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Posts Tagged ‘Voice of the Valley’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 21, 1978

One of Maple Valley’s first stores, once well-stocked and standing where the Maple Valley Food Center is now located, still is used for storage as it rests in a pasture at the dead end of S.E. 216th Place. Built about 1896, it is probably the oldest commercial building remaining in Maple Valley. —Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.

One of Maple Valley’s first stores, once well-stocked and standing where the Maple Valley Food Center is now located, still is used for storage as it rests in a pasture at the dead end of S.E. 216th Place. Built about 1896, it is probably the oldest commercial building remaining in Maple Valley. —Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.

Maple Valley’s first store sits proudly in a pasture at the dead end of S.E. 216th Place and it is almost unnoticed.

Built about 1896, owned and run successively by William D. Gibbon and Joe Mezzavilla, it is probably the oldest commercial building remaining in Maple Valley.

According to Jayne Wissel, King County historic site researcher, there are many unique structures of local historical significance in the Maple Valley area such as the Scholtman house, the Lagesson cabin, and the Hobart school buildings.

Local citizens and members of the Maple Valley Historical Society have aided in the locating and historical research of these sites. Some information has been gathered on many more sites. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 23, 2016

By Bill Kombol

Maple Valley’s third depot dates to 1953, shortly after it was built.

Maple Valley’s third depot dates to 1953, shortly after it was built.

Over the near century from 1885 to 1982, Maple Valley hosted three different railroad stations, all located in old Maple Valley just north of where Highway 18 overpasses SR-169. This photo of the third Maple Valley depot dates to 1953 shortly after it was built.

The Maple Valley station was an important cog for directing rail traffic as trains could be switched to Black Diamond, Taylor, or up the Cedar River through Landsburg into the watershed. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 26, 2016

By Bill Kombol

The old callboard of the C&PS can be seen slightly above the new board installed in the PCRR terminals at South Alaskan Way near Dearborn on the Seattle waterfront – just west of CenturyLink stadium.

The old callboard of the C&PS can be seen slightly above the new board installed in the PCRR terminals at South Alaskan Way near Dearborn on the Seattle waterfront – just west of CenturyLink stadium.

This is the second of a series, which details the workings of the Pacific Coast Railroad (PCRR) late in its corporate life. Founding as the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad (C&PS), from the ashes of the Seattle & Walla Walla, PCRR was profiled in a 1948 Rotogravure magazine, which included this photo of the engine dispatcher’s board. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 19, 2016

By Bill Kombol

This January 20, 1948 photo shows a PCRR engine pulling loaded coal cars as they cross over the Cedar River near Maplewood Golf Course in Renton.

This January 20, 1948, photo shows a PCRR engine pulling loaded coal cars as they cross over the Cedar River near Maplewood Golf Course in Renton.

This column’s focus over the next several weeks will be the Pacific Coast Railroad (PCRR), previously known as the Columbia & Puget Sound (C&PS). Perhaps no other single venture was more important to the development of the Maple Valley–Black Diamond area than the railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 4, 1977

(Boat race preview—3rd in a series)

Freedom’s the name of this craft which—at last report—will be one of the entries in the Cedar River Boat Race on June 4. It will be manned by Ron Ralstad and Mike Melton.

Freedom’s the name of this craft which—at last report—will be one of the entries in the Cedar River Boat Race on June 4. It will be manned by Ron Ralstad and Mike Melton.

With the June 4th Cedar River races edging closer by the day, the Voice will have to double up on the boats if it intends to finish its preview. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 23 and 30, 1975

By Laura Lorenz

Modern-day fireman George Raffle, shown above with the moving stock of the Maple Valley Fire Department (King County District 43), is understandably proud of today’s fire station and its equipment. It all started back in 1950 when three citizens went together to sign a $500 note. (Voice photo by Kevin McLellan)

Modern-day fireman George Raffle, shown above with the moving stock of the Maple Valley Fire Department (King County District 43), is understandably proud of today’s fire station and its equipment. It all started back in 1950 when three citizens went together to sign a $500 note. (Voice photo by Kevin McLellan)

The Maple Valley Fire Department grew from a dream to actuality in the spring of 1950 when a $500 note was signed by Joe Mezzavilla, Bill Mitchell, and Frank Sayers to obtain a 1926 Howard Cooper fire engine truck from the city of Blaine, Washington. The remaining one-half of the truck’s cost was gathered by numerous citizens’ donations. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 30, 1975

By Laura Lorenz

Dynamiting shut the portal of Rogers No. 3 coal mine, closing last underground mine in Washington, Ravensdale, 2:30 p.m., December 17, 1975 Photo by Carl G. Falk, Courtesy Palmer Coking Coal Company

Dynamiting shut the portal of Rogers No. 3 coal mine, closing last underground mine in Washington, Ravensdale, 2:30 p.m., December 17, 1975 Photo by Carl G. Falk, Courtesy Palmer Coking Coal Company

Rogers Number 3, the last of the state’s underground coal mines, will stop mining within the next few weeks. A retirement party of eats and dancing last Saturday marked a reduction of almost half of the twenty-man crew.

Carl Falk, office manager for Palmer Coking Coal Company Inc., claims the Ravensdale mine closure is due to economics. Too few contracts and the expense of complying with present day health and safety regulations for such a small operation tipped the scales. The mine puts out only about 20,000 tons of coal annually.

Falk said the retirement of mining operations was determined some years ago as contracts to state institutions declined. One after another have converted to natural gas, using oil as a standby fuel instead of coal. Only three state institutions contract for coal: Monroe State Reformatory, Shelton Correction Center, and the Orting Old Soldiers Home.

“There will be enough coal mined,” said Falk, “to complete contract commitments. The company will continue to market coal for another heating year.” Coal retails at $30.00 a ton on a U-haul basis. (more…)

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