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Posts Tagged ‘Van Asselt’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 7, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

Of all the “lost” towns of King County the mostly thoroughly obliterated probably is Taylor, seven miles east of Maple Valley.

Taylor, once with a population close to 700 persons, was swallowed by the Cedar River watershed. Today a young forest is springing from its streets and gardens, and the sites of the coal bunkers and kilns of its once-prosperous clay industry.

Taylor ceased to exist in 1947. Two years earlier, the Seattle Water Department had obtained a condemnation judgment permitting it to include the town in the watershed. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, December 2000

By Barbara Nilson • Photos by Sherrie Acker

Bill and Irene (Maes) Bogh, Tahoma class Taylor class of 1939, at the Taylor program.

Bill and Irene (Maes) Bogh, Tahoma class Taylor class of 1939, at the Taylor program.

Taylor as a company town was discussed at the reunion Oct. 17. Dale Sandhei said he thought they had it better than a lot of people at that time—they had a sewer system, pumped in water, electricity, and the coal was delivered to their homes.

The company was very benevolent; they built a swimming pool and cleaned it out once a year. (more…)

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Prepared for the membership of the PNR-NMRA, September 13, 1958

By H.A. Durfy

Coal—black diamonds—a source of heat, light, power, medicines, and many more products too numerous to mention here. This was the beginning of the Pacific Coast R.R. Co., upon which you are riding today. Of course, like other railroads, the Pacific Coast R.R. Co. was not always known by the present title, and we want to lead you through the background and the beginnings of the railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in Seattle Daily Times, January 7, 1906

Former manager of Denny-Renton Clay & Coal Co. decides to take long rest after many years in business

George W. Kummer

George W. Kummer

George W. Kummer, who recently resigned the general managership of the Denny-Renton Clay & Coal Company, was the pioneer, organizer, and manager of the first developed factory for the manufacture of clay products in Seattle. To this work he gave sixteen years of unremitting effort, with the result that this industry is now one of the largest and most prosperous in this part of the country.

In 1890 Mr. Kummer took charge of the Puget Sound Fire Clay Company, which, under his management, made the first pressed brick and the first fire brick manufactured in Seattle. This company was reorganized in 1892 under the name of the Denny Clay Company, and during the past year a further reorganization was effected by the absorption of the Renton Clay and Coal Company, the new corporation becoming the Denny-Renton Clay and Coal Company. (more…)

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Entire valley under water and the junction shut off from outside communication

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, January 5, 1903

The Denny-Renton Clay Co.’s first factory was located at Van Asselt, located near today’s Boeing Field. It was named for Henry Van Asselt (pictured), one of the county’s first pioneers. To learn more about Henry Van Asselt, read this article from the <a href="http://sococulture.org/duwamish-pioneer-served-civil-war-militia/" target="_blank">South King County Cultural Coalition</a>.

The Denny-Renton Clay Co.’s first factory was located at Van Asselt, located near today’s Boeing Field. It was named for Henry Van Asselt, one of the county’s first pioneers. To learn more about Henry Van Asselt, read this article from the South King County Cultural Coalition.

BLACK RIVER, Monday, Jan. 5—The entire valley is practically under water. The river is higher than ever known before. Late last evening water raised until the Columbia & Puget Sound track was flooded and washed out for a quarter of a mile. Great damage was done the Northern Pacific double track between here and Argo. Two bridges and many culverts are gone and railway traffic is entirely suspended. There is a great loss of livestock reported. No human lives have been lost.

The river reached its height about midnight and is now falling. The highway between here and Orillia is impassible except by boat. The interurban railway is practically all gone between Kent and Van Asselt. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 27, 1964

By Lucile McDonald

This is the farm near Hobart where Bill Peacock spent his boyhood. The farm now belongs to his nephew. A rail line once ran through pasture in foreground.

This is the farm near Hobart where Bill Peacock spent his boyhood. The farm now belongs to his nephew. A rail line once ran through pasture in foreground.

From high places around Hobart, where Bill Peacock has spent 77 of his nearly 80 years, he can view the new sweep of the Echo Lake cutoff highway and automobiles traveling along it at a fast clip.

The final section penetrates foothill country that not too long ago had only roads made with pick, shovel and wheelbarrow.

Peacock used to travel a long circuit over them once a week making meat deliveries. He believes he was the first person to drive a team and wagon into some of the communities along the Pacific Coast Railroad. The branch line later was torn up and the towns are now defunct. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, December 7, 1980

Johnny Pritchard with an ore car at the Denny-Renton Clay Company pit on the banks of the Green River about 1900.

Johnny Pritchard with an ore car at the Denny-Renton Clay Company pit on the banks of the Green River about 1900.

By James Warren

At one time, King County was the world’s largest producer of paving brick. In fact, clay products from King County have long been world-famous.

It all began in 1889 when Arthur Denny, one of Seattle’s founders, incorporated the Denny Clay Company and began using shale clay from the banks of the Duwamish River. His timing was fortuitous for that was the year Seattle’s business district burned to the ground. The city fathers promptly decreed that henceforth all downtown buildings must be built of non-combustible materials.

Denny’s factory was located at Van Asselt, then a southern suburb named for Henry Van Asselt, another famous Seattle pioneer. Business boomed and in 1893 the Denny Company expanded by absorbing the Puget Sound Fire Clay Company and building a new plant in the town of Taylor about 10 miles east of Maple Valley. (more…)

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