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Posts Tagged ‘Voice of the Valley’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 3, 2007

By Kathleen Kear

Ivan Gingrich, left, shares a laugh with Bill VanRuff, Bob Schuler, Bill Woodcock, and Jeff Snelling in celebration of the completion of refurbishment of the Black Diamond gymnasium. Gingrich and Schuler, who work for Tahoma School District’s maintenance department, volunteered to refinish the gym floor on their own time. VanRuff, Woodcock, and Snelling are members of Maple Valley Rotary, which donated labor and money to refurbish the gym.

Kids in the City of Black Diamond were so excited about their gym’s reopening, which had been a work in progress since being moved from the Black Diamond Elementary School in 1992, that they hopped on their bikes and made their way to the gym long before the celebration was set to begin on Saturday, June 23. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 2, 2003

By Kathleen E. Kear

Could this Black Diamond field become the site for a new King County Library?

Several months ago, the Black Diamond City Council held a public hearing on a request for a conditional site use permit for the King County Library System.

At that time, the library district was developing plans for a new library with parking and landscape improvements on a site on Jones Lake Road. Black Diamond City Council granted the request with special conditions. However, KCLS withdrew the application after citizens expressed concern about the site. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 26, 1985

By Eulalia Tollefson

Map-gazing may not be a popular sport but it can reveal the darndest things, as Chris Ellingson of Black Diamond discovered recently.

While looking at a map of Alberta, Canada, Ellingson chanced upon a town named, coincidently, Black Diamond.

Imbued with a natural curiosity, Ellingson determined to learn something about the Canadian town that bears the name of her city. Because she is a firefighter in the Black Diamond—Washington, that is—Fire Department, and knowing nowhere else to begin, Ellingson called the Black Diamond, Alberta—fire department and exchanged pleasantries with Fire Chief Tom Gillis. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 23, 2015

By Kathleen Kear

Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) presented long-time Black Diamond resident Gomer Evans with a national Distinguished Citizen Medal.

Making his way to the Black Diamond Library with his daughter Sherrie Evans, who wanted to pick up a library book, Gomer Evans, long-time Black Diamond community member, was quite surprised to see a room full of friends shouting, “Surprise!”—when he entered.

Evans was doubly surprised when he learned during a short ceremony presented by Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) local Chapter Regent Jeannette Carroll, on Saturday, April 25, that he had been chosen for a national Distinguished Citizen Medal from DAR Nominations for the medal begin at the organization’s chapter level and make their way to the national level where they are scrutinized by the DAR National Society in Washington D.C. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 23, 2009

By Kathleen Kear

It was a night to remember for the Black Diamond City Council and staff when a 12-plus year moratorium on large subdivisions and developments fell by the wayside—and celebrate they did.

First order of business for the council during their Thursday, June 18, city council meeting was to hold a public hearing on an ordinance the council has seen before it every six months for over 12 years. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 11, 2003

By Kathleen E. Kear

Left to right: Conrad “Coke” Roberts (Class of ’41) and Joe Zumek (Class of ’43) look forward to meeting up with classmates they have not seen in many years as well as meeting other Black Diamond High School graduates for the first time.

Little did they know that when 36 students entered first grade in September 1931, the graduating class of 1943 would be the last class to graduate from Black Diamond High School. In honor of the Class of 1943 as well as commemorating the closing of the high school, over 70 Black Diamond graduates from its various graduating classes will be gathering once again to celebrate the 60th anniversary of the last class to graduate from Black Diamond High School.

Schoolmates from as far away as Las Vegas, California, Idaho, and Oregon will be making the trip to reminisce of days gone by. Two of those in attendance (both from the class of 1926) will include Ruby (Favro) Keeney, 96, of Enumclaw, and Ernesta (Franchini) Van der Heyden, 96, from a rest home in Lake Forest. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 10, 1998

By Cecilia Nguyen

Councilman Mario Sorci suggested to fellow council members that the council move forward with the proposal to expand from a body of five councilors to seven during the June 4 meeting.

“As we look to the summer months … there will be times when we won’t be able to get things done. We really need to go to seven members, said Sorci.

Mayor Howard Botts was in concurrence and asked the city attorney to begin drafting an ordinance concerning the council adding two addition members. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 4, 2003

By Kathleen E. Kear

Welsh descendant Joseph J. Thomas, 9, was laid to rest in the Black Diamond Cemetery in 1890 after being killed by a coal train.

Steeped in a rich heritage of life centered on coal mining, Black Diamond, which was the third largest city in the state of Washington at one time, could also boast of the many European immigrants settling in and around the bustling town.

One of the countries represented in the area was Wales. Between 1882 and 1885 a whole town of Welsh families from California moved to Washington bringing with them not only their rich Welsh inheritance, but also the name of their town—Black Diamond (known at times in California during that time period as Nortonville and today as Pittsburgh).

Along with their rich heritage, the families brought with them their mining tools and equipment in addition to their furnishings. Many of these items will be on view at the Black Diamond Museum during their 5th annual Welsh Heritage Day celebration on Saturday, June 7. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of Valley, May 16, 2006

By Barbara Nilson

In 1920 Fred Habenicht, holding a hand saw, supervised the unloading of the new hydraulic mine motor vehicle or pulling loaded mine cars from water level tunnel to the Continental Coal Co. bunker (in the background). It replaced mules in the mine. Miners are: 18-year-old Vern Habenicht; Bob Kingen Sr., Frenchy Ferdinand Maigre; Evor Morgan, holding the chain; and onlooker Bill Baldwin. (Photo—Habenicht collection from Ravensdale Reflections book)

Before the turn of the 20th century, coal seams ran from the shores of Lake Washington to the foot of the Cascade mountains leading to the establishment of towns at the mine sites, some of which are still in existence, i.e., Renton, Black Diamond, Cumberland, Issaquah, Wilkeson, and Ravensdale. Some linger in memory only, i.e., Franklin, Elk, Bayne, Durham, Danville, Eddyville, Taylor, and Landsburg.

From the year 1888 through 1967, there were an amazing 232 coal seams being tapped in King County and operated by 157 different companies. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 7, 2003

A critical component and huge step in the direction of securing funding for a firm source of drinking water and water infrastructure necessary to implement the Black Diamond Comprehensive Plan and Urban Growth Areas was approved by the council during the Thursday, April 17 city council meeting. (more…)

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