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Posts Tagged ‘watershed’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 6, 1917

Pacific States Lumber Company wants to purchase material that will take years to log

That an offer will be made to the city of Seattle to purchase about 100,000,000 feet of standing timber in the Cedar River watershed, at a price of approximately $1,000,000, has been known to various city officials for several days, as a part of the general plan of the Pacific States Lumber Company to begin logging operations that will extend over a period of several years. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, March 7, 1913

Delay in the opening of bids by the Board of Public Works for standing timber in the Cedar River watershed, insisted upon by The Times, today resulted in a bid of 51 cents a thousand above the bid of a week ago for fir timber, 60,000,000 feet of which is to be sold. The bid was submitted by the Northwestern Lumber Company, operating a large mill at Kerriston, on the Northern Pacific. (more…)

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Originally published in the Kent News Journal, January 4, 1985

By Pat Jenkins
Staff Reporter

Move over, coal. Hydroelectricity wants to be the new industry on the block in Black Diamond.

It might never happen, but a proposal by private investors to build a hydroelectric generating plant near the Green River and put Black Diamond in the electricity business has the attention of officials in a city that’s famous for its coal-mining history. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, June 2007

Story and photos by Barbara Nilson

Paul Bartholomew and his daughter, Karen Lindquist, stand in front of the foundation for the press factory that made clay pipe.

The daffodils are blooming in Taylor as they do every spring to welcome back those who have fond memories of living there when it was a booming coal and clay company town. Taylor existed from 1892-1947, when the Seattle Public Utilities formed the Cedar River Watershed and closed the area to the public.

Each April the Utility District and Friends of the Cedar River Watershed offer the walking tour into Taylor for two weekends at a cost of $15. Participants gather at the Cedar River Watershed Visitors/Education Center for a slideshow of early day Taylor, then climb into vans for the 10-mile drive to the site.

The Education Center has interpretive exhibits that show where our water comes from and historical materials about the watershed area. It is an interesting place to browse anytime of the year. I especially like the musical artwork in the rain drum court where drops of water play tunes on the various drums. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 26, 1917

The Pacific States Lumber Company recently purchased approximately 400,000,000 feet of timber from the Northern Pacific Railway Company, situated in the vicinity of Cedar Lake, and will bid not only for the city timber but the timber on government property to be acquired for watershed purposes by the city.

All of the timber in the watershed, should the sale take place, will be logged under such sanitary regulations as may be promulgated by the health and sanitation department, and certain term of years will be allowed in which to remove all timber.

The coast of timber in the Cedar River watershed, as well as land, has been a charge against the water fund, and the revenues of the sale now proposed will be converted into that fund and used for extension purposes and betterments to the system.

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 15, 1915

Approximately 200,000,000 feet in Cedar River watershed to be disposed of by Board of Public Works

The Board of Public Works yesterday decided to call for bids on approximately 200,000,000 feet of standing timber which the city owns in the Cedar River watershed in the vicinity of Cedar Lake. So far as known, the Pacific States Lumber Company, which has already bargained for about an equal amount of timber now owned by the Northern Pacific Railway Company, the Weyerhaeuser Company, and the United States government, will be the only bidder.

Before the timber is sold the board decided yesterday to submit all bids to the city council, that body to determine whether or not the timber shall be sold at this time at the prices offered. The city tract contains fir, hemlock, and cedar, with a considerable smaller amount of spruce.

The Pacific States Lumber Company desires to secure enough timber in the Cedar River watershed to operate one of its mills for about eight years, by logging 50,000,000 feet a year.

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 7, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

Of all the “lost” towns of King County the mostly thoroughly obliterated probably is Taylor, seven miles east of Maple Valley.

Taylor, once with a population close to 700 persons, was swallowed by the Cedar River watershed. Today a young forest is springing from its streets and gardens, and the sites of the coal bunkers and kilns of its once-prosperous clay industry.

Taylor ceased to exist in 1947. Two years earlier, the Seattle Water Department had obtained a condemnation judgment permitting it to include the town in the watershed. (more…)

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