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Posts Tagged ‘World War II’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 17, 1986

By Jim Simon

You load sixteen tons and what do you get,
Another day older and deeper in debt,
Saint Peter don’t you call me ’cause I can’’t go,
I owe my soul to the company store.

“Sixteen Tons,” by Merle Travis

It has become part of our folklore: the brutal, indentured existence of miners and millworkers eking out a living in sooty company towns. We all know it was a life of oppression.

But don’t tell that to Edna Crews. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, October 1993

By Barbara Nilson

Gathered on the front porch of the former Olson mansion on September 20 are Roosevelt (Ted) Olson and his wife, Cleo, at far right. In the back row are Ted’s nephews Jim Oien, Issaquah, and Keith Oien, Enumclaw, sons of Adeline Olson Oien; at back right is Vincent Olson, of Bothell, son of Ted. In front of Vincent is Ted’s daughter, Maureen Olson Engbert, of Seattle. In the front row are three nieces and a daughter; Jarine Olson Freeman, Seattle, Ivor’s daughter; Shirley Olson Patterson, Carnation, Olaf’s daughter; Shari Olson Lawrence, Woodinville, Ted’s daughter, and Virginia Oien Phelan, Seattle, Olga’s daughter. —Photo by Barbara Nilson

Gathered on the front porch of the former Olson mansion on September 20 are Roosevelt (Ted) Olson and his wife, Cleo, at far right. In the back row are Ted’s nephews Jim Oien, Issaquah, and Keith Oien, Enumclaw, sons of Adeline Olson Oien; at back right is Vincent Olson, of Bothell, son of Ted. In front of Vincent is Ted’s daughter, Maureen Olson Engbert, of Seattle. In the front row are three nieces and a daughter; Jarine Olson Freeman, Seattle, Ivor’s daughter; Shirley Olson Patterson, Carnation, Olaf’s daughter; Shari Olson Lawrence, Woodinville, Ted’s daughter, and Virginia Oien Phelan, Seattle, Olga’s daughter. —Photo by Barbara Nilson

Sunday dinners and holidays were some of the special times at the Olson mansion on 216th, recalled Roosevelt (Ted) Olson and some of his nephews and nieces as they gathered at the mansion on September 20th for the historical society’s monthly program.

Eight Olson children, five boys and three girls, grew up in the home built about 1905. Roosevelt, known as Teddy, is the only son still living. Two daughters, Mrs. Adeline Oien of Kent, and Mrs. Anne Thompson, Seattle, are also still living. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 5, 2006

By Barbara Nilson

Today only the cobblestone fireplace survives. (Photo: Ken Jensen.)

Today only the cobblestone fireplace survives. (Photo: Ken Jensen.)

In a previous article on Selleck, August 22nd, a resource said the “old cobblestone fireplace and chimney that serves as the deck of a mobile home may have been part of the camp’s cookhouse”… Not so says Mrs. Pat (Trumpour) Schaeffer, currently of Kangley.

Mrs. Schaefer moved to Selleck in 1939 when she was three years old. Her Grampa, William Trumpour, built the house where the stone fireplace still stands. He sold it around 1946 to Cliff Morris who added a room to the house and built the stone fireplace. Schaeffer recalled that Morris was wounded in the First World War and was crippled so they helped with getting the stones for the fireplace.

“I was about ten years old and my brother and I packed all those rocks from around the area. It was hard work,” she said. The house was later sold again and finally burned to the ground leaving only the stone fireplace. (more…)

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Originally published in the Valley Daily News, August 26, 1991

By Tina Hilding

Brick works at Denny Renton Clay and Coal Company, 1909. (Photos courtesy Renton Historical Museum.)

Brick works at Denny Renton Clay and Coal Company, 1909. (Photos courtesy Renton Historical Museum.)

RENTON — North America Refractories, hidden away on a small road east of Interstate 405, seems like an ordinary small industry.

The 60-acre property off Houser Way has been for sale for a number of years and is being considered as a site for a county regional justice center.

In its heyday in the early 1900s, the factory, located on the south side of the Cedar River, was the largest paving brick plant in Washington—some say in the United States or in the world. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 22, 2006

By Barbara Nilson

The rebuilt Selleck School, completed in 1930, now serves as the Pacific States Condominiums. This April 10, 1940, photo is courtesy King County Assessor Property Card collection, Washington State Archives, Puget Sound Branch.

The rebuilt Selleck School, completed in 1930. This April 10, 1940, photo is courtesy King County Assessor Property Card collection, Washington State Archives, Puget Sound Branch.

At the end the Kent-Kangley Road east of Maple Valley is the mill town of Selleck, which still exists today; next door was the town of Lavender, or “Jap Town.” The mill is gone, but the school is still there and about 16 of the original houses. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 21, 1978

One of Maple Valley’s first stores, once well-stocked and standing where the Maple Valley Food Center is now located, still is used for storage as it rests in a pasture at the dead end of S.E. 216th Place. Built about 1896, it is probably the oldest commercial building remaining in Maple Valley. —Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.

One of Maple Valley’s first stores, once well-stocked and standing where the Maple Valley Food Center is now located, still is used for storage as it rests in a pasture at the dead end of S.E. 216th Place. Built about 1896, it is probably the oldest commercial building remaining in Maple Valley. —Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.

Maple Valley’s first store sits proudly in a pasture at the dead end of S.E. 216th Place and it is almost unnoticed.

Built about 1896, owned and run successively by William D. Gibbon and Joe Mezzavilla, it is probably the oldest commercial building remaining in Maple Valley.

According to Jayne Wissel, King County historic site researcher, there are many unique structures of local historical significance in the Maple Valley area such as the Scholtman house, the Lagesson cabin, and the Hobart school buildings.

Local citizens and members of the Maple Valley Historical Society have aided in the locating and historical research of these sites. Some information has been gathered on many more sites. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 5, 1977

By Vince O’Keefe

Sam Abbey, 1924

Sam Abbey, 1924

The sepia-tinted photograph was 50 years old but several faces were recognized instantly—Armand Galvagno, Elmer Favro, Joe Hosko, Benny Marino, Johnny Torlai, Jerry Remolif. These were some of the Georgetown Merchants, Seattle Soccer League champions for that particular year.

There were other remembered “mugs” in the yellowed pictures and crumbling clippings—Louie Pennacchi, Jim McMillan, Benny McPhillips, Henry Tessandore, Les Lapsansky, Tom Werner, Howie Baldwin, Chink Woehrie, Tex Michel

That’s the way it was at the first official outing of the Pacific Northwest Soccer Oldtimers Association, held in Black Diamond.

For one day, at least, “The Diamond” was the Cooperstown of soccer. About 140 ex-booters, the youngest in his 50s and the oldest 91, were reunited in the little hill town southeast of Renton.

Main attraction was a collection of old photographs, trophies, and memorabilia, rounded up by Pep Peery, association secretary. By coincidence, a slimmer, black-haired Peery appeared in several of the snapshots.

Mining-community teams dominated the display: Black Diamond, McKay Coal, Ravensdale, Carbonado, Wilkeson. That’s where it all started, the diggers from Wales and England and Italy playing their favorite game in the early part of the century. (more…)

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