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Posts Tagged ‘unions’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 11, 1913

Men employed in collieries of Pacific Coast Company quit in sympathy with discharged committeeman

Organization growing about Black Diamond

Seven hundred miners employed in the three collieries of the Pacific Coast Company at Black Diamond walked out this morning because the company had refused to reinstate George Ayers, a member of the “pit committee,” reputed to be an I.W.W. organizer in the Black Diamond district.

Ayers was discharged following a quarrel with a subforman named Mitchell, with whom he had taken up a grievance of a miner who had not been supplied with a “bucker.” Ayers is said to have become abusive when Mitchell told him that he had no authority to regulate employment. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 3, 1913

iwwMembers of the United Mine Workers of America, having unionized practically all the collieries in this state, may have to clash with the I.W.W. [Industrial Workers of the World] to retain control of the west side camps.

According to mine employees and operators the I.W.W. is attempting to force its way into the mining camps, but thus far has made no marked headway. The union officials believe that the I.W.W. will be no more popular in the mining camps than it has been among loggers, and during the past year I.W.W. organizers have been chased out of the logging camps by the men themselves. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 5, 1923

Black Diamond was saddened the past week by the accidental deaths of two of the men employed in the mine, Frank Eltz, inside laborer, who met his death on Wednesday, June 27, and Joe Spinks, inside laborer, who followed Eltz over the Divide two days later, Friday, June 29.

Eltz was 37 years of age, born in Austria, March 20, 1886. He came to the United States in 1913, and has been with the Pacific Coast Coal Company since August 1921. He was working in the gangway of the 12th level, north, at 5:30 p.m., when a large piece of rock fell from the roof, killing him instantly. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 3, 1922

The first of 200 homes in which the miners and their families will be housed.

The first of 200 homes in which the miners and their families will be housed.

Labor leaders addressed striking coal miners and their sympathizers at the dedication of the new town of Morganville, thirty-three miles southeast of Seattle yesterday afternoon.

The state district organization of the United Mine Workers of America built or rather is building, Morganville to shelter the striking miners of Black Diamond who sold or surrendered leases on homes on company ground when the open shop was established in that camp last August. The new town stands almost adjoining the old “company” town.

Combined with the dedication of the new “union” town was a deferred celebration of the twenty-fourth anniversary of the establishment by the United Mine Workers in the great bituminous coal fields of the East of the eight-hour day and the joint contract or working agreement system of dealing with their employers. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 2, 1913

Lawless malcontents fire into company hotel and attempt to tear down stockade at open camp

Corporation employee gets bullet in foot

Bayne hotel

Bayne hotel

One non-union employee was shot, a rifle bullet shattering his foot, and an attempt was made to tear down the stockade gate and fence at the open-shop Bayne mine of the Carbon Coal & Clay Company, forty miles southeast of Seattle, last night.

It was the climax to a day of demonstration during which more than 1,000 members of the United Mine Workers of America had assembled outside the stockade to register a protest against the non-union status of the employees on the other side of the fence. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, March 19, 1922

No action taken regarding manner of handling situation if strike comes

umaWith the adjournment taken late yesterday until tomorrow morning, the prospects are that the biennial state district convention of the United Mine Workers, the coal miners’ international union, meeting in Seattle, will remain in session a part, at least, of another week. The convention met last Monday and is holding its sessions at the Labor Temple.

No definite action has been taken so far, it was said, regarding the local handling of the situation that will arise should the threatened nation-wide strike of the coal mine workers come on April 1. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, February 2, 1972

By Don Duncan

Matthew McTurk (left) and Richard H. Parry

Matthew McTurk (left) and Richard H. Parry

Richard H. Parry, stocky Welshman, turned 90 the other day. Parry and Matthew McTurk, 85, a wiry Scot, recalled the days when they almost really owed their souls to the company store.

Not in Appalachia, mind you. But right here in Washington State, where human moles burrowed into the ground at Roslyn, Black Diamond, Ravensdale, Wilkeson and Carbonado and the basement coal bin was as much a part the home as the kitchen icebox.

At times Parry and McTurk disagreed loudly on historical points—“Now you shut up and let me tell it”—but it was all noise and no heat; the disagreement of old, old friends. Afterward they embraced warmly. (more…)

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