Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘washhouse’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 16, 1925

Thousands of Diamond Briquets have been shipped into the Yakima Valley this spring to protect the blossoming fruit trees from damage due to killing frosts. Throughout the orchards of Eastern Washington more than one hundred thousand briquet heaters are now playing their part in the production of bumper crops by radiating the warm glow of red hot briquets against the heretofore invulnerable attacks of Jack Frost.

The scene depicted herewith shows a shipment of Diamond Briquets being unloaded at the yards of Western Fuel Company in Yakima. The trucks are loading fuel to go to the orchards. At the same time, while being so extensively burned in the fruit districts, briquets are continuing to grow in popularity for use in logging operations and for steam shovel use, to say nothing of domestic demand. (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 29, 1925

Few coal camps in the country can boast of a wash house comparable with the splendid structure erected for that purpose in Carbonado. Of brick and hollow tile construction, with full cement floors, the building is modern throughout and equipped with every device for the comfort and convenience of the men.

Adding to its attractiveness is a neat lawn with ornamental flower beds in front of the building. A portion of the wing to the left is devoted to canteen purposes, providing pool tables and a stock of confectionery and tobacco for the men of the camp. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 3, 1924

Within the past week a German freighter, the Luise Hemsoth, and a British ocean carrier, the Ashworth, both took bunker coal at the Pacific Coast Coal Company bunkers. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 8, 1923

October was a banner month in the production department, and demonstrated that the mines and the new forces are prepared to do their part at any time the coal market returns to normal.

All previous production per man per day records were exceeded at Black Diamond, Burnett, and Newcastle, and at Burnett the total hoist for the month passed anything in the history of the mine.

These gratifying results were achieved because every man from the highest supervisor to the lowest laborer was on his toes and because everyone took an intense and a sincere interest in doing his particular part in showing what “we” can do. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 3, 1923

Around the top works of a mine the greatest noticeable activity is when the shifts are going on and coming off. During the rest of the time the trips come shooting up the shaft with machine-like regularity, discharge their coal cargoes, and drop back down again with little of the human element in evidence.

That those who stay on top might see who’s responsible below for the daily hoist the Bulletin herewith shows one group of the men ready to go underground for the graveyard shift.

Reading from left to right they are: Elmer Landis, Earl Cooper, L.A. Broulette, Tony Pinter (just peeking over Broulette’s shoulder), Ray Ellis, Wm. Holzhauser, Robt. Wallace, Ed. Sawyer, Joe Zeman, Phil Werle, Eli Celich, I.C. Thompson, and Wm. Kelly. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 2, 1922

issy-11-02-1922Waiting for “Mess call” at Issaquah. These men who are employed in digging, handling and producing coal at Issaquah had just patronized the wash house and changed into store clothes. Now they are waiting for “Bud” Rice, hotel manager, to give the chow signal so that they can “lay to.”

bd-11-02-1922There are many sounds pleasant to the ear, but a soup call to a hungry man—what could be sweeter?

They guard the works

Herewith we introduce E.L. Foreman, and F.A. Walters, sitting, both well known to everyone having occasion to enter the confines of the mine works at Black Diamond.

The armored fortress back of the men corresponds to the detention station on Ellis Island, and woe be it to any undesirables who attempt to get by these men.

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 17, 2006

By Barbara Nilson

Durham coal mine, August 1919 (Special Collections, University of Washington Libraries). This photo depicts the mine tipple and coal bunkers at the town of Durham in 1919, shortly before its acquisition by Morris Brother Coal Mining Company Inc. The Durham Colliery Company sold the entire town to Morris Brothers in 1922. This photo was shot from a perch on a coal slag pile that still exists to this day, looking across the Kanaskat-Kangley Road and the railroad tracks visible in the lower foreground. (Photo from Bill Kombol’s collection, Palmer Coking Coal Company.)

Durham coal mine, August 1919 (Special Collections, University of Washington Libraries). This photo depicts the mine tipple and coal bunkers at the town of Durham in 1919, shortly before its acquisition by Morris Brothers Coal Mining Company Inc. The Durham Colliery Company sold the entire town to Morris Brothers in 1922. This photo was shot from a perch on a coal slag pile that still exists to this day, looking across the Kanaskat-Kangley Road and the railroad tracks visible in the lower foreground. (Photo from Bill Kombol’s collection, Palmer Coking Coal Company.)

There is nothing left of the mining town of Durham, once located in southeast King County near the town of Selleck, but it still exists in the minds of Valleyites who grew up there.

The Durham Colliery (English for coal mines and its buildings) was originally organized by Peter Kirk in 1886 to supply coal for the projected Kirkland steel mill. Durham was named for a town in Kirk’s native north England. Production was started in 1888 but coal was only mined until 1889. In 1910, the mines were started again and coal was produced throughout WWI. The mines and associated mining facilities, i.e. hotel, bunkers and company houses, were sold as one unit to the Morris brothers. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »