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Posts Tagged ‘watershed’

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, December 31, 1993

By Ellis E. Conklin
P-I Reporter

Gertrude Murphy, 90, picks through the remains of her home, the last one standing in Lester until a blaze destroyed it Sunday. (Bruce Moyer, P-I)

A little town, ailing for decades, finally died this week. The end was sudden and violent, in stark contrast to its long, quiet decline.

Nestled amid mountain peaks at the scenic headwaters of the Green River just below Stampede Pass, Lester was 102, only a dozen years older than Gertrude Murphy, the town’s last resident. Yesterday, she stood silently in the stinging cold watching smoke rise from the rubble of her home. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 30, 1923

Flames, sweeping timber in the Cedar River watershed and adjacent areas, reached within 300 yards of the City Light Department’s big hydroelectric station near Cedar Falls, surrounded Camp No. 2, the main Light Department camp, and menaced the town of Cedar Falls, according to messages telephoned to the Light Department this morning by firefighters.

Three main fires were running with terrific speed, fanned by a high wind, yesterday afternoon and last night.

Reports at noon today were, however, that high winds prevalent last night had died down, and that the fires would be kept under control unless the wind changes again. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 8, 2006

By Barbara Nilson

The town of Kerriston around 1915 showing the Northwest Lumber Co. — Photo donated to Maple Valley Historical Society by Maxine (Simon) Haugen.

The town of Kerriston around 1915 showing the Northwest Lumber Co. — Photo donated to Maple Valley Historical Society by Maxine (Simon) Haugen.

What does the former logging town of Kerriston on Tiger Mountain have to do with the Olympic Hotel in Seattle? They were both developed by the same man, Albert Sperry Kerry, Sr.

Kerry arrived in Seattle in 1886 and soon leased the Moran Company’s sawmill in Seattle, but it was destroyed by fire in 1897 so he and his brothers and others joined the trek to the newly discovered gold fields in the Yukon Territory.

Upon his return to Seattle in 1900, he built a sawmill that soon burned; he then entered into an agreement with the Northwest Improvement Company for purchase of timber on the southeast side of Tiger Mountain. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 27, 1917

Pacific States Lumber Company submits tenders for wood in three townships in city watershed

The Pacific States Lumber Company submitted a bid of more than $1,000,000 to the Board of Public Works today for the standing timber in three townships in the Cedar River watershed, contiguous to Cedar Lake. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 6, 1917

Pacific States Lumber Company wants to purchase material that will take years to log

That an offer will be made to the city of Seattle to purchase about 100,000,000 feet of standing timber in the Cedar River watershed, at a price of approximately $1,000,000, has been known to various city officials for several days, as a part of the general plan of the Pacific States Lumber Company to begin logging operations that will extend over a period of several years. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, March 7, 1913

Delay in the opening of bids by the Board of Public Works for standing timber in the Cedar River watershed, insisted upon by The Times, today resulted in a bid of 51 cents a thousand above the bid of a week ago for fir timber, 60,000,000 feet of which is to be sold. The bid was submitted by the Northwestern Lumber Company, operating a large mill at Kerriston, on the Northern Pacific. (more…)

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Originally published in the Kent News Journal, January 4, 1985

By Pat Jenkins
Staff Reporter

Move over, coal. Hydroelectricity wants to be the new industry on the block in Black Diamond.

It might never happen, but a proposal by private investors to build a hydroelectric generating plant near the Green River and put Black Diamond in the electricity business has the attention of officials in a city that’s famous for its coal-mining history. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, June 2007

Story and photos by Barbara Nilson

Paul Bartholomew and his daughter, Karen Lindquist, stand in front of the foundation for the press factory that made clay pipe.

The daffodils are blooming in Taylor as they do every spring to welcome back those who have fond memories of living there when it was a booming coal and clay company town. Taylor existed from 1892-1947, when the Seattle Public Utilities formed the Cedar River Watershed and closed the area to the public.

Each April the Utility District and Friends of the Cedar River Watershed offer the walking tour into Taylor for two weekends at a cost of $15. Participants gather at the Cedar River Watershed Visitors/Education Center for a slideshow of early day Taylor, then climb into vans for the 10-mile drive to the site.

The Education Center has interpretive exhibits that show where our water comes from and historical materials about the watershed area. It is an interesting place to browse anytime of the year. I especially like the musical artwork in the rain drum court where drops of water play tunes on the various drums. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 26, 1917

The Pacific States Lumber Company recently purchased approximately 400,000,000 feet of timber from the Northern Pacific Railway Company, situated in the vicinity of Cedar Lake, and will bid not only for the city timber but the timber on government property to be acquired for watershed purposes by the city.

All of the timber in the watershed, should the sale take place, will be logged under such sanitary regulations as may be promulgated by the health and sanitation department, and certain term of years will be allowed in which to remove all timber.

The coast of timber in the Cedar River watershed, as well as land, has been a charge against the water fund, and the revenues of the sale now proposed will be converted into that fund and used for extension purposes and betterments to the system.

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 15, 1915

Approximately 200,000,000 feet in Cedar River watershed to be disposed of by Board of Public Works

The Board of Public Works yesterday decided to call for bids on approximately 200,000,000 feet of standing timber which the city owns in the Cedar River watershed in the vicinity of Cedar Lake. So far as known, the Pacific States Lumber Company, which has already bargained for about an equal amount of timber now owned by the Northern Pacific Railway Company, the Weyerhaeuser Company, and the United States government, will be the only bidder.

Before the timber is sold the board decided yesterday to submit all bids to the city council, that body to determine whether or not the timber shall be sold at this time at the prices offered. The city tract contains fir, hemlock, and cedar, with a considerable smaller amount of spruce.

The Pacific States Lumber Company desires to secure enough timber in the Cedar River watershed to operate one of its mills for about eight years, by logging 50,000,000 feet a year.

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