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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 23, 2016

By Bill Kombol

Maple Valley’s third depot dates to 1953, shortly after it was built.

Maple Valley’s third depot dates to 1953, shortly after it was built.

Over the near century from 1885 to 1982, Maple Valley hosted three different railroad stations, all located in old Maple Valley just north of where Highway 18 overpasses SR-169. This photo of the third Maple Valley depot dates to 1953 shortly after it was built.

The Maple Valley station was an important cog for directing rail traffic as trains could be switched to Black Diamond, Taylor, or up the Cedar River through Landsburg into the watershed. (more…)

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Originally published in Seattle Daily Times, April 25, 1953

By Robert A. Barr

Safe at last: The two survivors of a C-46 plane crash near Cedar Lake early Thursday, James. P. Gilbert, standing, and John W. Schroeder, talked over their experience after being rescued and taken to Virginia Mason Hospital late yesterday. Though still weary and unshaven, the two men were in cheerful spirits and happy over their rescue. Neither was injured seriously. The two other men aboard the plane died in the crash. —Times staff photo by Larry Dion.

Safe at last: The two survivors of a C-46 plane crash near Cedar Lake early Thursday, James. P. Gilbert, standing, and John W. Schroeder, talked over their experience after being rescued and taken to Virginia Mason Hospital late yesterday. Though still weary and unshaven, the two men were in cheerful spirits and happy over their rescue. Neither was injured seriously. The two other men aboard the plane died in the crash. —Times staff photo by Larry Dion.

Only about 40 feet of altitude stood between a C-46 transport plane that crashed on a forested mountain ridge in the Cedar River watershed about 1 o’clock Thursday morning, and a safe landing at Seattle.

This was the estimate of lumberjacks from the Mountain Tree Farm Lumber Co. who carried out the two survivors, James Gilbert, 24, Miami, and John W. Schroeder, 34, Coral. Cables, Fla. Both are pilots who were “dead-heading” to Seattle as passengers.

The plane hit the tops of trees on the crest of a slight saddle in the ridge at the 4,500-foot level, shearing off its wings and the horizontal stabilizers the tail section. The fuselage then plunged about 400 feet down the mountainside.

Had the plane missed the ridge, it probably would have had clear flight on to Boeing Field, rescuers said.

The forward section of the 40-passenger transport, in which, the pilot, Maurice A. Booska, and the co-pilot, Donald F. Dwelley, both of Miami, were riding, was smashed as the fuselage slid down the mountainside, striking trees 30 inches in diameter. Both were killed.

(more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 24, 1953

Crash sites: Cross at left designates where the wreckage of a C-46 transport plane was sighted today, less than a mile from the site of the April 14 crash (right cross) of a DC-3 in which six died and 19 survived. The area is near Cedar Lake in South Central King County. Four crew members were aboard the C-46. Two survivors were rescued.

Crash sites: Cross at left designates where the wreckage of a C-46 transport plane was sighted today, less than a mile from the site of the April 14 crash (right cross) of a DC-3 in which six died and 19 survived. The area is near Cedar Lake in South Central King County. Four crew members were aboard the C-46. Two survivors were rescued.

Searchers today found the wreckage and two survivors of a C-46 transport that crashed early yesterday on a 4,200-foot ridge, less than a mile from where a DC-3 struck the Cascades foothills April 14. Two other men aboard the C-46 were dead.

The wreckage of the twin-engined, 40-passenger plane lay in timber on the snowy slopes of the ridge, a mile southwest of Cedar Lake in the Cedar River watershed of South Central King County. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 21, 1976

City of Seattle’s Masonry Dam on the Cedar River.

City of Seattle’s Masonry Dam on the Cedar River.

Only a crash program could replace the valve in the upper Cedar River Morse Dam this summer, committee members of the Cedar River Homeowners Protective Association were told by Seattle City Light and Water Department engineers at a meeting here last week.

