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Posts Tagged ‘Weyerhaeuser’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 6, 1917

Pacific States Lumber Company wants to purchase material that will take years to log

That an offer will be made to the city of Seattle to purchase about 100,000,000 feet of standing timber in the Cedar River watershed, at a price of approximately $1,000,000, has been known to various city officials for several days, as a part of the general plan of the Pacific States Lumber Company to begin logging operations that will extend over a period of several years. (more…)

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Originally published in the Journal-American, April 9, 1990

By Leslee Jaquette
Journal Eastside Bureau

Douglas C. Samuels (left), one of the owners of Pacific States Marketing Co. and president of Pacific States Mortgage Co., Robert Olsson, the other owner of Pacific States Marketing Co. and vice president, Pacific States Mortgage Corp.; and Jack L. McIntosh, president of M&H Development, examining map of the Black Diamond area where M&H plans to develop a “Bridle Trails” theme estate. Photo by Leslee Jaquette.

BELLEVUE — M&H Development Co., Inc. of Bellevue has acquired a 410-acre, $2.8 million tract adjacent to Black Diamond which will be developed into a “Bridle Trails” theme estate.

Jack L. McIntosh, president, says up to 82, five-acre tracts will be developed on the plateau parcel which fronts Black Diamond Lake and stretches to the north edge of the Flaming Geysers State Park. The developer foresees $500,000 to $1 million homes will be built on $150,000 lots available through both builder and public sale. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 27, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The families of Hobart pioneers, Rudolph and Julie (Gradishnick) Grady and Olga (Grady) and Rudy Petchnick, will be featured at the Sunday, April 15th reunion at the Hobart Community Church, at 1:30 p.m. The program is sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, March 26, 1987

A marshy area adjacent to a small lake that lies southwest of Black Diamond may be one of the keys to the city’s future, if land developer Steve Graddon’s dream comes true.

Graddon presented his ambitious plan that involves a low-impact housing development and a nature preserve that would be the focus of “scientists from around the world,” to the Black Diamond city council Thursday, March 19.

At the center or the plan is Black Diamond Lake, or Chubb Lake as the old-timers call it. About 35 acres of the lake’s shore is made up of a forested sphagnum moss bog, one of only five known in the state. The bog is considered to be in pristine condition, thus making it more valuable to researchers. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 30, 2007

By Kathleen Kear

Getting ready to celebrate her 100th birthday is Ruby Favro Androsko Keeney (left). Also pictured with Keeney is son, Joe Androsko (center), and husband, Lee (right).

Looking forward to celebrating her first century of life, former Black Diamond resident Ruby Favro Androsko Keeney has plenty of tales to share about growing up in Black Diamond.

Born on February 4, 1907, to father, Joe Favro (a Black Diamond coal miner), and mother, Mary (a stay-at-home mom), Keeney grew up to become one of thirteen Black Diamond High School graduates in the class of 1926. Soon after graduation, she went to work at the Black Diamond Bakery. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maple Valley Bugle, December 2015

By D’Ann Tedford

Built in 1891 on Renton-Maple Valley road, the restored W.D. Gibbon General Merchandise store and post office is now located on Witte Road. It is open to the public on the 1st Saturday of each month, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. See also http://www.maplevalleyhistorical.com.

Visiting history at Maple Valley Historical Society’s site on Witte Road, one sees the name “Gibbon” prominently displayed on the 124-year-old restored building, “W.D. Gibbon General Merchandise.” In its years, the store also served as Maple Valley’s post office and it held a barbershop, remnants of which are visible during tours.

Gibbon had studied to be an educator but acquired the store that had been built in 1891 on Renton-Maple Valley road. His wife Lizzie had attended Washington Territorial University (now U of W) and became the first school-teacher in Black Diamond, seven miles south of the general store. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 15, 1915

Approximately 200,000,000 feet in Cedar River watershed to be disposed of by Board of Public Works

The Board of Public Works yesterday decided to call for bids on approximately 200,000,000 feet of standing timber which the city owns in the Cedar River watershed in the vicinity of Cedar Lake. So far as known, the Pacific States Lumber Company, which has already bargained for about an equal amount of timber now owned by the Northern Pacific Railway Company, the Weyerhaeuser Company, and the United States government, will be the only bidder.

Before the timber is sold the board decided yesterday to submit all bids to the city council, that body to determine whether or not the timber shall be sold at this time at the prices offered. The city tract contains fir, hemlock, and cedar, with a considerable smaller amount of spruce.

The Pacific States Lumber Company desires to secure enough timber in the Cedar River watershed to operate one of its mills for about eight years, by logging 50,000,000 feet a year.

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, November 9, 1988

By McKay Jenkins

Remove the chain from the yellow caboose sitting in front of the Black Diamond Historical Society and you’ll open a door to the city’s history.

Inside, beneath the rotting ceilings and creaking floorboards, is a dilapidated testament to the men who once hauled their livelihoods from the bowels of the earth.

The museum that once housed the town’s train depot now has a train pulled up in front of the station. All that remains is a lot of restoration work for volunteers, said Bob Eaton, the museum’s president.

The caboose was built by Pacific Car and Foundry in Renton in 1921 for the Northern Pacific Railway. Weyerhaeuser then bought it to transport wood, and eventually gave it to the Puget Sound Railway Historical Association. (more…)

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Prepared for the membership of the PNR-NMRA, September 13, 1958

By H.A. Durfy

Coal—black diamonds—a source of heat, light, power, medicines, and many more products too numerous to mention here. This was the beginning of the Pacific Coast R.R. Co., upon which you are riding today. Of course, like other railroads, the Pacific Coast R.R. Co. was not always known by the present title, and we want to lead you through the background and the beginnings of the railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 22, 1978

This big “mountain” behind the Hi-Lo shopping area in Black Diamond is a rock dump from coal mining operations of material “unusable at the present time,” Palmer Coal Company officials say. Any coal bed will consist of the coal plus layers of clay or high ash carbonaceous material which will have to be discarded to achieve a certain standard of quality for the salable product, and that is what this pile is. The pile grew between 1945 and two or three years ago. Other methods of discarding material are now being used. —Voice photo by Bob Gerbing

This big “mountain” behind the Hi-Lo shopping area in Black Diamond is a rock dump from coal mining operations of material “unusable at the present time,” Palmer Coal Company officials say. Any coal bed will consist of the coal plus layers of clay or high ash carbonaceous material which will have to be discarded to achieve a certain standard of quality for the salable product, and that is what this pile is. The pile grew between 1945 and two or three years ago. Other methods of discarding material are now being used. —Voice photo by Bob Gerbing

“Don’t buy your miner’s lamp yet!” Hugh McIntosh, public information manager for Seattle City Light, cautioned the Voice last week.

He referred to recently published reports regarding the possibility of reopening mining operations in the Green River coal fields, including the old mining towns of Black Diamond, Morganville, and Franklin. (more…)

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