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Posts Tagged ‘Wilkeson’

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, September 27, 1935

Coal mines in the Enumclaw district were stilled this week with the announcement of the nationwide soft coal miners strike. The local union members joined in the nationwide strike and about 2,000 miners in this state are now on strike. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 26, 1924

Diamond Briquets were recently given wide and favorable publicity in Juneau, Alaska, when Harold Lloyd appeared in the film feature, Why Worry, at one of the Juneau theatres. H.G. Walmsley, manager of the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s depot at the Alaskan capital, arranged with the exhibitors of this picture to place fifteen of these 16-foot signs about the city.

Dealers handling Diamond Briquets, from Skagway, Alaska, in the north, to Hornbrook, California, in the south, all report no worries with this popular fuel. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 9, 1914

Pete Frederickson, Black Diamond butcher, won the prize for the most handsomely decorated auto.

Pete Frederickson, Black Diamond butcher, won the prize for the most handsomely decorated auto.

That the team entered by the local miners’ union was victorious in the mine rescue and first aid meet held in Black Diamond on Labor Day, defeating the fire bosses’ team organized by the mine operators, is the report to Seattle by William Short, state district secretary of the United Mine Workers, who served as master of ceremonies at Black Diamond’s celebration of the holiday. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 1, 1913

BLACK DIAMOND, Wash., Monday, Sept. 1. – Miners from Renton, Carbonado, Wilkeson, Ravensdale, Taylor, and Newcastle are here today to help the local union of the United Mine Workers of America observe Labor Day. The day’s program opened this morning with a parade of 2,500 miners led by a band from Carbonado.

Following the parade the crowd went to the baseball park, where representative of the miners’ organization addressed the gathering. William Short acted as chairman and speeches were made by Martin Flyzik, vice-president of the district, and Frank Farrington, international representative of the mine workers’ organization.

Original plans for the speakers included an I.W.W. from Seattle, but members of the local who learned of the plan prevailed on the committee to cancel the engagement.

Races and a baseball game between Black Diamond and Taylor were held this afternoon.

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Originally published in Carbon River Heritage newsletter, July 1986

by Nancy Irene Hall

James L. Brummett, ex-Coast Guard officer-turned trapper, fisherman, and hunter. Jim posing with some of his furs on the dock of his Double Rainbow Lake Resort located just 2 miles east of Wilkeson on the Quinnon exit. (Photo by Nancy Irene Hall.)

James L. Brummett, ex-Coast Guard officer-turned trapper, fisherman, and hunter. Jim posing with some of his furs on the dock of his Double Rainbow Lake Resort located just 2 miles east of Wilkeson on the Quinnon exit. (Photo by Nancy Irene Hall.)

The site of the old coal mine town once called South Willis lies just a few miles east of Wilkeson on the Quinnion exit. It is now the home of Double Rainbow Resort, a 25-acre resort run by James L. Brummett. This land has seen many changes since its coal mining days.

It was named after the Northern Pacific Railroad’s young geologist Bailey Willis, who did the coal explorations for their Northern Transcontinental Survey in 1881–1884. After his explorations he gave his account of the coal in the Wilkeson, South Willis, Carbonado area in a paper entitled “Report of the Coal Fields of Washington Territory.” (more…)

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Respect for the flag is one of the first marks of patriotism. The man who can talk the loudest about the duties of citizenship often forgets to uncover when the flag goes marching by, or sits with a bored expression on his face when the national anthem is played. It is not for the flag itself, but rather for what it stands, that every true American owes due homage and respect to its starry folds.

Salute the flag! Stand at attention to the strains of The Star Spangled Banner! For thus is patriotism fostered in the youth of our land and respect for law and order maintained. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, June 28, 1989

Fourteen sites in Pierce County and two sites in King County have been selected as locations for Washington centennial historical markers.

Puget Sound Power and Light will donate the markers to be placed in about 85 communities throughout its nine-county service area.

The 10-inch-square markers will replicate the official centennial dome shape and will be cast in solid brass by Anacortes Brass Works. They will be presented during ceremonies to be held during the summer months. (more…)

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