The valve could provide some flood control by allowing an escapement of 500 cfs (cubic feet per second) under any head of water. The valve currently in use is a friction type with metal-to-metal contact. It leaks and can be operated only when the water level is low. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 20, 1977

Numerous lengths of 78-inch concrete-lined steel pipe at the old Western Sand and Gravel Company site east of SR-169 await installation as the Seattle Water Department prepares to replace 2,200 feet of pipeline. — Photo by Bob Gerbing

Numerous lengths of 78-inch concrete-lined steel pipe at the old Western Sand and Gravel Company site east of SR-169 await installation as the Seattle Water Department prepares to replace 2,200 feet of pipeline. — Photo by Bob Gerbing

The Seattle Water Department expects to complete its project of replacing some 2,200 feet of pipeline east of Highway 18 and north of Wilderness Village and SE 231st by mid-May, according to Jesse Ramey, director of operations. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 19, 1953

By William Plunkett
Times staff correspondent

Remarkable recovery: Pvt. Robert Lynch showed as much interest when he wiggled his toes as Capt. James Berger, center, and Col. Knox Dunlap, his surgeon. Lynch’s feet nearly were severed in the plane crash near Selleck Tuesday. Now, after the operation, he is expected to walk again. The casts on his legs were cut open so circulation to the damaged tissues would not be cut off. He was given a blood transfusion while the doctors examined him. Captain Berger was one of five doctors at the crash scene.

Remarkable recovery: Pvt. Robert Lynch showed as much interest when he wiggled his toes as Capt. James Berger, center, and Col. Knox Dunlap, his surgeon. Lynch’s feet nearly were severed in the plane crash near Selleck Tuesday. Now, after the operation, he is expected to walk again. The casts on his legs were cut open so circulation to the damaged tissues would not be cut off. He was given a blood transfusion while the doctors examined him. Captain Berger was one of five doctors at the crash scene.

MADIGAN ARMY HOSPITAL, April 18—When Pvt. Robert Lynch wiggled his toes here yesterday, staff members gasped in amazement and marveled at the work of Madigan’s chief orthopedic surgeon, Col. Knox Dunlap.

Lynch, a survivor of the Selleck plane crash, entered the hospital with the bones in his ankles severed, his feet hanging only by frozen tendons. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 18, 1953

By Ed Guthman

Stewardess grateful: Mrs. Adra Long, stewardess on the DC-3 transport that crashed Tuesday near Selleck, told three Selleck women who gave her first aid how much she appreciated what they did. Mrs. Long, recovering from leg cuts and bruises in Enumclaw Memorial Hospital, is shown at lower left as she looked when she collapsed in the arms of her rescuer, Lieut. Comdr. Robert T. Norris, Tuesday. The three women from left, Mrs. Bob Sayers, Mrs. Don Lennon, and Mrs. Fred Pettersen visited Mrs. Long to return a red coat Mrs. Long wore when she was rescued. They told Mrs. Long they had been struck by the fact that when she reached Selleck after her harrowing hike from the crash she still was wearing lipstick. Mrs. Long, who had hiked eight miles before being found, told the Selleck women she thought she would fly again.

Stewardess grateful: Mrs. Adra Long, stewardess on the DC-3 transport that crashed Tuesday near Selleck, told three Selleck women who gave her first aid how much she appreciated what they did. Mrs. Long, recovering from leg cuts and bruises in Enumclaw Memorial Hospital, is shown at lower left as she looked when she collapsed in the arms of her rescuer, Lieut. Comdr. Robert T. Norris, Tuesday. The three women from left, Mrs. Bob Sayers, Mrs. Don Lennon, and Mrs. Fred Pettersen visited Mrs. Long to return a red coat Mrs. Long wore when she was rescued. They told Mrs. Long they had been struck by the fact that when she reached Selleck after her harrowing hike from the crash she still was wearing lipstick. Mrs. Long, who had hiked eight miles before being found, told the Selleck women she thought she would fly again.

“The thing that sticks in my mind is that not one of those boys complained—and they had something to complain about.”

“That helicopter pilot was some man. How he flew that thing! I never saw anything like it.”

“For pluck, I’ll take the stewardess. There was a brave girl.”

“I took a look at the first boy they brought in on the helicopter. It was enough. I couldn’t bring myself to look at the others.”

That was the way the conversation went yesterday in Selleck, the peaceful logging community 18 miles southeast of Renton that became a hustling headquarters for the rescue Tuesday of survivors of a DC-3 plane crash on Cedar Mountain. (more…)

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