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Posts Tagged ‘World War II’

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, August 31, 1994

Wally’s World by W.J. DuChateau

You may recall the time Evelyn pelted her husband, Joe, with eggs. It happened at one of the Black Diamond’s “egg contests,” in which couples try to softly catch eggs that are lofted back and forth between partners. But toward the end of this particular contest, things disintegrated into a general free-for-all; to paraphrase Ken Kesey’s popular observation, the game turned into a first-class egg-storm. Just ask Joe. (If you’re so inclined, it’s a wonderful way to garner revenge on your spouse.)

Or maybe you recall scrambling about in a pile of straw or shavings, anxiously searching for a few pennies, nickels, or dimes—the exact denomination depending upon the year and inflation rate at the time. But no matter how valuable the coins, you literally beamed with the joy and excitement of finding them.

It was called, perhaps inaccurately, a “penny hunt.” (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, May 2000

By Barbara Nilson

Photos by Sherrie Acker

The “action” in the 1920s to 1950s, from Seattle south, was at the lake resorts in the Valley. Memories of those glory days were shared at the March program with Dolores Gaffney and Janet Bertagni talking about Gaffney’s Lake Wilderness resort, and Gloria Foss remembering the family’s resort on Shadow Lake.

Lake Wilderness resorts

Attending the historical society program on resorts were, from left, Janet Bertagni, Dolores Gaffney Judge, and Bernadine Gaffney Gebenini.

Dolores Gaffney, daughter of Tom Gaffney, reported her father and his brother Kain purchased the property on Lake Wilderness in 1926 from Abraham and Sam Cohen. The family moved to the lake and the resort opened in the spring of 1927 as Gaffney’s Lake Wilderness.

At that time there were three small family resorts on the lake. Dieckman with his two sons, Jeff and Don, had just started one, and across the lake was McKinney’s. McKinney’s also had a dance hall that was two stories high that they eventually turned into a skating rink. In April 1939 McKinneys sold their place to Gaffneys.

One of the older buildings was used for a dance hall, said Dolores, and they used kerosene lamps. In 1936 they built a new dance hall after the old one burned down. They had a 30-foot-high diving board as well as cabins, tennis courts, picnic areas, ball fields, and playgrounds.

In 1949 Diekmans and Gaffneys were combined and the Gaffneys decided to build a lodge. The design was developed by Young, Richardson and Carlson and won the grand prize from the Washington Chapter of Architects in 1951 and the top award from the American Institute in New York in 1952. The center column totem pole was carved by the famous Doug McCarter. It is 35 feet tall and weighs ten tons. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, August 1999

By Lynda Maks

My father, Joseph Dal Santo, was born in 1885 in Sehio, Italy, and came to the U.S. around 1911. My mother, Anna Respleux, was born in 1896, in Wilkeson, Washington. They met at a boarding house in Black Diamond, which was run by my mother’s aunt and uncle, Joe and Mary Favro. They were married in August of 1914.

They had 8 children: Jules was born in 1916 in BD, Angeline (1917) in Cle Elum, and Alice (1918) in BD, who passed away with the flu in 1919. They then moved to Renton where they had Lynda (1920), Leo (1922), John (1924), and Joe (1925). They moved back to Black Diamond in 1930 so my dad could work for Pacific Coast Coal Company—you had to live in Black Diamond and live in their houses to work for them. You all know the song, “You Owe Your Soul to the Company Store”—that’s the way it was. My brother Roy was born in 1931. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, December 2000

By Barbara Nilson • Photos by Sherrie Acker

Bill and Irene (Maes) Bogh, Tahoma class Taylor class of 1939, at the Taylor program.

Bill and Irene (Maes) Bogh, Tahoma class Taylor class of 1939, at the Taylor program.

Taylor as a company town was discussed at the reunion Oct. 17. Dale Sandhei said he thought they had it better than a lot of people at that time—they had a sewer system, pumped in water, electricity, and the coal was delivered to their homes.

The company was very benevolent; they built a swimming pool and cleaned it out once a year. (more…)

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Originally published in the Black Diamond Bulletin, Spring 2013

By Ken Jensen

A business sign means more than just hanging out the proverbial “shingle.” There’s always a story.

Case in point. On the cover we find the KoernersJohn and Walt—posing in front of their drug store in 1925. One of the signs on the building is for United Cigar Stores Co.

Turns out that cigar franchise was a real boon for the Koerners—and for Black Diamond, too—as John Koerner reported in the September 1922 Pacific Coast Bulletin. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 2, 2003

By Kathleen Kear

Members of the Black Diamond Museum putting finishing touches on their ‘train’ float for the parade. (L-R) Don Mason, Dorothy & Howard Betts, and Dee Israel.

Members of the Black Diamond Museum putting finishing touches on their ‘train’ float for the parade. (L-R) Don Mason, Dorothy & Howard Betts, and Dee Israel.

Steeping in rich memories of yesteryear is the City of Black Diamond with its numerous parades, picnics, games and family activities, which were held in the city not only on Labor Day, but also the Fourth of July.

This Labor Day weekend, August 30–September 1, 2003, the City of Black Diamond once again celebrated with family and friends the final weekend marking the end of summer vacation and the start of school. It also honored the memory of the many men and women who worked hard in shaping Black Diamond to what it has become today.

As part of the weekend celebration, there was a parade, any number of games, a teen dance, barbecue dinner, pancake breakfast, car show, and a number of other activities geared for the whole family to enjoy.

Although recent memory identifies the time of celebration with family and friends with the Labor Day weekend, moving back to the turn of the century put the gathering of family and friends at the Fourth of July. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 29, 1969

Before the Pacific States Lumber Co. closed its mill in 1939, Selleck was a neat little town with a school, meeting hall, water system, and post office.

The mill superintendent lived in house number 1, the company doctor and supervisors lived in the 300 row, and mill hands lived in the 200 and 500 rows. (more…)

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