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Posts Tagged ‘University of Washington’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 23, 1911

Government demonstration coach on way to Sound to pass three days more

Mine rescue car in Black Diamond.

Government Mine Rescue Car No. 5 will arrive in Seattle May 1 and will be at the fire station of the University of Washington for three days, according to an announcement made yesterday by the mine bureau officials in charge of the car.

The car and its crew are now at Bayne. April 28 it will be at Ravensdale, and from there will proceed to Tacoma. Other dates for the car follow:

Renton, May 5; Issaquah, May 6; Newcastle, May 8; Taylor, May 9; Black Diamond and Franklin, May 12 to 14.

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 1, 1926

Black Diamond has always maintained a reputation for turning out championship teams in baseball, but in the season which just closed, the camp held the distinction of honoring two soccer football teams, both of whom made splendid records.

In the group shown above are gathered the following players: Front row, left to right, “Chick” Thompson, Chas. “Red” Towers, A. Maroni, R. Durnac, John Ogden; second row, Chas. Maroni, Jas. Strang, Vic Roberts; back row, P.J. Gallagher, J.T. Hollow, and “Boots” Pierotti. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 18, 1926

Though the men who dig the coal seldom see it after it leaves the mine, they know that the product of their labor will go to warm the homes of many cities and towns. This picture shows one of the Ford delivery trucks of the Pacific Coast Coal Company from which is being delivered a load of Newcastle Lump. This truck is designed for quick and light deliveries and is able to haul its load anywhere that a car can be driven. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, March 15, 1989

If all goes as planned, the citizens of Black Diamond and surrounding areas will able to walk and jog along a two-mile trail south of the city.

Eleven members of the city’s newly formed 23-member Comprehensive Plan Advisory Committee and Planning Commission met Wednesday evening to discuss future parks and recreation options for Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, March 7, 1984

Coal mining plan faces opposition

By Louis T. Corsaletti
Times suburban reporter

Bill Kombol, manager of Palmer Coking Coal Co. in Black Diamond, stands amid a stand of Douglas fir trees on reclaimed land that was part of the McKay Surface Mine in 1974-1976. The pit mine was dug as deep as 40 feet in some places to reach coal. Richard S. Hevza/Seattle Times

Douglas firs ranging from a foot to 10 feet high grow branchtip to branchtip along two narrow strips of generally clear land near Black Diamond.

A few short years ago these same corridors, hewn out of second- and third-growth forest, were sliced open to extract black diamonds—coal. The open ugly sores were the Palmer Coking Coal Company’s McKay and Gem Surface Mines. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 4, 1926

Editors and publishers of approximately 100 newspapers in the State of Washington were the guests of the Pacific Coast Coal Company at Newcastle and the Briquet Plant, last Saturday. This excursion was the closing feature of the Fourteenth Annual Newspaper Institute of the Washington Press Association.

The picture shows the group ready to board the special train after having made a trip into the Primrose Seam, a mile and a quarter into the heart of the mountain, from whence comes the famous Newcastle coal. (more…)

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Originally published in The Tacoma News Tribune, February 19, 1998

Bill would give Black Diamond permit it has been denied 3 times

By Leslie Brown
The News Tribune

Black Diamond development: Black Diamond Associates’ 1,600-home development would sit on 750 acres recently annexed by the city. The project is on hold because the city doesn’t have enough water. (Ronnie Ashlock/The News Tribune)

After failing at every level to obtain a water permit for 1,600 new homes in Black Diamond, developers finally have found a sympathetic and powerful ear in the Legislature.

A bill that would give the City of Black Diamond a “temporary” water permit—the very one the state Ecology Department denied developers three years ago passed the House 55-42 last week. It is now pending before the Senate.

Critics are decrying House Bill 2800, sponsored by Rep. Jack Cairnes (R-Covington) as special-interest legislation, bad water policy, and an end-run around a three-tiered administrative process that gave the developers ample review.

“This bill is not really intended to secure a (water) supply for the existing population of the area,” Ecology Department water resources manager Keith Phillips wrote to the House Agriculture and Ecology Committee. “Rather, it is intended to secure a supply for a large, new land development nearby.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 11, 1926

Two monster Diamond Briquets, each weighing more than 200 pounds, proved a great drawing card in the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s booth at the Southwest Washington Manufacturers’ Exposition held in Tacoma last week.

A guessing contest was held, a ton of Diamond Briquets being the prize for the person guessing closest to the actual weight of the monster briquet shown on the mantlepiece. More than 3,000 guesses were recorded. J.F. Torrence is the manager of the Tacoma agency of the Pacific Coast Coal Company. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 4, 1926

Every day from 450 to 500 tons of Diamond Briquets are loaded into railroad cars for shipment to almost every point where fuel is used between Canada and Mexico on the Pacific Coast. This scene shows how the briquets are lowered from the cooling conveyor into the cars. Thousands of tons of Diamond Briquets will soon be distributed throughout the orchards of Eastern Washington, where they will be burned to protect the fruit blossoms from the ravages of frost this spring. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 28, 1926

New Black Diamond Mine was visited by the representatives of the Sales Department as a part of the two-day program last week. In the mine the salesmen saw visual evidence of the company’s confidence in the future of the coal industry. The picture of the group was taken at the face of the gangway after they had walked in from the main entrance. (more…)

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