under water and people traveling about the towns are obliged to wear hip boots or go on a raft.

Here in Enumclaw many basements were flooded by surface water but little serious damage has been done. Travel between here and Seattle on the highway was stopped by high water near Kent. That city suffered considerable from inundation.

Estimated cost of damage to roads and other losses in King County may run over $400,000.

The flood conditions have been worse than in any season for many years.

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