Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘White River’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 3, 1988

By Joe Haberstroh and Margaret Bakken

The Enumclaw Plateau’s proposed community plan calls for slow growth, but some of the plan’s authors fear the proposed restrictions may freeze out people who had planned to build homes on small lots.

No one is sure how much land would be rezoned under the plan that Enumclaw Plateau residents in southeastern King County are receiving in the mail this week from King County. But sizable parcels once set aside for one-acre lots are proposed for a zone with lots 2 1/2 acres and larger. (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 1, 1924

What more could a girl want than to enjoy the privileges of membership in the Ta-Ta-Pochon Camp Fire of Burnett? Ask any of the young ladies who appear in the group shown herewith and you’ll get an emphatic answer. California’s press agents couldn’t muster a finer bevy of feminine pulchritude in all of Mack Sennett’s legions than Burnett can boast.

From left to right they are: Ida Ellis, Audrey Parry, Margaret Murnan, Alma Johnson, Lee Dora Bumgarner, Mary Jackson, June Vernon, Hazel Miller, and Lee Miller. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, July 31, 2002

By Desiree Lerum
For the Courier-Herald

From his computer terminal at the food bank, Enumclaw’s Roy Dalsanto keeps track of donations and recipients. (Photo by Brenda Sexton.)

From his computer terminal at the food bank, Enumclaw’s Roy Dalsanto keeps track of donations and recipients. (Photo by Brenda Sexton.)

Roy Dalsanto remembers as a young child going to the local church to pick up the bags of flour and sugar his family received on a welfare-type program. His father had been injured while working in the Black Diamond coal mines and the family was short on money.

Because of that, Dalsanto can identify with the people who use the services of the Enumclaw Food Bank that he runs. He enjoys giving people the help they need through the food bank.

“My family needed help and I like to help others,” he said. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 25, 1924

Though it may have been considered futile and useless to talk of shipping coal to Newcastle—we mean the Newcastle of Merrie England—it is an accomplished fact that the Pacific Coast Coal Company ships coal to Vancouver, British Columbia.

Evidence of this is seen in the two scows here shown loading at the Pacific Coast Coal Company bunkers. Each scow takes approximately 475 tons of Newcastle buckwheat coal, which is then towed to Vancouver for delivery to the British Columbia Sugar Refinery.

Approximately sixteen hours is required to tow the loaded scows to their destination. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, November 26, 1885

The system of King County—Its cost, mileage, present and future traffic, etc.

The railroad system in King County is one of considerable magnitude now, and of rising importance. It is the largest enterprise in the county, and is doing more to increase and sustain the population than any other. Aside from the value of real estate held by the corporations, they have railroad properties in the county aggregating about $2,000,000. These properties consist of the tracks, wharves, depots, bunkers, shops, rolling stock, etc. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 15, 1920

Seattle motorists afforded opportunity to enjoy big variety of scenery and save on their gasoline

Pretty little resort welcomes all guests

Times’ tours party takes trip and writer describes routes and what may be seen at end of journey

These photographs show the beauties of Green River Gorge, within easy reach of motorists from Seattle. 1—Placid Deep Lake on the way to the gorge. 2—The turbulent river far below the steel bridge across the gorge. 3—The swift-moving river, perpetual agent of erosion, works its way in the gorge ever deeper and deeper between the walls of stone.

These photographs show the beauties of Green River Gorge, within easy reach of motorists from Seattle. 1—Placid Deep Lake on the way to the gorge. 2—The turbulent river far below the steel bridge across the gorge. 3—The swift-moving river, perpetual agent of erosion, works its way in the gorge ever deeper and deeper between the walls of stone.

One of most desirable features of Puget Sound motoring is that within a very short distance of Seattle there are literally dozens of beautiful runs, some long, some short, but all interesting and attractive. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 3, 1983

By Herb Belanger
Times suburban bureau

Neely Mansion

Neely Mansion, located on the Auburn-Black Diamond Road, was built in 1894. The building is in the National Register of Historic Places and was the second structure placed on the county register of landmarks.

The future of two structures intimately connected to the development and early settlement in King County may hinge on two separate meetings to be held this month.

The first will be at the Auburn City Hall Monday at 7:30 p.m. when people interested in the fate of the Neely Mansion, tied to the early settlement of the Green River Valley, will meet to see if something can be done about continuing a restoration project which has been halted for lack of funds.

The second meeting will be that of the county’s Landmarks Commission, Aug. 11 at 11 a.m. in the eighth-floor conference room of the Alaska Building, Seattle, when a decision will be made on whether the railroad depot in the Cascade Mountain town of Lester should be recognized as a county landmark. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »