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Posts Tagged ‘United Mine Workers of America’

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 15, 1920

Washington mines boost prices to care for higher wages granted to miners recently

Following ratification last week by the mine workers’ state convention held in Seattle of the new working agreement between the Coal Operators’ Association and State District No. 10 of the United Mine Workers of America giving a general increase in wages, west side coal operators announced an upward revision of bunker prices for coal, which is now being passed on to consumers by Seattle retail fuel dealers.

Fifty cents a ton is the advance made on the grades of stove and range coal most used by Seattle householders, including the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s Newcastle and Issaquah lump-nut, which are classed as lignites. The bunker price of these lignites is now $8.50. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 11, 1913

Men employed in collieries of Pacific Coast Company quit in sympathy with discharged committeeman

Organization growing about Black Diamond

Seven hundred miners employed in the three collieries of the Pacific Coast Company at Black Diamond walked out this morning because the company had refused to reinstate George Ayers, a member of the “pit committee,” reputed to be an I.W.W. organizer in the Black Diamond district.

Ayers was discharged following a quarrel with a subforman named Mitchell, with whom he had taken up a grievance of a miner who had not been supplied with a “bucker.” Ayers is said to have become abusive when Mitchell told him that he had no authority to regulate employment. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 3, 1913

iwwMembers of the United Mine Workers of America, having unionized practically all the collieries in this state, may have to clash with the I.W.W. [Industrial Workers of the World] to retain control of the west side camps.

According to mine employees and operators the I.W.W. is attempting to force its way into the mining camps, but thus far has made no marked headway. The union officials believe that the I.W.W. will be no more popular in the mining camps than it has been among loggers, and during the past year I.W.W. organizers have been chased out of the logging camps by the men themselves. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 27, 1919

The fourth annual statewide mine rescue and first aid meet, to be held under the joint auspices of the United States Bureau of Mines, the state mine inspection department, the Washington Coal Operators’ Association, and District No. 10 of the United Mine Workers of America, will be staged at Black Diamond on Saturday, August 9, according to an announcement made by the executive committee in charge of arrangements. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 20, 1918

Presentation to the town of Black Diamond of the honor flag it won by subscribing more than fifteen times its quota in the recent Third Liberty Loan Drive, and the formation of state organization Slavs and Americans of Slavish descent, were celebrated at a patriotic mass meeting of nearly a thousand citizens of the big coal camp and the surrounding villages yesterday. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 11, 1915

Union workers of state regard as climax of depression suspension of operations in Franklin property

By C.J. Stratton

Long-continued depression in Washington’s coal mining industry and consequent precarious employment for the union miners of the state reached what the mine workers regard as a climax last week when the famous Franklin mine, one of the oldest and largest in King County, was shut down, possibly never to reopen.

The increasing use of California oil as fuel by steamships and power plants and the growing use of gas as a domestic fuel, combined with increasing operating expenses, due to the depth of the workings, are said to have been the principal causes of the shutdown. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 3, 1922

The first of 200 homes in which the miners and their families will be housed.

The first of 200 homes in which the miners and their families will be housed.

Labor leaders addressed striking coal miners and their sympathizers at the dedication of the new town of Morganville, thirty-three miles southeast of Seattle yesterday afternoon.

The state district organization of the United Mine Workers of America built or rather is building, Morganville to shelter the striking miners of Black Diamond who sold or surrendered leases on homes on company ground when the open shop was established in that camp last August. The new town stands almost adjoining the old “company” town.

Combined with the dedication of the new “union” town was a deferred celebration of the twenty-fourth anniversary of the establishment by the United Mine Workers in the great bituminous coal fields of the East of the eight-hour day and the joint contract or working agreement system of dealing with their employers. (more…)

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