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Posts Tagged ‘West Coast’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, February 20, 1927

Three towns will be served by splendid structure in Union District on Cedar River

The photograph shows the new $65,000 structure in which a Taylor-Hobart-Maplevalley union high school will open tomorrow, and Earl D. Bonham, superintendent of the district.

The photograph shows the new $65,000 structure in which a Taylor-Hobart-Maplevalley union high school will open tomorrow, and Earl D. Bonham, superintendent of the district.

Like a youngster who appears wearing his first long trousers, the Seattle community shows its rapid growth by definite new things. Just as such a boy surprises you some morning, so do pleasant surprises like the new Union High School at Maplevalley, hit the observer with not unpleasant frequency.

The Tahoma High School opens tomorrow in a $65,000 building a mile east of Maplevalley, and twenty-nine miles from downtown Seattle.

All that region, which is tapped by the Cedar River, along which is a paved road almost to the town of Maplevalley, is on the rise. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, November 13, 1925

Robert A. Dinsmore, 1818 Terry Ave., victim of accident at coal mine near Renton

In a fall of forty-two feet from a staging erected around the bunkers of the West Coast Coal Company mine at Cedar Mountain, six miles south of Renton, Robert A. Dinsmore, 42 years old, a carpenter, 1818 Terry Ave., Seattle, was almost instantly killed late yesterday. (more…)

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All aboard for home: When the men come off shift at the New Black Diamond mine they find themselves in the same situation as the average city worker—a long way from home. Consequently the company runs a special train for each shift, covering the distance between the mine and the camp in 45 minutes. West Seattle or Ballard residents who journey downtown on the Municipal Railway in many cases require an hour or more to get to their work. The picture shows the train ready to pull out with the shift coming off in the afternoon. (Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 17, 1927)

All aboard for home: When the men come off shift at the New Black Diamond mine they find themselves in the same situation as the average city worker—a long way from home. Consequently the company runs a special train for each shift, covering the distance between the mine and the camp in 45 minutes. West Seattle or Ballard residents who journey downtown on the Municipal Railway in many cases require an hour or more to get to their work. The picture shows the train ready to pull out with the shift coming off in the afternoon. (Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 17, 1927)

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 25, 1927

If the company’s proposal for workmen’s trains between Black Diamond, West Coast, and New Black Diamond Mines is approved at a special council meeting to be called in Black Diamond Friday evening, the trains will start the new service the morning of Tuesday, March 1. The proposed schedule is as follows: * (more…)

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