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Posts Tagged ‘Voice of the Valley’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 2, 2003

By Kathleen E. Kear

Black Diamond Firefighters back on home turf following the Firefighter Challenge in Seattle. L-R Mike Hughes, Adam Craig, Hannah Dummer, Josh Farris, John McDougall.

Anyone who has donned full firefighter bunker gear can relate to how hot and heavy that gear can become just moving around on a level surface. Add to that climbing sixty-nine floors as quickly as you can and you have quite the challenge.

Taking on the task of climbing Seattle’s Bank of America’s (Columbia Tower) 1,311 stairs up 69 floors for the first time on Sunday, March 16, were Black Diamond firefighters Josh Farris, John McDougall, Mike Hughes, Thomas Gwin, Hannah Dummer, and Adam Craig. Full bunker gear for each of the participants included boots, gloves, jacket, pants, helmet, mask, and air pack (SCBA). (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 27, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The families of Hobart pioneers, Rudolph and Julie (Gradishnick) Grady and Olga (Grady) and Rudy Petchnick, will be featured at the Sunday, April 15th reunion at the Hobart Community Church, at 1:30 p.m. The program is sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 25, 1998

By Cecilia Nguyen

Officer Jamey Meador was introduced during the March 19 council sessions as the newest member of the Black Diamond Police Department.

Meador is the city’s first full-time female officer. “The goal of our department is to represent the community,” said Rick Luther, police chief.

Officer Meador graduated from Western Washington University with a criminal justice degree and went on to graduate at the top 15% at the police academy. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 20, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

Pacific Coast Coal Co. morning shift poses sitting on electric engines and empty coal cars outside the boarding house in Rainbow Town. The coal bunkers are in the background with the small hose-coal bunker to the right of the rear of the line of coal cars. A track straightener is in the foreground. — 1909 Asahel Curtis photo, courtesy of the Washington State Historical Society, Tacoma, and Bill Kombol, Palmer Coking Coal Co.

Milt Swanson is a historical treasure. He is a walking, talking encyclopedia with fascinating tales of his home town Newcastle/Coal Creek. He’s lived on the same piece of property for 84 years in a company house, on top of a mine shaft and next to the former company hotel and saloon. Across the street was Finn Town and the up the hill was Red Town.

He said when he was a kid, his pals and him named the various areas of the mining camp. The houses on the hill were red, so that was “Red Town”; closer to him the houses were white so naturally that was “White Town” and the area with all different colors was “Rainbow Village.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 15, 2000

By Cecilia Nguyen

For years Black Diamond has struggled to develop a plan that would make the city economically self-sufficient while maintaining the small town character.

A strong local economy with a healthy tax base would provide Black Diamond the much-needed funds to improve its capital facilities.

Financial relief for the small, former mining town may soon be a reality. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 14, 1984

By Eulalia Tollefson

Hundreds of area citizens, in an eleventh hour move, rallied around Pacific Coast Coal Company last week in support of the proposed John Henry No. 1 mine.

The John Henry is a surface mining proposal that would allow for removal of about 1,100 tons of coal from the earth daily on 516 acres of Pacific Coast owned land in south King County.

It is bounded on the southeast by the Green River Gorge Road and by 270th Ave. S.E. on the east side. About 100 acres lie within incorporated Black Diamond city limits. The remainder is in adjacent King County. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 6, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The original depot at Kanaskat built in 1912 and destroyed by fire in 1943. — From the Museum of History and Industry and loaned by Ruth Eckes.

The old railroad towns of Palmer and Kanaskat once thrived across the Green River from each other, Palmer on the north and Kanaskat on the south; eight miles southeast of Enumclaw. Somewhere along the line the two lost their identities. Apparently, the post office located in Palmer burned and the authorities moved it to Kanaskat but left the name of Palmer. (more…)

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