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Posts Tagged ‘United Mine Workers of America’

Originally published in the South County Journal, April 25, 2002

Concrete block now encases meeting spot of coal miners’ union

By Mike Archbold
Journal Reporter

Paul Botts, left, 87, one of the last underground miners from Black Diamond, and Don Mason, president of the Black Diamond Historical Society, stand at the Union Stump. Now enclosed in concrete, the old fir stump was used in 1907 in Black Diamond to rally miners and start a union. (Gary Kissel/JournaI)

BLACK DIAMOND — Paul Botts remembers seeing the Union Stump as a youngster.

Now 87, he is among the last of the underground coal miners still living in the area. And Botts still is a member of United Mine Workers Local 6481.

“Dues are $6 a month. And I still get benefits,” Botts said last week, leaning against the large, square block of concrete encasing the old fir stump—where union history was made nearly a century ago, debates were argued, rallies were held, and strikes were called.

Like mining itself, Local 6481 left Black Diamond years ago. Now the local is located in Ogden, Utah, Botts said. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, April 11, 1990

By Linda W.Y. Parrish
Times staff reporter

The sight of dead men being pulled from a mine one by one, was a lasting picture that shaped Cora Ann Flyzik’s life as an activist for miners and women.

Mrs. Flyzik died at the age of 104 last Thursday (April 11) in Seattle from what her daughters describe as simply “old age.”

Mining was always part of Mrs. Flyzik’s life. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 30, 1913

Principal is coming meeting of International at Indianapolis, other that of State Federation of Labor

Delegates selected by referendum vote

Nine of ten or more to go East January 15 already known—smaller unions combine to reduce expenses

By C.J. Stratton

Two big labor conventions in progress at the same time will divide the attention and interest of the union coal miners of the state of Washington next month, and three score or more of the diggers of black diamonds will have the honor of sitting in them as delegates representing the United Mine Workers of America, of which this state forms District No. 10. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, September 10, 1909

The Labor Day celebration at Black Diamond was a notable event, and all the arrangements were carried out in good style. The crowd in attendance was said to be the largest ever seen at the Diamond.

The parade in the morning showed a full turnout of United Mine Workers, and there were three bands in line. Burnett had some sixty men in line, led by the Enumclaw band, and several hundred came from Seattle, Renton, Ravensdale, and Franklin. The Seattle and Black Diamond bands gave excellent music throughout the day.  (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 18, 2014

By Bill Kombol

The United Mine Workers of America (UMWA) were first organized on January 25, 1890. At one time this union was the most powerful in America.

From 1920 through 1960 the UMWA coal miners were led by John L. Lewis, a persuasive labor leader who founded, the Congress of Industrial Organizations, better known as the second half of the acronym AFL-CIO. Coal mine union membership peaked in 1946 at 500,000 but has since dipped to under to under 75,000, only 20,000 of whom are active coal miners. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 24, 1913

Blast in Black Diamond Mine, of unknown origin, kills workman—his fellows in serious condition

Violation of rules suspected as cause: Required precautions observed by Pacific Coast Co., exposed lamp or match thought to blame

The superintendent’s office and the workings of Mine No. 14, circa 1905. This coal mine was located just east of Highway 169 as it starts downhill toward Jones Lake. Lawson Hill and Mine No. 2 are in the background. Photo courtesy of Frank Guidetti.

The superintendent’s office and the workings of Mine No. 14, circa 1905. This coal mine was located just east of Highway 169 as it starts downhill toward Jones Lake. Lawson Hill and Mine No. 2 are in the background. Photo courtesy of Frank Guidetti.

Jack Jackson was killed and Ned Rossi and Eugene Pelline, miners, were seriously burned in an explosion this morning on the tenth level of No. 14 mine at Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 9, 1914

Pete Frederickson, Black Diamond butcher, won the prize for the most handsomely decorated auto.

Pete Frederickson, Black Diamond butcher, won the prize for the most handsomely decorated auto.

That the team entered by the local miners’ union was victorious in the mine rescue and first aid meet held in Black Diamond on Labor Day, defeating the fire bosses’ team organized by the mine operators, is the report to Seattle by William Short, state district secretary of the United Mine Workers, who served as master of ceremonies at Black Diamond’s celebration of the holiday. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, September 2, 1958

A plaque was placed on a cement-encased stump in a field near Black Diamond yesterday, commemorating it as the rallying point where 200 miners met May 15, 1907, and organized Local 2257, United Mine Workers of America. Albert Donati, president of Local 6487, placed the plaque. Standing on the stump were, from left, Fred Roberts, Sam Nicholls, and William C. Lewis. Roberts and Lewis signed their names to the charter on the stump the day the local was founded. Nicholls is president of District 10, United Mine Workers.

A plaque was placed on a cement-encased stump in a field near Black Diamond yesterday, commemorating it as the rallying point where 200 miners met May 15, 1907, and organized Local 2257, United Mine Workers of America. Albert Donati, president of Local 6487, placed the plaque. Standing on the stump were, from left, Fred Roberts, Sam Nicholls, and William C. Lewis. Roberts and Lewis signed their names to the charter on the stump the day the local was founded. Nicholls is president of District 10, United Mine Workers.

A decaying tree stump in a field near Black Diamond was the rallying point for miners of the area yesterday during the annual Labor Day celebration.

The old stump, now encased in cement, was the spot where 200 miners met on May 15, 1907, to organize Local 2257, United Mine Workers of America. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 1, 1913

BLACK DIAMOND, Wash., Monday, Sept. 1. – Miners from Renton, Carbonado, Wilkeson, Ravensdale, Taylor, and Newcastle are here today to help the local union of the United Mine Workers of America observe Labor Day. The day’s program opened this morning with a parade of 2,500 miners led by a band from Carbonado.

Following the parade the crowd went to the baseball park, where representative of the miners’ organization addressed the gathering. William Short acted as chairman and speeches were made by Martin Flyzik, vice-president of the district, and Frank Farrington, international representative of the mine workers’ organization.

Original plans for the speakers included an I.W.W. from Seattle, but members of the local who learned of the plan prevailed on the committee to cancel the engagement.

Races and a baseball game between Black Diamond and Taylor were held this afternoon.

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 27, 1913

BLACK DIAMOND, Wednesday, August 27. – As prophesied yesterday, the strike of the United Mine Workers of America that has been on here for the last two and one-half weeks, came to a close this morning when the 750 men who went out returned to work.

The miners have called off the strike with the provision that should the national board approve their action of August 10, they will go out again, but it is thought by mine officials that the difficulty is over.

George Ayers, over whose discharge the suspension of work order is issued, did not return to work, and according to the mine officials, he will not do so, regardless of the action of the national board.

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