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Posts Tagged ‘University of Washington’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, February 25, 1923

Medical, military, and industrial units show efficiency in operation

Thrilling rescues and efficient first aid work were demonstrated at The Armory last night, with the Washington National Guard and the King County Medical Society as hosts. 1—Boy Scouts show how to make a stretcher. Left to right, Glen Peterson, Troop 40; Carrol Philips, Troop 41; William Bliss, Troop 40 (on stretcher); Earl Deaner, Troop 40. 2—Maj. George W. Becler examining a trophy. 3—CoIumbus Hospital team, left to right. Miss E. Cassinat. Dr. William C. Speidel, Miss E. Hoover, Mrs. H.H. Ross, Miss K. Bates, Miss P. Campbell. 4—Lieut. Col. Harry Vanderbilt Wurdemann, chief umpire. 5—Lieut. Joseph Salvage, Seattle Fire Department, thinks life-saving is entertaining. The victim is Fireman T. Harden.

Thrilling rescues and efficient first aid work were demonstrated at The Armory last night, with the Washington National Guard and the King County Medical Society as hosts. 1—Boy Scouts show how to make a stretcher. Left to right, Glen Peterson, Troop 40; Carrol Philips, Troop 41; William Bliss, Troop 40 (on stretcher); Earl Deaner, Troop 40. 2—Maj. George W. Beeler examining a trophy. 3—Columbus Hospital team, left to right. Miss E. Cassinat. Dr. William C. Speidel, Miss E. Hoover, Mrs. H.H. Ross, Miss K. Bates, Miss P. Campbell. 4—Lieut. Col. Harry Vanderbilt Wurdemann, chief umpire. 5—Lieut. Joseph Salvage, Seattle Fire Department, thinks life-saving is entertaining. The victim is Fireman T. Harden.

Helmets, miners’ lamps, campaign hats, and nurses’ caps bobbed about in the Armory last night when an interesting exhibit of rescue work and first aid was staged by teams representing medical, military, and industrial organizations. The affair was arranged jointly by the King County Medical Society and the Washington National Guard. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 12, 1992

By Heather Larson

More than 75 people turned out at a meeting here on Aug. 4 to show support for the new county being formed, dubbed Cedar County. Residents from Maple Valley, Duvall, and North Bend, all of which will be contained within the borders of Cedar County, turned out for the kickoff meeting last week. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 25, 1924

Though it may have been considered futile and useless to talk of shipping coal to Newcastle—we mean the Newcastle of Merrie England—it is an accomplished fact that the Pacific Coast Coal Company ships coal to Vancouver, British Columbia.

Evidence of this is seen in the two scows here shown loading at the Pacific Coast Coal Company bunkers. Each scow takes approximately 475 tons of Newcastle buckwheat coal, which is then towed to Vancouver for delivery to the British Columbia Sugar Refinery.

Approximately sixteen hours is required to tow the loaded scows to their destination. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, Summer 2018

By William Kombol

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

This spring photographer Bob Dobson stumbled upon a short section of railroad hidden amongst a dense forest near Lake Sawyer. He took a photo that inspired a question: “Who laid these rusty rails?”

Little did he know the answer is the story behind the men who founded Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 26, 1966

The mountain of coal outside the Rogers No. 3 shaft of the Palmer Coking Coal Co. operation near Black Diamond shows the extent of coal-mining activity that is still being carried on in King County.

The mountain of coal outside the Rogers No. 3 shaft of the Palmer Coking Coal Co. operation near Black Diamond shows the extent of coal-mining activity that is still being carried on in King County.

At one time, coal mining was a big operation in the Puget Sound area. Before the turn of the century, the black gold was being dug from foothill sites such as Carbonado and Black Diamond, Newcastle and Franklin, Renton and Ravensdale, Coal Creek and Issaquah. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 19, 1974

The Lake Heights community includes Lake Morton.

The Lake Heights community includes Lake Morton.

A new community is springing to life in the Lake Morton area south of Black Diamond and enthusiasm among its backers is increasing by the day, all reports seem to indicate.

The 28-square-mile area encompassed by the community of Lake Heights extends roughly from Horseshoe Lake and the county’s Lake Sawyer Park on the north, Highway 18 on the south, 164th Place S.E. on the west, and the Green River on the east. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, April 26, 1989

Homes and revenue for the City of Black Diamond could be on the way again, because the Black Diamond Lake annexation that was killed in September may see new life.

Majority property owner John Walker, on a recent visit from Florida, said he and the City of Black Diamond are in the “conversation stages” of a possible proposal. (more…)

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