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Posts Tagged ‘Yakima’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 8, 1926

Orchardists throughout the fruit districts of Eastern Washington depend upon Diamond Briquets to protect their blossoming trees from damage by frost. Consequently, this spring the Pacific Coast Coal Company conducted an extensive advertising campaign in the Yakima, Walla Walla, and Wenatchee districts, featuring Diamond Briquets as the ideal fuel for orchard heating.

This picture shows a window display arranged in Yakima, through the courtesy of the Yakima Daily Republic and the Yakima Morning Herald. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 28, 1926

New Black Diamond Mine was visited by the representatives of the Sales Department as a part of the two-day program last week. In the mine the salesmen saw visual evidence of the company’s confidence in the future of the coal industry. The picture of the group was taken at the face of the gangway after they had walked in from the main entrance. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 3, 1925

I’m a coal miner for the same reason that you’re in business. To make a living.

Work in a coal mine is preferable to a job out-of-doors. Neither heat nor cold affect me, and the hazard is less than in railroading or window-washing.

I want my family to live in an American community, where American ideals prevail; where modern schools, churches, and a wholesome community spirit are present.

I want to work where there is not constant friction between employer and employee; where I can get fair play and a square deal.

In the coal mines, the state has one of its greatest natural resources. I want to help develop this industry; that commerce and manufacturing may prosper, and to keep this state free of a foreign fuel dependence.

Work in the coal mines of Washington gives me an opportunity to contribute to the upbuilding of the Pacific Northwest. I spend my money here for food, for clothes, automobiles and radios. You buy the coal which I mine and I’ll continue to add to your wealth as you promote my prosperity.

R.J. Miller
Newcastle coal miner

Washington coal mines expend more than twenty million dollars annually for payrolls and supplies! (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, November 22, 1925

Prosperous town on Naches Pass Highway surrounded by rich agricultural, timber, and mineral lands, is boasting of rapid development

New mill of the White River Lumber Company on the White River, three miles from Enumclaw.

One of the earliest settlements in that part of the state and the only place of that name in the United States, Enumclaw, forty miles southeast of Seattle, is one of the biggest little towns in the West.

Early history and distinctive name, however, are not Enumclaw’s only claims for attention. Thought its early growth was slow, Enumclaw today is counted one of the most prosperous towns in the Puget Sound region. Rich agricultural land, timber, and mineral surround it. It is on the Naches Pass highway, the most direct route between Seattle and the west entrance to Mount Rainier Nation Park. It is the gateway to unlimited scenic attractions, fishing, and hunting grounds. Backup up against the Cascade foothills, Enumclaw is within two hours’ drive of perpetual snow on one side and the waters of Puget Sound on the other. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 29, 1925

Gathered at the face of the rock tunnel in the New Black Diamond Mine, the men responsible for the excellent work of engineering and drilling which recently was completed there, are shown in the accompanying flashlight picture. The scene shows the men at the conclusion of drilling 28 holes in the barrier of 9½ feet of solid sandstone, which the blast broke down and connected the tunnel with the gangway which had been driven from the opposite side.

From left to right, they are; D.C. Botting, Bert Cook, Barney Doyle, F. Van Winkle, T.L. Jones (discoverer of the mine) , E.L. Fortney, foreman, L. Hayden, Jas. E. Ash, Chas. Gallagher, Ben Allen, foreman, R.W. Smith, Chas. Ryan, C. Busti. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 15, 1925

Prize livestock and big pumpkins were not the only attractions at the recent State Fair held at Yakima, as the booth pictured herewith will attest. John Ryczek, resident agent for the Pacific Coast Coal Company in Yakima, writes the Bulletin that the Diamond Briquets and the peaches, both varieties, attracted wide attention.

Over the picture of the alluring young ladies at the left, the sign reads. “These Peaches will not freeze, they use Diamond Briquets,” while at the right above the plates of fruit is the inscription, “These Peaches did not freeze, they used Diamond Briquets.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 10, 1925

That all men who ride coal trips are not coal miners is proven by this picture. The Bulletin photographer caught this trip just before it started for the twelfth level of Black Diamond Mine, where more than 1,500 feet below sea level, an attempt was made by radio experts to log some of the programs with which the air above the surface is charged. But the mine was too deep for the radio waves.

Cager Victor McDonald and Supt. Paul Gallagher are shown on the rear end, with Manager of Mines D.C. Botting in the car. Joe Bennett and Maj. S.E. Hutton are in the lower car. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 3, 1925

This is Supt. Simon Ash’s fiery steed, Flyer. It and its fellows hauled the coal trips in the mines of Western Washington before electric haulage came in.

Engineer-fireman Norman Stevenson and conductor-brakeman-flagman-switchman Tom Dodd do, or would, take turns lifting her back on the track when, as, and if she hopped off, they’re that strong and determined.

The Flyer was cold for years until she was fired up recently for yard duty to take the place of a storage-battery locomotive that went inside on development work. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 27, 1925

These handsome gentlemen run the stores. From left to right, upper row, they are C.T. Paulson of Carbonado, H.W. Doust of Newcastle, Malcolm McPhee, purchasing agent; lower row, L.W. Foreman of Burnett, H.M. McDowell of Black Diamond, and E.F. De Grandpre, Manager of Miscellaneous Operations. This picture shows them working hard at a business meeting.

Mr. McPhee buys the goods, the store managers sell them, and Mr. De Grandpre gets all the money. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 30, 1925

No feature of the First Aid and Mine Rescue Meet held last Saturday at Black Diamond attracted more attention than the exhibition in first aid and resuscitation work put on by the midget teams from Newcastle and Black Diamond. So far as is known, these two teams are the youngest First Aid teams in the world.

Fathers of the boys are miners employed by the Pacific Coast Coal Company, and the interest displayed by the youngsters is indicative of the efforts put forth by everyone to make mining safe. Members of the Newcastle team, in the front row, include Ernie Bahr, Howard Cotterill, Donald Gilbert, Clyde Joughlin, John Young, and Wm. Schuirman.

The Black Diamond boys, in the back row, are Elmon Rouse, John Gallagher, Harold Lloyd, Jr., Benny Hughes, Oliver Rouse, Jimmy Nicholson, and Ellis Ash. Harold Lloyd, Sr., trained the Black Diamond team and Wm. Jones was the instructor for the Newcastle lads. (more…)

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