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Posts Tagged ‘Voice of the Valley’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 18, 1979

By Teresa Hensley

Circled above is the low area in the right abutment of the masonry dam.

Circled above is the low area in the right abutment of the masonry dam.

“There is no imminent danger, and people should not be alarmed,” said Colonel John A. Poteat, the Army Corps Seattle District Engineer, in a press release last week from Seattle City Light about the masonry dam above the Cedar River.

In an earlier press conference it was revealed that the dam could prove unsafe in the event of a major flood.

Conditions which could trigger such an emergency—described as “a flood on top of a flood” by Joe Recchi, acting superintendent of City Light—have never been approached in the 75 years of the project. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, April 15, 1992

Black Diamond’s new waste-water flushing tank is near the entrance to the city cemetery and is constructed of concrete. (Photo by Brenda Berube.)

Black Diamond’s new waste-water flushing tank is near the entrance to the city cemetery and is constructed of concrete. (Photo by Brenda Berube.)

It’s not pretty, but it’s functional.

At least that’s what Bill Lee, Black Diamond’s waste water project construction manager and city consultant, says of the city’s flushing tank recently erected at the Black Diamond Cemetery.

When operational, the concrete box will provide 20,000 gallons of water to flush a siphon in the waste water system along Roberts Drive.

According to Lee, there’s a drop in the pipe at Roberts Drive, and waste water has to go up a 24-foot hill before it flows out of the city. The flushing tank will send a rush of water through the system, pushing stray solids through the system.

The building is a tall, square concrete box at the entrance of the cemetery.

“Of all the options we looked at,” Lee said, “this was the least obnoxious.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 11, 1979

Wall-raising day for the new Coast-to-Coast Hardware store at Four Corners.

Wall-raising day for the new Coast-to-Coast Hardware store at Four Corners.

It was “Wall Raising Day” at Four Corners on April 2 for the Coast-to-Coast Hardware store which will move from Wilderness Village to its new site this coming June.

Huge tilt-up panels of reinforced concrete were lifted into place by the crane operator and secured by a half dozen other skilled workmen within 6 ½ hours. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 7, 1999

By Barbara Nilson

The Gibbon/Mezzavilla store now sits at its new home on the historical society site off of Witte Road. Work parties will begin this summer to bring new life into the historic building. – Photo by Barbara Nilson.

The Gibbon/Mezzavilla store now sits at its new home on the historical society site off of Witte Road. Work parties will begin this summer to bring new life into the historic building. – Photo by Barbara Nilson.

Cameras flashed in the snowy darkness of March 28 as the historic Gibbon/Mezzavilla store was pulled from its meadow resting place to breathe new life as a Maple Valley Historical Society project.

As it was towed past its second home site at 2 a.m. at the corner of the Maple Valley Highway and S.E. 216th Way, cameras tried to record the historic moment. Manning some of the cameras were Gary Gibbon and his son Lance, descendants of the store’s original owner, William Gibbon. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 7, 2015

By Bill Kombol

Railroads played a key role in the development of most King County towns, including Ravensdale. The arrival of the nation’s second transcontinental railway, the Northern Pacific (NP) in 1883 dramatically accelerated growth throughout the Washington Territory.

The development of a production-scale coal mine required a rail link to deliver the massive equipment needed to operate the mine and to transport the coal to market.

The extension of the Columbia and Puget Sound (C&PS) railway in 1884 from Renton by Henry Villard’s Oregon Improvement Company enabled the coal mines at Cedar Mountain (1884), Black Diamond (late 1884), Franklin (1885), and Danville (1896) to begin production. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 5, 1989

Groundbreakers were Ann Trullinger, project manager; Rosemary Konoske, branch manager; Rich Martindale, bank president; Philip E. Biege, chairman of the board; Rudy Petchnick, preliminary site work; Rick Driftmier, architect; and bulldozer operator Rick Fardig. (Photo by Doug Williams.)

Groundbreakers were Ann Trullinger, project manager; Rosemary Konoske, branch manager; Rich Martindale, bank president; Philip E. Biege, chairman of the board; Rudy Petchnick, preliminary site work; Rick Driftmier, architect; and bulldozer operator Rick Fardig. (Photo by Doug Williams.)

Ground was broken last week on the 1.3 acre site of the First National Bank of Enumclaw’s new branch at Four Corners. The site is on the south side of Kent-Kangley Road near the road’s intersection with Highway 169, across the highway from the bank’s existing branch. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 4, 1979

In projecting Maple Valley’s population growth in the next decade, writer Ed Zapel believes it convenient to divide the area into three sub-areas as shown above. By the year 2000, there will be mind-boggling changes in each of these sections.

In projecting Maple Valley’s population growth in the next decade, writer Ed Zapel believes it convenient to divide the area into three sub-areas as shown above. By the year 2000, there will be mind-boggling changes in each of these sections.

Some preliminary work has been completed in outlining safety improvements for the S.E. 216th intersection in Maple Valley, Jerry D. Zirkle, district administrator for the State Department of Transportation, told Doreen Hunt, secretary of the Greater Maple Valley Chamber of Commerce, this week.

Intentions, based on interviews not yet completed with business persons in the vicinity of the intersection, include a left-turn lane providing access to 216th from SR 169.

“Additional clarity would be provided with curbs to identify access locations to the adjacent businesses,” Zirkle said.

“Throughout the area,” he added, “new striping and pavement marking buttons will identify the lane lines. Additional sight distance will be furnished by removing a portion of the high bridge rail as well as removing brush which obstructs the view. After this work is completed this summer we will again conduct a speed study and consider reducing the speed from its present level on SR 169.” (more…)

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