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Posts Tagged ‘White River’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, November 22, 1925

Prosperous town on Naches Pass Highway surrounded by rich agricultural, timber, and mineral lands, is boasting of rapid development

New mill of the White River Lumber Company on the White River, three miles from Enumclaw.

One of the earliest settlements in that part of the state and the only place of that name in the United States, Enumclaw, forty miles southeast of Seattle, is one of the biggest little towns in the West.

Early history and distinctive name, however, are not Enumclaw’s only claims for attention. Thought its early growth was slow, Enumclaw today is counted one of the most prosperous towns in the Puget Sound region. Rich agricultural land, timber, and mineral surround it. It is on the Naches Pass highway, the most direct route between Seattle and the west entrance to Mount Rainier Nation Park. It is the gateway to unlimited scenic attractions, fishing, and hunting grounds. Backup up against the Cascade foothills, Enumclaw is within two hours’ drive of perpetual snow on one side and the waters of Puget Sound on the other. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, December 16, 1921

Farmers living in the White River Valley were obliged to drive their cattle to the hills for safety.

Renton, Tukwila, and Riverton are under water and people traveling about the towns are obliged to wear hip boots or go on a raft.

Here in Enumclaw many basements were flooded by surface water but little serious damage has been done. Travel between here and Seattle on the highway was stopped by high water near Kent. That city suffered considerable from inundation.

Estimated cost of damage to roads and other losses in King County may run over $400,000.

The flood conditions have been worse than in any season for many years.

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 19, 1924

Steamships of the Nippon Yusen Kaisha line have been coming into Seattle for more than twenty-five years, in fact, this famous line was the first to establish regular service between Puget Sound ports and the Orient. Recognizing the superior qualities of Black Diamond and South Prairie coal for bunkering purposes, the vessels of the N.Y.K. fleet have frequently coaled at the Pacific Coast Coal Company bunkers.

The accompanying half-tone is a reproduction of a photograph taken of the Shidzuoka Maru while loading 1,000 tons of Black Diamond and South Prairie coal at the company bunkers last week. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 12, 1924

Summer time in Juneau, Alaska, is not the most favorable season in which to sell coal to the domestic consumer. But the view shown herewith of the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s Juneau depot, taken in the month of July, shows not a truck in sight. This is because Agent H.G. Walmsley had them all out making deliveries, even though the mid-day sun made a shady corner most inviting. “Walms” was formerly a company employee at Newcastle. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 22, 1924

Rendering everything from classic selections and overtures to modern waltzes and jazz numbers, the Newcastle Band provided a musical program of exceptional excellence at the Western Washington Mine Rescue and First Aid Meet in Carbonado.

Under the able direction of Bandmaster Archie Johnson the Newcastle Band is much in demand at all social events in the camp. This picture shows the band playing on the field at Carbonado. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 3, 1988

By Joe Haberstroh and Margaret Bakken

The Enumclaw Plateau’s proposed community plan calls for slow growth, but some of the plan’s authors fear the proposed restrictions may freeze out people who had planned to build homes on small lots.

No one is sure how much land would be rezoned under the plan that Enumclaw Plateau residents in southeastern King County are receiving in the mail this week from King County. But sizable parcels once set aside for one-acre lots are proposed for a zone with lots 2 1/2 acres and larger. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 1, 1924

What more could a girl want than to enjoy the privileges of membership in the Ta-Ta-Pochon Camp Fire of Burnett? Ask any of the young ladies who appear in the group shown herewith and you’ll get an emphatic answer. California’s press agents couldn’t muster a finer bevy of feminine pulchritude in all of Mack Sennett’s legions than Burnett can boast.

From left to right they are: Ida Ellis, Audrey Parry, Margaret Murnan, Alma Johnson, Lee Dora Bumgarner, Mary Jackson, June Vernon, Hazel Miller, and Lee Miller. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, July 31, 2002

By Desiree Lerum
For the Courier-Herald

From his computer terminal at the food bank, Enumclaw’s Roy Dalsanto keeps track of donations and recipients. (Photo by Brenda Sexton.)

From his computer terminal at the food bank, Enumclaw’s Roy Dalsanto keeps track of donations and recipients. (Photo by Brenda Sexton.)

Roy Dalsanto remembers as a young child going to the local church to pick up the bags of flour and sugar his family received on a welfare-type program. His father had been injured while working in the Black Diamond coal mines and the family was short on money.

Because of that, Dalsanto can identify with the people who use the services of the Enumclaw Food Bank that he runs. He enjoys giving people the help they need through the food bank.

“My family needed help and I like to help others,” he said. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 25, 1924

Though it may have been considered futile and useless to talk of shipping coal to Newcastle—we mean the Newcastle of Merrie England—it is an accomplished fact that the Pacific Coast Coal Company ships coal to Vancouver, British Columbia.

Evidence of this is seen in the two scows here shown loading at the Pacific Coast Coal Company bunkers. Each scow takes approximately 475 tons of Newcastle buckwheat coal, which is then towed to Vancouver for delivery to the British Columbia Sugar Refinery.

Approximately sixteen hours is required to tow the loaded scows to their destination. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, November 26, 1885

The system of King County—Its cost, mileage, present and future traffic, etc.

The railroad system in King County is one of considerable magnitude now, and of rising importance. It is the largest enterprise in the county, and is doing more to increase and sustain the population than any other. Aside from the value of real estate held by the corporations, they have railroad properties in the county aggregating about $2,000,000. These properties consist of the tracks, wharves, depots, bunkers, shops, rolling stock, etc. (more…)

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