Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘White River’

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 15, 1920

Seattle motorists afforded opportunity to enjoy big variety of scenery and save on their gasoline

Pretty little resort welcomes all guests

Times’ tours party takes trip and writer describes routes and what may be seen at end of journey

These photographs show the beauties of Green River Gorge, within easy reach of motorists from Seattle. 1—Placid Deep Lake on the way to the gorge. 2—The turbulent river far below the steel bridge across the gorge. 3—The swift-moving river, perpetual agent of erosion, works its way in the gorge ever deeper and deeper between the walls of stone.

These photographs show the beauties of Green River Gorge, within easy reach of motorists from Seattle. 1—Placid Deep Lake on the way to the gorge. 2—The turbulent river far below the steel bridge across the gorge. 3—The swift-moving river, perpetual agent of erosion, works its way in the gorge ever deeper and deeper between the walls of stone.

One of most desirable features of Puget Sound motoring is that within a very short distance of Seattle there are literally dozens of beautiful runs, some long, some short, but all interesting and attractive. (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 3, 1983

By Herb Belanger
Times suburban bureau

Neely Mansion

Neely Mansion, located on the Auburn-Black Diamond Road, was built in 1894. The building is in the National Register of Historic Places and was the second structure placed on the county register of landmarks.

The future of two structures intimately connected to the development and early settlement in King County may hinge on two separate meetings to be held this month.

The first will be at the Auburn City Hall Monday at 7:30 p.m. when people interested in the fate of the Neely Mansion, tied to the early settlement of the Green River Valley, will meet to see if something can be done about continuing a restoration project which has been halted for lack of funds.

The second meeting will be that of the county’s Landmarks Commission, Aug. 11 at 11 a.m. in the eighth-floor conference room of the Alaska Building, Seattle, when a decision will be made on whether the railroad depot in the Cascade Mountain town of Lester should be recognized as a county landmark. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, January 27, 1918

Report on flood damage made to King County commissioners by Engineer Humes

It will cost $60,000 to repair damage done to the bridges of King County by the recent two floods, County Engineer Samuel J. Humes yesterday advised the Board of County Commissioners. He said a survey of all the damaged bridges have been completed and that in his estimate of the restoration cost he included 73 feet of trestle to be built as an emergency measure to replace the stretch of the Renton-Maple Valley road washed out by the Cedar River. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Times, January 27, 1957

By Lucile McDonald

An almost forgotten structure on the White River is shown in part in the Page 1 color illustration of today’s Magazine Section. It is a drift barrier of concrete piers and cables, built some 40 years ago in an effort to prevent driftwood jams and control floods. The barrier is in the Muckleshoot Reservation, southeast of Auburn. It is reached by way of a road between Newaukum and the Academy District.

An almost forgotten structure on the White River is shown in part in the Page 1 color illustration of today’s Magazine Section. It is a drift barrier of concrete piers and cables, built some 40 years ago in an effort to prevent driftwood jams and control floods. The barrier is in the Muckleshoot Reservation, southeast of Auburn. It is reached by way of a road between Newaukum and the Academy District.

Washington has a river which nobody wanted … the White.

Today the White River’s waters pour into Puget Sound through a channel 20 miles shorter than the one it followed for untold centuries.

Until 1906 the stream flowed northward into the Green River, thence to the Duwamish and the “salt chuck.” Today it empties into the Puyallup, at Sumner, by way of the Stuck—a river which, technically speaking, has disappeared, although its name still is used by Auburn residents and appears on a state-highway bridge.

All of these rivers were once parts of the same great basin, its fingers extending into the mountain valleys. The land, built up by glacial action, eroded easily and the stream channels, made when the area was emerging from the sea, were unstable and sinuous. In flood seasons they sprawled out of banks.

The White River, with its deep mountain canyon and drift jams, was especially menacing and farmers had no love for it. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Entire valley under water and the junction shut off from outside communication

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, January 5, 1903

The Denny-Renton Clay Co.’s first factory was located at Van Asselt, located near today’s Boeing Field. It was named for Henry Van Asselt (pictured), one of the county’s first pioneers. To learn more about Henry Van Asselt, read this article from the <a href="http://sococulture.org/duwamish-pioneer-served-civil-war-militia/" target="_blank">South King County Cultural Coalition</a>.

The Denny-Renton Clay Co.’s first factory was located at Van Asselt, located near today’s Boeing Field. It was named for Henry Van Asselt, one of the county’s first pioneers. To learn more about Henry Van Asselt, read this article from the South King County Cultural Coalition.

BLACK RIVER, Monday, Jan. 5—The entire valley is practically under water. The river is higher than ever known before. Late last evening water raised until the Columbia & Puget Sound track was flooded and washed out for a quarter of a mile. Great damage was done the Northern Pacific double track between here and Argo. Two bridges and many culverts are gone and railway traffic is entirely suspended. There is a great loss of livestock reported. No human lives have been lost.

The river reached its height about midnight and is now falling. The highway between here and Orillia is impassible except by boat. The interurban railway is practically all gone between Kent and Van Asselt. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 4, 1923

By George Watkin Evans

George Watkin Evans (1876-1951), 1924 Courtesy Seattle and Environs

George Watkin Evans, 1924

There are two principal theories of coal formation, one called the Drift Theory and the other In Situ.

There are advocates of both theories, and personally I believe that each is right within limits. I am of the opinion that some coal beds have been formed in the places where we now find them, whereas in other instances, the vegetable matter which constitutes the coal bed grew in another spot and has been transported by water to the place where we now find the coal.

In the Drift Theory it is assumed that the vegetable matter grew in one spot and a current of water carried the decaying vegetal material and deposited it some distance from the spot on which it grew.

One argument for this theory is that there are many partings of shale and other impurities in some of our coal beds and again some of the coal itself is very heavy in ash. It is reasoned that if the material was not carried by currents and deposited some distance from the place where it grew that the partings of shale and other impurities would not be associated with the coal. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 5, 1922

A few of the second-shift men who “whoop it up” at Newcastle. This picture was taken “just before the battle, Mother,” which accounts for the well-fed appearance of the crew, the clean faces and the general air of contentment. We don’t know why they didn’t laugh—the photographer told them his funniest gag, but there was nary a cackle. It is tuff, we’ll admit, to work a second shift. It interferes with one’s evenings so.

A few of the second-shift men who “whoop it up” at Newcastle. This picture was taken “just before the battle, Mother,” which accounts for the well-fed appearance of the crew, the clean faces and the general air of contentment. We don’t know why they didn’t laugh—the photographer told them his funniest gag, but there was nary a cackle. It is tuff, we’ll admit, to work a second shift. It interferes with one’s evenings so.

Facts about coal industry presented in forceful manner by noted writer

Floyd W. Parsons, a prolific contributor to national magazines and an authority on industrial questions, in an article entitled, “Coal Economies,” appearing in the Saturday Evening Post, issue of September 30, stresses some points and calls attention to certain facts we believe will be read with interest by many employees of this company. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »